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-   -   Wot iz u bin reedinge utt ve mowment? (http://www.counterglow.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5908)

BigGameHunter 19-02-2004 16:31:41

Also revisiting "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood as preparation for why I'll vote Democrat this November.

zmama 19-02-2004 16:56:07

My daughters and I thank you.

Venom 19-02-2004 18:29:22

For reading, or being a deluded liberal ass puppet?

zmama 19-02-2004 18:48:09

Yes

BigGameHunter 20-02-2004 10:51:28

Don't worry, if it all goes sideways on us, I'll be sure to "get religion" so you can be my handmaids.
At least I'll let you smoke and drink in secret (provided you aren't carrying my children, that is).

RedFred 20-02-2004 23:17:34

Back when Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale came out twenty years ago, I tried reading it but I couldn't complete it. Too much left wing Anti-Americanness and general looneyness for me.

But I recently saw the movie. I hate to say it, but now in the current GWB Jr. era, the tale suddenly comes across as chilling and effective. I might have to give the book another shot.

BigGameHunter 21-02-2004 19:27:13

It's pretty well done and doesn't seem at all totally unlikely. You'd have a major uprising, but unfortunately, it's now within the realm of remote possibility.

RedFred 21-02-2004 19:58:05

I'll check the library for it.

It the meantime I am reading Forward's Saturn Rukh. Serves me right for whining about soft, unoriginal SF in the other thread. This guy has some interesting and somewhat plausible ideas, but he kind of falls down on the storytelling side of things. Still, not a bad read so far.

Noisy 21-02-2004 23:01:46

Now reading 'The Remains of the Day' by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Went to see the play of 'The Handmaid's Tale' last year. Bit of a minimalist production that I didn't think much of.

BigGameHunter 23-02-2004 11:08:26

You ended your sentence with a preposition. You must still be in shock!

Lazarus and the Gimp 27-02-2004 17:51:44

Re-reading "Into thin air" by Jon Krakauer.

Noisy 27-02-2004 19:09:11

Wot's a preposition? :p

Now reading 'Just Six Number' by Martin Rees, about the fundamental constants of the Universe.

I enjoyed 'The Remains of the Day'. Took me a while to get over the fact that it was written by a bloke with oriental appearance and name. By the end I'd forgotten about that and was absorbed in the story. I'll look out for the film on DVD now, so that I can make the comparison.

alsieboo 02-03-2004 10:16:02

I've just finished reading "They came and ate us - Armageddon II: The B-movie" by Robert Rankin and I'm currently enjoying 'Windfall' Penny Vincenzi and also 'An ordinary lunacy' Jessica Anderson. The latest two are revolving around high flying yong men and their lovers in some way, one more dated than the other, but both high class society trash. Needless to say I'm enjoying it :p

BigGameHunter 02-03-2004 16:13:30

OK...just finished "House of Sound and Fog" (no, I don't have a reading disability, I have kids!!!).
I need a great book with short chapters that I can read in the bath.

zmama 02-03-2004 16:31:41

Fiction or non? ...not that I have anything in mind right now :lol:

QtFLW@Work 02-03-2004 16:37:10

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
OK...just finished "House of Sound and Fog" (no, I don't have a reading disability, I have kids!!!).
I need a great book with short chapters that I can read in the bath.

So something with plastic pages them? I think my youngest kids have something that'd qualify.

Noisy 13-03-2004 13:07:35

Just finished 'Night Watch' by Terry Pratchett. Engaging and well written.

Noisy 15-03-2004 15:23:37

Now reading 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' by Lynn Truss. This book is right up my street, being dedicated to a discussion of spelling issues that are meat and drink to a spelling nazi like me!

BigGameHunter 15-03-2004 21:56:05

Just started "Chindi" by Jack McDevitt (sp?). A good, brisk second contact type sci fi book. I'm liking his style a lot.

alsieboo 16-03-2004 01:23:27

right, finished the big fat trashy romance, can't find other book, so I'm now reading 'American psyco' Hm.

King_Ghidra 16-03-2004 09:56:51

Quote:

Originally posted by Noisy
Now reading 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' by Lynn Truss. This book is right up my street, being dedicated to a discussion of spelling issues that are meat and drink to a spelling nazi like me!
Got this the other day, but haven't started on it yet.

Now into the second Conan compilation. Looks better than the first so far, but that was good fun so i have high hopes.

