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Old 14-01-2003, 00:22:30   #1
Snapcase
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Post The Revenge of Music Phase Two: Cross-Over

Yesterday, "Danger! High Voltage" by Electric 6 reached #2 on the UK Singles chart. Last week, Sean Paul's "Gimme the Light" was chosen as Sara Cox's Record of the Week and moved up to the Radio One B Playlist. Today, "Mundia To Bach Ke" by Panjabi MC was released as major-label single and is hotly tipped for success.

What do all of these tracks have in common? They've all originated from the shapeless and fractured genre ghetto into which the impoverishment of commercial music in the late nineties pushed all creative forces. All of them are consistently too "weird" to have reached major public success in the last 20 years ago. And all of them, with the possible exception of the Electric 6 single, have reached the top through a continual slow buildup over a long period of time, with clubland and radio play forming the commercial base and no major-artist marketting money.

Teeny-bop, commerical dance and boy bands are dying as commercial forces. Instead audiences are waking up to the possibility of singles growing out of the minority genres, the cream of each one's crop reaching the listeners of the mainstream. With the internet having effectively killed off the limiting constraints of major-label access control, we're looking at a bright, diverse future indeed. Look out soon for phase three: the cross-breeding of all the genres.

Last edited by The Management; 14-01-2003 at 10:29:54.
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Old 14-01-2003, 00:24:05   #2
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This is the most pretentious tosh I've ever read on here. You should be ashamed.
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Old 14-01-2003, 08:51:04   #3
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Not true either.

Surely if the minority genres were going to explode into the singles charts it would have been in 2001 when the strokes, white stripes etc. made their initial impact. Last year there was limited singles success for the hives, white stripes again, the vines a bit, etc. but in no shape or form are they making enough of an impact to displace the 'teeny-bop, commercial dance or boy bands'.

I don't see any reason why the three records you've mentioned are any more of a flash in the pan than anything else that has crept into the charts over the last few years and then completely disappeared again.
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Old 14-01-2003, 09:34:14   #4
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"last few ears"

or "lost few ears"?
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Old 14-01-2003, 10:42:41   #5
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bugger
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after that, it's the same old fucking thing all over again.
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Old 14-01-2003, 10:52:58   #6
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I think you're under the heavily mistaken belief that the general public cares about our own little Ghetto Genre, K_G. The other two genres concerned, Dancehall and Bhangra, probably have more specific listeners worldwide than Detroit Garage Rock ever will.

And now... All three records are exceptionally good, while also being very popular. They're also all damn unusual cases, all at the same time, which to me indicates something is happening.

"Gimme The Light" is the first quality, non-poppified Jamaican track in over 25 years to make a sizeable dent in western markets (#7 in the US before christmas, after an incredibly slow climb and loadsa weeks on the chart). A commercially mid-to-low-size genre has produced a major hit.

"Mundia To Bach Ke" is to my knowledge the only Bhangra track ever to be remotely popular. A commercially mid-size genre has produced a major clubland hit.

"Danger! High Voltage" is of course from a genre that we're more familiar with, but not at this level. No-one would have honestly thought a Garage Rock track would reach #2 on the UK charts, did they? Again, medium-volume Genre, Huge hit.

I ask you, can you name one, one track in the past 20 years that has come from a genre totally out of the conciousness of the genreal public or regarded as a curiosity, and become really, really popular on a massive scale, without Major-Label marketting?
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Old 14-01-2003, 10:59:29   #7
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Quote:
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
I think you're under the heavily mistaken belief that the general public cares about our own little Ghetto Genre, K_G. The other two genres concerned, Dancehall and Bhangra, probably have more specific listeners worldwide than Detroit Garage Rock ever will.
ok, fair point

Quote:
I ask you, can you name one, one track in the past 20 years that has come from a genre totally out of the conciousness of the genreal public or regarded as a curiosity, and become really, really popular on a massive scale, without Major-Label marketting?
yes, definitely, but just give me time to think of one

I wonder if some of the records at the start of the rave or drum n bass scenes might fall into this category

