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-   -   Wot iz u bin reedinge utt ve mowment? (http://www.counterglow.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5908)

DaShi 08-09-2004 03:46:34

To Kill a CBeast by I.M. Bored

MDA 08-09-2004 12:27:54

Ben Bova - Saturn

Was this supposed to be a screenplay or a novel?

It would have made a better B movie, but it worked well as "something to read on an airplane". Reminded me of the backstory for SMAC a little.

King_Ghidra 10-09-2004 08:54:08

Finished 'Football and the Enemy' by Simon Kuper. More a collection of vignettes than a consistent inquiry into the relationship of football and poltics, but full of enough amusing, fascinating and downright depressing stories to more than justify the reader's time. As with all the best football books it's more about life than football, and i would happily recommend it to non-footy fans.

Next up...hmm...not sure...i started reading Ender's Game but it seems a bit hokey.

BigGameHunter 10-09-2004 15:58:25

It is.

Read the Riverworld series by Phillip Jose Farmer.
Or VALIS by Phillip K. Dick.
Or "Wolfling" by Gordon R. Dickson

Angelhorns 12-09-2004 13:25:53

I just read 'Coma' by Alex Garland.
I was a bit suspicious at first because I immediately think of Garland as being attached to chickpea-faced Leo di Caprio, but actually it proved to be a fantastic little read. He captures the feelings of disorientation and confusion of dreams perfectly. Also the way that dreaming can capture and twist things from reality and how dreams can have their own life. Its quite quick to read, and asks some interesting questions. No trace of chickpea heads either.
I'd give it a 7 or 8 out of 10.

King_Ghidra 13-09-2004 08:39:26

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
It is.

Read the Riverworld series by Phillip Jose Farmer.
Or VALIS by Phillip K. Dick.
Or "Wolfling" by Gordon R. Dickson

thanks for the tips.

I actually started reading Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler. Never read any of his stuff before, despite seeing about 6 zillion parodies/homages, but the real thing is quite brilliant.

fp 13-09-2004 09:01:02

I too was very impressed with Chandler when I read him. :beer:

Rodgers 13-09-2004 14:58:40

I've been reading a dumbed down economics book written by a Times journalist - called "Free Lunch" - helped me understand some the Euro and housing market stories in the news a bit by reminding me of my "A" level studies.

BigGameHunter 13-09-2004 16:08:29

Did Chandler do "Asphalt Jungle" as well? Great movie...don't remember if I read the book.

If you are enjoying the hard boiled detective style of writing, I highly recommend "Noir" by Jeter...very reminiscent of Blade Runner (he is, in fact, the "authorized" torch bearer per Dick's estate). Very good William Gibsonesque future tech with a 40's detective style.

RedFred 17-09-2004 19:23:12

Wow! We are back to talking about books. Nice to see BGH's personal life in the main forum where it belongs.

Currently reading another Peter Hamilton: Pandora's Star. Good so far.

Scabrous Birdseed 17-09-2004 20:35:48

No, "Asphalt Jungle" isn't one of Chandler's books although he may well have written the screenplay, he did quite a few classic ones (notably "Double Indemnity" and "Strangers on a Train").

I've read six of Chandler's seven novels (have been searching for "Playback" but it hasn't been conveniently anthologised like the others) and I think they're all brilliant, Marlowe's world is one of the finest literary creations I've come across. If you want to cherry-pick the best ones I recommend "The Big Sleep" and later work "The Little Sister", though I have a naggling suspicion "Playback" may be better than both based on descriptions I've read.

Anyone know if his short stories are worth hunting down?

(Currently reading: "The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes", an anthology of lesser-known victorian detective fiction.)

Angelhorns 20-09-2004 19:39:26

I believe W R Burnett wrote the Asphalt Jungle. The film being noted mainly these days for its early Marilyn Monroe performance as a gangster's moll.

King_Ghidra@home 21-09-2004 20:28:27

thanks for the tips SB, i have finished Farewell My Lovely now and i thoroughly enjoyed it, so i shall probably try to pick up another one or two of chandler's books shortly

i just ordered a load of swamp thing and sandman tpbs though so they may be next

BigGameHunter 25-09-2004 15:09:20

I think I'll read "Six Armies in Normandy" now...I've bought a ton of WW2 books and haven't read them through yet.

Scabrous Birdseed 25-09-2004 15:29:11

Currently reading "The Documents in the Case" by Dorothy L Sayers. Remember the discussion we had about strange perspectives in books and someone mentioned having read a novel consisting entirely of letters written by various people? Well, this is that book. It's okay so far, but I'm wondering what'll happen once the inevitable murder occurs.

Angelhorns 25-09-2004 18:13:20

i saw a book in a shop the other day, a Victorian tome, entitled 'Syphilis' in the fiction section

I really wished I'd looked at it

zmama 25-09-2004 19:08:17

I'm reading two books I picked up on my travels..The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon. Thanks MoSe!!!