Quote:

Originally posted by Alsieboo

so I'm now reading 'American psyco' Hm.

great book. Although i leant it to my sister when she was about 16/17 and i think she found some of it a bit much.

I'll say Rat. And i'll say no more.

BigGameHunter 17-03-2004 19:29:07

I'm ramping up now, baby!
Now reading "Chindi" (good) Siddhartha (re-reading) and picked up "Into the Wild" (forget the author but he's a really good travel/outdoor writer type)--a true story about a disaffected rich kid who goes into the woods in a Kerouacian/Tolstoyian fugue and dies of starvation.

Rodgers 18-03-2004 12:11:12

Just finished Albert Speers autobiog. Now reading "The Fall of Crete" by Alan Clark (of The Diaries fame).

Chris 18-03-2004 19:22:00

On a WWII kick Rodgers?

Scabrous Birdseed 18-03-2004 20:09:06

Martin Heidegger, "Origin of Works of Art". Unfortunately.

jsorense 19-03-2004 16:02:28

I finally finished Alastair Reynolds' Chasm City. I thought it was overlong, boring and the three plot lines were never integrated properly. I forced myself to finish it becuz I'm a cheap SoB and didn't want to waste (HA!) my money.

[waiting for Qweeg to explode]

QtFLW@Work 19-03-2004 20:28:12

Isn't it already wasted because you spent it on a crap book? :D

Noisy 20-03-2004 10:59:03

Now reading 'The Lion's Game' by Nelson DeMille. Apparently I should have read 'Plum Island' first.

'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' is an excellent book, however ... I really can't forgive that Nevil Shute was spelled incorrectly (in two different ways) on the cover and in the body of the book: are these folk illiterate?

Noisy 20-03-2004 11:01:25

Oh, and Mr Ense ... 'Chasm City' is a fine book: how you could think it boring, I just don't know.

I can try and do something about the exploding of Qweeg this afternoon ... if he remembers to turn up.

Qweeg 20-03-2004 11:59:06

Don't worry, I'm not going to explo>BANG!<

RedFred 20-03-2004 21:48:56

Finally found the first of Modesitt's Recluse series. I think Chagarra recommended it. Great read.

I am part way through Bujold's Diplomatic Immunity now. That Vorkosigan series is great, but I had to skip one that I couldn't find.

Rodgers 22-03-2004 11:14:37

Quote:

Originally posted by Chris
On a WWII kick Rodgers?
Yup, lately at least. Now reading "Ill Met By Moonlight" - the book they based the film on - about resistance in Crete during WWII.

JM^3 28-03-2004 01:50:44

I just read all of the black company series by glen cook

it was decent

Jon Miller

alsieboo 28-03-2004 02:07:57

Blood hunt - Ian Rankin as Jack Harvey. I've left AP for a while.

Lady_of_Chicken 28-03-2004 03:29:29

So many books, so little time. :(

JM^3 28-03-2004 04:00:15

yah

during my spring break I read like 13 novels or something like that

and it's not even over yet

Jon Miller

Noisy 28-03-2004 09:53:59

Now reading 'Dr. Bloodmoney' by Phillip K. Dick.

BigGameHunter 29-03-2004 21:00:05

Ooooh...my favorite author (well, in the top five or so anyhow). Have you struggled through the VALIS trilogy yet? A pretty good glimpse of what the world must be like to someone who has had a major (or minor?) psychotic "break".

alsieboo 01-04-2004 21:11:32

Dreamcatcher - Stephen King

Noisy 06-04-2004 10:33:48

Now reading 'Project Orion' by George Dyson. During the 1950s and 1960s there were research efforts into spaceflight using atomic bombs as the propulsion mechanism. This story is told by the son of Freeman Dyson; Freeman being one of the people involved in the project.

Immortal Wombat 06-04-2004 17:10:34

Back to the office, so I've started the suitably long Count of Monte Cristo to see me through the next three months of lunch hours.

BigGameHunter 07-04-2004 04:38:06

Well, fuck you too, Noisy!

Noisy 07-04-2004 10:39:19

Sorry, BGH. Not an intentional snub. Just that my focus flits around at the moment.

I find that PKD is a bit hard to take, but I read his stuff for the ideas. He tends to stray towards fantasy a bit too much for my taste. Haven't read the Valis trilogy, but then I think it's the different world view that he has that puts me off sometimes.