I mean roni size was absolutely huge for a while, for example
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i check my hair at the elevator mirror and the highlight of my day when I say hi to a girl who's opposite of the elevator door at my floor. the one i went out with.
after that, it's the same old fucking thing all over again.
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Old 14-01-2003, 11:02:25   #8
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Supersharpshooter EP - definitely.
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Old 14-01-2003, 11:13:30   #9
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Although I can't find it's chart position.
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Old 14-01-2003, 11:17:19   #10
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You're not referring to the Shortsharpshock EP by Therapy?, are you?
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Old 14-01-2003, 12:55:41   #11
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Smells Like Teen Spirit got to number 7 from out of nowhere. Don't let the hugh bloated genre it spawned let you forget how "underground" it was at the time.
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Old 14-01-2003, 12:59:27   #12
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True, and no I wasn't talking about Shortsharpshock but that got up to number 14.
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Old 14-01-2003, 12:59:54   #13
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OK SuperSharpShooter counted as an album not a single.
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Old 14-01-2003, 19:32:47   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed

I ask you, can you name one, one track in the past 20 years that has come from a genre totally out of the conciousness of the genreal public or regarded as a curiosity, and become really, really popular on a massive scale, without Major-Label marketting?
"Pump up the volume"- MARRS.

"Jack your body"- Steve "Silk" Hurley

"Godstar"- Psychic TV
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Old 14-01-2003, 19:35:04   #15
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Stretch it to 1979 and you've got the entire output of Two-Tone.

Oh yes. "Dolittle" by Pixies going top 10 in 1989.
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Old 14-01-2003, 19:37:15   #16
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The funny thing is that every time those artists charted, they were instantly accused of selling out.

And another thing. The Electric 6 record is a novelty record.
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Old 14-01-2003, 19:38:07   #17
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And another one...

"You spin me round"- Dead or Alive.
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Old 14-01-2003, 19:40:00   #18
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Incidentally, I bought "Mundia To Bach Ke" three years ago. Christ knows why it's resurfaced.
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Old 14-01-2003, 20:23:38   #19
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Look like we've got scabby on this one
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Old 14-01-2003, 20:35:48   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by Snapcase


Teeny-bop, commerical dance and boy bands are dying as commercial forces. Instead audiences are waking up to the possibility of singles growing out of the minority genres, the cream of each one's crop reaching the listeners of the mainstream. With the internet having effectively killed off the limiting constraints of major-label access control, we're looking at a bright, diverse future indeed. Look out soon for phase three: the cross-breeding of all the genres.
Substitute "the internet" with "home taping/Rough Trade's distribution network/clubland /etc", and that heralded "bright new dawn" happens about every 5 years.
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Old 14-01-2003, 22:15:01   #21
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Incidentally, I've thought of some more.

LFO- "LFO"

Happy Mondays- "WFL".

The Stone Roses- "Fool's Gold"

The Orb- "Little fluffy clouds"
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Old 15-01-2003, 12:48:05   #22
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
The funny thing is that every time those artists charted, they were instantly accused of selling out.

And another thing. The Electric 6 record is a novelty record.
Dammit, Laz, I asked K_G not you. I'd have used a different argument on yer esteemed self. Now I've gotta go through and download all of this obscure eighties music, bollocks.

Surely the fact that no-one is accused of selling out anymore is a positive step!

And you think everything is a novelty record.
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Old 15-01-2003, 12:49:11   #23
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Incidentally, I bought "Mundia To Bach Ke" three years ago. Christ knows why it's resurfaced.
Hits are built up locally again, like in the sixties! Halelujah. "Gimme The Light" is a year old as well.
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Old 15-01-2003, 13:00:40   #24
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Quote:
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Substitute "the internet" with "home taping/Rough Trade's distribution network/clubland /etc", and that heralded "bright new dawn" happens about every 5 years.
Which is why I was hesitant to include that paragraph since it doesn't really add to the point of the news item. Which, of course, is that when Pop has developed aesthetics as fundamentally different as Norwegian Viking Black Metal and Brazilian Fonkee, it's practically impossible to overlook them all. And that it seems to me that the music that ends up in the mainstream from all the different genres is increasingly unspoilt and unsullied, suggesting that there are networks in place out there that push up the best of their own genres into the public conciousness.