And something I picked up in a charity shop in Reading... Mastering COBOL.
:gasmaske:

fp 25-09-2004 21:33:32

I've just finished reading The Da Vinci Code, which I thought was really good. I'd never heard of it until about a week ago, but I gather now that almost everyone in the universe has bought a copy of it, so I guess you all know what it's about.

I decided pretty early on that the best plan was not to get caught up in whether or not these bizarre conspiracy theories are actually true or not, but to treat the book as exactly what it is - a work of fiction - and enjoy the thrilling plot.

The ending was as absurdly lame as I had feared it would be, but I was really gripped by the story. Haven't had as much fun reading a book as this in a long while. Have picked up a couple of Dan Brown's other books 'cos they also sounded good.

Scabrous Birdseed 26-09-2004 08:21:53

I've never bothered with that one since the basic conspiracy theory (Priory of Sion as keepers of the true blood etc.) is very well known to me. It'll kill off the excitement I think.

Immortal Wombat 26-09-2004 22:29:26

Quote:

Originally posted by fp
Haven't had as much fun reading a book as this in a long while. Have picked up a couple of Dan Brown's other books 'cos they also sounded good.
And boy is he milking it... :D I'm torn: I really enjoy reading them for the suspense and the terribly exciting and informative storylines, but they are pretty formulaic (anonymous killer, crippled intellectual, knowledgable civilian in Something Big). I don't know if he'll get much more life out of it after his next book. Still, they are pretty good fun. I was so gripped by Deception Point that I spent most of a weekend walking between bookshops reading it.

King_Ghidra 28-09-2004 16:08:08

Got my Sandman TPB's through so started reading The Doll's House arc. First time i've read Sandman and very good it is too.

JM^3 28-09-2004 16:22:42

Quote:

Originally posted by fp
I've just finished reading The Da Vinci Code, which I thought was really good. I'd never heard of it until about a week ago, but I gather now that almost everyone in the universe has bought a copy of it, so I guess you all know what it's about.

I decided pretty early on that the best plan was not to get caught up in whether or not these bizarre conspiracy theories are actually true or not, but to treat the book as exactly what it is - a work of fiction - and enjoy the thrilling plot.

The ending was as absurdly lame as I had feared it would be, but I was really gripped by the story. Haven't had as much fun reading a book as this in a long while. Have picked up a couple of Dan Brown's other books 'cos they also sounded good.

I know a lot of people who think that the conspiracy theories laid out in the book are true

JM

King_Ghidra 28-09-2004 16:37:17

yeah one of the guys at work read da vinci code and got totally tangled up in it all, he insisted i read a load of stuff on dan brown's website about the various 'secret organisations' out there

Immortal Wombat 28-09-2004 19:28:18

I wouldn't be surprised if there had been a Priory of Sion, if the Templars had been up to something under that temple, possibly the whole lot even lasted until the 1500s - there were a whole bunch of "secret societies", semi-religious sects and whatnot at the time. But IMO the modern Priory is a hoax, and if there ever was anything interesting, no matter how continuous the 'lineage' from Priory into Freemasons, humanity really is very bad at logistics and preserving oral knowledge over long periods of time - if there was a secret, there ain't any more.

Scabrous Birdseed 28-09-2004 19:52:01

Well, I believe it's pretty much the opposite - secret societies (aka opportunities for men to get away from their wives, feel important, play silly games and drink beer) were dime a dozen in the 19th century and it doesn't take a wild imagination to believe a group of french intellectuals concocted a silly tradition to base one around. Nor is it to stretch it incredibly to believe remnants still exist today. Spiritualist churches, weird patriotic orders, freemasons, etc. certainly do.

RedFred 28-09-2004 20:32:29

Quote:

Originally posted by zmama
I'm reading two books I picked up on my travels..The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon. Thanks MoSe!!!

And something I picked up in a charity shop in Reading... Mastering COBOL.
:gasmaske:

Thomas Pynchon is great but I haven't read any of his for years. V and Gravity's Rainbow were both excellent.

Immortal Wombat 28-09-2004 21:26:26

Quote:

Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Well, I believe it's pretty much the opposite -
Ok, but the point being that any modern Priory had a concocted tradition rather than an actual one.

zmama 28-09-2004 21:33:36

Quote:

Originally posted by RedFred
Thomas Pynchon is great but I haven't read any of his for years. V and Gravity's Rainbow were both excellent.
The Crying of Lot 49 was short and black humor with very dense language. It was excellent.
I've been meaning to read Mason and Dixon...so I guess I should do it!

BigGameHunter 28-09-2004 22:05:30

The Knights Templar still exist in fraternal order form.

Just started "On the Beach".