BigGameHunter 08-04-2004 07:28:34

;)
VALIS is indeed a very difficult read. If you familiarize yourself with his mental state at the time, it's painful to see what must have been going on in his mind.

For my money "The Man in the High Castle" is his most accessible novel, but I really enjoyed "A Scanner Darkly" as well.

BTW, reading Le Guin's "Left Hand of Darkness" again. Amazingly good book with an extremely plausible and original gender neutrality theme.

Qweeg 08-04-2004 10:08:50

Top book that BGH, she crafts a good world. Still lookin to track down more of her Hain universe stuff.

BigGameHunter 08-04-2004 14:50:05

Wasn't aware she did more in that vein...though I love that book, she's not one of my favorite reads...haven't really given her the chance she deserves, which is shameful, as she is one of this city's residents.
Everyone should give "Noir" a shot-- author's last name is Jeter and he picked up on some of Dick's storylines with approval.

Qweeg 08-04-2004 14:58:56

She's said that her book 'The Lathe of Heaven' was based in Seattle (is it?) where she lives. That's also a top read.

RedFred 08-04-2004 18:39:56

Lathe of Heaven was a pretty good movie too. They sure didn't spend much money on SFX but if you liked the book it is worth a viewing.

Noisy, if you are a fan of Dyson, both son and father, I recommend the nonfiction semi-biographal A Starship and a Canoe

BigGameHunter 09-04-2004 15:27:54

Qweeg~ I live in Portland and last time I noticed she did as well...she's getting pretty old though...might not live here much longer!
And FYI, mistaking Portland for Seattle is sacrilege here.
It's like asking someone if she's a kid's grandma when she's really the mother you fucker!

jsorense 09-04-2004 16:58:10

I have just started P.D.James' "The Murder Room."
I've read most of her Dagliesh mysteries and have liked all of them.

Noisy 10-04-2004 09:24:02

Wow. I read the snapshot about Freeman Dyson in 'Q is for Quantum' by John Gribben, only to find out that he was born about five miles from where I live: I pass the village of Crowthorne twice a week on my journey oop North!

Coincidence? :hmm: I think we should be told.

Noisy 21-04-2004 08:42:00

Now reading 'Consciousness Explained' by Daniel C. Dennett. More later.

King_Ghidra 21-04-2004 09:07:27

I finished Eats, Shoots and Leaves, which despite some initial hesitation on my part came through very well. I would reccomend it.

Now reading 'The dark corridor', a Moorcock novella very similar sounding to Silent Running. Depressing as hell, but very atmospheric.

BigGameHunter 21-04-2004 21:00:23

Currently reading "Meditations in Green"...forget the author, but it is about a VietNam soldier and his disillusionment both in war and after.

Also "bit reading" several books on WWII, mainly commando operations...neat thing is, they are all published during the war.

King_Ghidra 08-05-2004 14:33:18

Andre Gide - The Immoralist

Goes up and down in quality but good so far. Not as hard hitting as something like J K Husymans' á rebours, but certainly important when seen in context.

BigGameHunter 08-05-2004 17:19:13

I've read that a couple of times...or started to, anyhow. Never could get completely through it...not very gripping, IMO.
For my money, the best books that evoke the same feeling and perspective are by Hermann Hesse, notably "Narcissus and Goldmund".
Check it out.

King_Ghidra 13-05-2004 08:23:50

Thanks for the tip BGH, although after suffering at the hands of the Glass Bead Game - which has got to one of the most overrated pieces of crap i have ever read - i am sceptical about picking up more Hesse.

At any rate, finished The Immoralist, enjoyed it very much.

Now reading A Russian Journal by Steinbeck with photos by Robert Capa. Basically a trip through 1947 Russia to write about ordinary Russian people and their lives wthout seeing it from a cold war perspective. So far so good.

BigGameHunter 17-05-2004 21:26:54

Wow...that's weird...I was just reading about Capa's D-Day photos today. Boy, that guy died a tragic end...and it's all the fault of the French!

I don't know if any Europeans would appreciate his work, but Stephen Ambrose (plaigarism claims aside) has written some excellent books about WW2 and US history in general.

My personal favorite is actually the book about Lewis and Clark's journey, "Undaunted Courage". If you've ever had an interest in this trip, get the book...made quite inviting in Ambrose's hands.