The death of boy bands, commercial dance and teeny-boppers is pretty well-documented, though. Surely it's been over a year since a boy band charted significantly, "One True Voice" excepted? And the Britney ilk is fucking dead commercially. Commercial dance still hangs on ("Heaven" #1 the other week) but is nowhere near as big as in 1999 or so. What we've got instead is Kylie-Robbie-Middle-Age-Pop, Avril-Lavigne-Fake-Guitar-Pop, and Nelly-and-Kelly-lite-R&B. And, hopefully, more records like the mentioned three.
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Old 15-01-2003, 13:06:00   #25
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still got those fecking 'made-up-by-tv- bands.
hopefully they'll all die quickly too.
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Old 15-01-2003, 19:44:02   #26
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Quote:
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed

The death of boy bands, commercial dance and teeny-boppers is pretty well-documented, though. Surely it's been over a year since a boy band charted significantly, "One True Voice" excepted? And the Britney ilk is fucking dead commercially. Commercial dance still hangs on ("Heaven" #1 the other week) but is nowhere near as big as in 1999 or so. What we've got instead is Kylie-Robbie-Middle-Age-Pop, Avril-Lavigne-Fake-Guitar-Pop, and Nelly-and-Kelly-lite-R&B. And, hopefully, more records like the mentioned three.
Right now the market's saturated with yer Wills, yer Gareths, yer TV sensations...

No matter. In a couple of years, about a million more pre-pubescent girls will feel the first hormonal stirrings and look for a safely unthreatening set of teeny-icons to provide the soundtrack. I think it's safe to assume it won't be a Garage punk band.
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Old 15-01-2003, 19:55:44   #27
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Maybe the children will not drive the singles market anymore.

Oh, and would "Ride on Time" count for the "out of the blue" thing?
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Old 15-01-2003, 20:37:34   #28
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Not really. There were loads of records like that at the time. If you look at the charts of 1988/1989 you'd probably conclude it was the death of music. Jive Bunny everywhere....
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Old 15-01-2003, 21:15:52   #29
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Come on everybody, C-C-Come on everybody.

To my eternal shame I actually owned (and liked) the Jive Bunny album. My only defence is that I was 12.
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Old 15-01-2003, 22:35:52   #30
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Call that a defence?
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Old 15-01-2003, 23:14:50   #31
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Hey, before that I liked Dire Straits, Phil Collins, and Level 42.
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Old 15-01-2003, 23:35:06   #32
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Quote:
Originally posted by Debaser
Come on everybody, C-C-Come on everybody.

To my eternal shame I actually owned (and liked) the Jive Bunny album. My only defence is that I was 12.
Aye caramba!
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Old 16-01-2003, 09:25:30   #33
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Quote:
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Hey, before that I liked Dire Straits, Phil Collins, and Level 42.
At least it was a step forward then.
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Old 18-01-2003, 01:01:07   #34
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I ask you, can you name one, one track in the past 20 years that has come from a genre totally out of the conciousness of the genreal public or regarded as a curiosity, and become really, really popular on a massive scale, without Major-Label marketting?
I suppose Smash by the Offspring (still - allegedly - the biggest-selling "independent" record of all time) counts as one...
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Old 20-01-2003, 18:46:31   #35
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So fucking shitting cunting Nickelback didn't manage to overtake it then?
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Old 22-01-2003, 17:15:22   #36
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If they have I've not read it anywhere. Not really sure Roadrunner counts as a real indie anyway...
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Old 22-01-2003, 23:31:49   #37
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Not with that shit they don't!
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Old 23-01-2003, 10:35:12   #38
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They've got the distributive power of a major label. Epitaph certainly didn't when Smash was released. Gurewitz was refused loans to produce more copies of that album even though they were flying off the shelves... Smash might have sold 8 million but the process of getting it out nearly closed the record label.
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Old 23-01-2003, 18:49:09   #39
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Well fortunately they didn't. And look at who is laughing now Actually weren't the pressers quite understanding about the manufacture of the CDs and would let him pay later, as it was shifting so fast?
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Old 24-01-2003, 11:08:48   #40
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After a while, yes. Initially they refused Epitaph credit. It wasn't until it was blatantly obvious that it was flying off the shelves that they changed their mind...
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Old 24-01-2003, 21:07:10   #41
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Well they certainly gave the label a lot more resources to do what they do. It certainly gave contemporary punk more of a platform...
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