MoSe 30-09-2004 10:44:17

Quote:

Originally posted by zmama
The Crying of Lot 49 was short and black humor with very dense language. It was excellent.
I'm glad it met your liking!
:coolgrin:

now I might get back to reread my italian copy... :D

Btw, the Maas is Rotterdam's river, and it's Meuse in France, and in italian it's called... Mosa.... :cute: :coolgrin:

MoSe 30-09-2004 10:55:22

I'm halfway thru "Oracle Night", by Paul Auster (an author I first had picked up when traveling by train to meet Aredhran in '99 :))

It's haunting.
It's recursive, it's a novel within a novel within a novel... and While I went thru it a few pages every night, I felt as if I was the outermost meta-layer, as if my life itself (as it was incidentally unfolding in this september) found reference in what I was reading.... as if I was enacting the story of a bigger meta-writer above...

:nervous:

http://www.reviewsofbooks.com/oracle_night/
according to the NYT reviewer, [Auster writes] stories that twist and turn back on themselves in never-ending ambiguity, like MOBIUS strips. :eek:

;)

fp 03-10-2004 09:43:32

Quote:

Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
but they are pretty formulaic (anonymous killer, crippled intellectual, knowledgable civilian in Something Big).
After reading Angels and Demons I've realised that this is the case. :D

Still, you're right when you say that they are tense and exciting books. I'm going to start reading Deception Point next week, actually, and am looking forward to it. I know what to expect now. ;)

jsorense 05-10-2004 17:33:09

"The Songlines" by Bruece Chatwin (1987)
It is about the author's attempt to understand the origin myths of the Austrailian Aboriginies that inhabit the Outback.

BigGameHunter 09-10-2004 12:05:51

Am also reading "I Am Legend"...the book "The Omega Man" was based (quite loosely) on.

Angelhorns 11-10-2004 00:31:16

I'm reading Roddy Doyle's 'The Woman who Walked Into Doors' for my book group. Only one chapter in so far. Lots of people said they disliked Farewell Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha or whatever it was called. Anyone read any?

King_Ghidra 11-10-2004 08:20:36

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Am also reading "I Am Legend"...the book "The Omega Man" was based (quite loosely) on.
always wanted to read I Am Legend, tell us what you think about it

BigGameHunter 12-10-2004 01:07:21

It was really good...more a novella, though. The book came with a few other stories that were very "Twilight Zone" esque.

I'd be interested in reading more of Matheson's novels, if he wrote any.

Now I'll have to rent the movie again and see if it is a good complement...I vaguely remember some similarities, but I don't think they portrayed a lot of the tension, which was internal within the lead character of the book.

King_Ghidra 22-10-2004 12:26:19

Currently reading Joyce's Portrait of the Artist As A Young Man. So far so good.

I finished all my Sandman tpb's, they were brilliant.

alsieboo 23-10-2004 10:40:34

Finaly read (partly anyway) Catcher in the Rye by JD Sallinger, glad I did

Debaser 24-10-2004 00:27:39

Why only partly? It's a tiny book. You could read it all in an hour or so.

This is probably the reason why it's the book I've read more often than any other.

JM^3 24-10-2004 00:34:07

House of Leaves is what I am currently reading

JM

Debaser 24-10-2004 00:49:15

I've read the first few pages of The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay about 5 times this week, but can't seem to find the motivation to read any more. Everyone who's read it seem to love it though so I'll persist...

Scabrous Birdseed 24-10-2004 09:30:15

I've read it and I thought it somewhat mediocre. "Carter Beats The Devil" is a much better book done in a similar style.

BigGameHunter 24-10-2004 16:17:24

Taking a break from novels and back to my old addiction: Nebula Sci Fi compilations. Lots of great English writers in there, BTW.

King_Ghidra 25-10-2004 08:38:36

Quote:

Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
I've read it and I thought it somewhat mediocre. "Carter Beats The Devil" is a much better book done in a similar style.
agreed, great book

MOBIUS 25-10-2004 11:01:44

Currently reading Sedimentology & Stratigraphy:clueless:

Funkodrom 25-10-2004 11:04:11

Pervert.

Angelhorns 28-10-2004 00:21:43

Quote:

Originally posted by Debaser
Why only partly? It's a tiny book. You could read it all in an hour or so.

This is probably the reason why it's the book I've read more often than any other.

It takes me 3 days for a book that size.
I am SUCH a slow reader it infuriates me!!

Angelhorns 28-10-2004 00:24:01

Quote:

Originally posted by alsieboo
Finaly read (partly anyway) Catcher in the Rye by JD Sallinger, glad I did
I didnt like it when I read it- I was about your age then, and I now think a lot of it went over my head (I wasnt as streetwise as your good self)

If you like it you should read The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, but make sure you aren't suicidal first.

I also think you'd like Lolita, its very humorous.

Immortal Wombat 28-10-2004 00:26:09

I think it took me three days from starting to finishing. It was my in-the-toilet-book.


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