King_Ghidra@home 23-05-2004 19:09:25

While on holiday i also read Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami which was good, the first thing i have ever read by Murakami, who, if the critics are to believed, is one of the world's foremost novelists. At any rate, The End of the World is a kind of Neuromancer of the mind, a philosophical thriller, and very good.

But better than that was the other book i read on holiday, which was the absolutely brilliant Carter Beats The Devil by Glen David Gold. The fictionalised account of the life of real 1920's magician Charles Carter, the book rises far above the level of pseudo-biography to become a terrific thriller and a magnificent Great American Novel a la Don Delillo's Underworld. An absolutely stunning book on so many levels and i once again heartily recommend it to everyone.

BigGameHunter 08-06-2004 19:27:14

Finished "Meditations in Green". Did'nt care for it too much. I think it was lauded because it was by a vet about the war and people are too fawning over soldier/writers in the U.S.

Now reading "Young Men and Fire" by Norman Maclean, the author of "A River Runs Through It and other stories" (which the excellent--even Brad Pitt!!!--movie of the same name depicts).

Maclean haunted the same area my family owns a cabin in in Montana (western Montana) so it really resonates with me.
If you want a complete departure from what you may know, namely, fly fishing and nature communing in the U.S., I HIGHLY recommend it. He's like Hemingway, only much more poetic and insightful.

Anyhow, "Young Men and Fire" is about the early formation and tragic death of some Smokejumpers (forest fire paratroopers) in the Mann Gulch fire in Montana circa 1949.

It was edited and published posthumously, so it is a tad disjointed and not nearly as lyrical as "A River...." but the guy has such beautiful little gems in his writing you forgive it.

Check him out here:
http://www.press.uchicago.edu/Misc/Chicago/500667.html

Unregistered 08-06-2004 19:42:14

Robin Hobb

I would like to read some more, nap and than trip top the bookstore I am thinking

JM

BigGameHunter 08-06-2004 21:59:07

JM, you are the zennest trainwreck I've ever seen.

:clueless:

zmama 08-06-2004 22:14:04

He is an endless fascination.

Noisy 09-06-2004 08:21:34

Read one Robin Hobb. Boring as hell.

chagarra 09-06-2004 09:12:08

The liveship series wasn't a total disaster, like the farseer trilogy..

But then I'm a glutton for punishment.. Just read Hamiltons "Pandoras Star", with the usual disorientation....

jsorense 09-06-2004 20:33:27

Six Armies in Normandy; From D-Day to the Liberation of Paris
Keegan, John, (1982)

BigGameHunter 10-06-2004 08:50:38

Whoa! Just picked that up at Goodwill yesterday!!!! Is it any good?

jsorense 10-06-2004 16:37:52

BGH,
Yes, it is good, though not one of his best IMHO. It is nice, for me, to see some details about Operation Goodwood, and what the Canadians, Poles and French were contributing to the invasion and liberation. His reminiscence of life in the English countryside before the invasion was interesting too.
j

MOBIUS 11-06-2004 19:14:43

Currently reading (still!) The Good Soldier Švejk by Jaroslav Hašek, it is a satire of the ludicrous futility of WWI through the eyes of a soldier of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Qweeg 13-06-2004 19:48:47

Recently read:

Absolution Gap by Alistair Reynolds

Now reading:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon and Stormbringer by Michael Moorcock.

JM^3 13-06-2004 19:53:33

Zelanzy and Wolf (right now I am reading Peace by Gene Wolf, previously I was reading To Die in Itaber by Zelanzy, previous to that I was reading Fools Fate by Hobb)

Jon Miller

Immortal Wombat 13-06-2004 22:21:32

Currently "reading": Moby Dick, still
Currently started: Jane Eyre
Currently re-reading when bored of above: Swallows & Amazons series, HP5

King_Ghidra 14-06-2004 09:34:21

Quote:

Originally posted by MOBIUS
Currently reading (still!) The Good Soldier Švejk by Jaroslav Hašek, it is a satire of the ludicrous futility of WWI through the eyes of a soldier of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
marvelous book, absolutely hilarious and a must-read

it's the book that catch-22 wanted to be

BigGameHunter 15-06-2004 18:20:25

Currently reading "Midworld" by Alan Dean Foster...probably considered a cheapo "pulp" sci fi book back then, but it is really a vivid setting and action packed a la some of Heinlein's early mass produced novels.

Spartak 15-06-2004 20:28:40

The Humananx books are exceedingly cool.

paiktis22 15-06-2004 22:07:16

the next will be this (assuming i can find it but since the author was in thessaloniki, i probably should)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...458621-2696408

Darkstar 15-06-2004 22:18:53

As a child, I really loved the Pip and Flinx adventures.

King_Ghidra 16-06-2004 08:39:58

Oh i'm reading The Life of Pi at the moment.

It's good fun, kind of The Jungle Book meets The Old Man and the Sea.

Lazarus and the Gimp 16-06-2004 16:59:20

"Brewers Rogues, Villains and Eccentrics".

I'm looking for new filth material.

Eklektikos 16-06-2004 17:07:46

"Rubicon: The Triumph and Tragedy of the Roman Republic"

Rather gripping narrative history which I'm enjoying a lot.

fp@korea 17-06-2004 07:37:46

Quote:

Originally posted by King_Ghidra
I finished Eats, Shoots and Leaves, which despite some initial hesitation on my part came through very well. I would reccomend it.

I've read that too. Pretty good, light reading I thought.

I'm currently reading One Hundred Years of Solitude by G.G. Marquez. Pretty fucking great, really.

My g/f keeps pestering my to read Life of Pi, but I'm never in the mood for it. The prologue and the epilogue are good, though.

jsorense 22-06-2004 15:52:57

Michael Crichton's "Prey".
It is about run-away nanothech stuff. I can't help myself. :o

Funkodrom 22-06-2004 16:32:05

I've read that... can't remember anything about it.

jsorense 22-06-2004 17:02:38

Quote:

Originally posted by Funkodrom
I've read that... can't remember anything about it.
Hmmmm, that says something about the book or the condition of your brain.:coolgrin:

BigGameHunter 22-06-2004 17:36:10

Finished Midworld, which was great, but the ending seemed to rush to a hasty conclusion, which, oddly enough, seems to be the same case with the one I'm just about done with--"Wolfling" by Gordon R. Dickson.
Wolfling is good, and seems to be the material that Gene Wolfe may have based his Torturer series on and Lucas the whole lightsaber concept...
I'm getting into all of these 60's Del Ray type books (mainly I find the cover art really cool and the writers back then seemed stronger across the board) and really enjoying it. You can pick up some neat vintage books like this at Goodwill for about a buck all the time.
I think I'm going to read a recent SF writer's compilation I just bought next...also have a William Gibson Neuromancer followup? waiting to be read.

Sci Fi rules!!! If someone could indicate a couple of modern writers that have the legs the old one's did, I'd like that...I'm really not into all the technobabble and psycho-intrigue-cleverness that seems to abound and render authors indistinguishable from one another these days.

Darkstar 22-06-2004 17:45:42

Lucas light saber is just magic katanas... slice through anything. The fact that there is no blood is so that his movies maintain a PG rating.

Lucas ripped off cheap Japanese B-Movies and Westerns. He used to be a big Japanese-phile.

MDA 22-06-2004 18:47:01

Vernor Vinge caught my imagination in kinda the same way as a lot of those old SF books (Ursula Le Guin, Andre Norton, Arthur Clarke), but I was in middle school and J-high when I read those, so make of it what you will.

MDA 22-06-2004 18:47:33

Quote:

Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Oh i'm reading The Life of Pi at the moment.

It's good fun, kind of The Jungle Book meets The Old Man and the Sea.

I've heard that one was good.

Darkstar 22-06-2004 18:57:57

The Jungle Book, or the Old Man and the Sea?

Immortal Wombat 22-06-2004 21:14:01

I enjoyed the Life of Pi. It was a good story, highly ambiguous ending, which is always good.

Scabrous Birdseed 22-06-2004 21:43:05

I'm reading a brace of Dorothy L Sayers novels, and I'm constantly surprised at slangwords and clever turns of phrase I thought were modern turning up in the 1920s. "Fag", "Bloke", "Common or Garden" etc.

jsorense 22-06-2004 23:01:13

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Sci Fi rules!!! If someone could indicate a couple of modern writers that have the legs the old one's did, I'd like that...I'm really not into all the technobabble and psycho-intrigue-cleverness that seems to abound and render authors indistinguishable from one another these days.
BigGameHunter, if you haven't already read them, I, and many others here, highly recommend the scifi novels of Iain M. Banks. You have a treat in store for you my lad.:bounce:

Funkodrom 23-06-2004 08:36:00

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Hmmmm, that says something about the book or the condition of your brain.:coolgrin:
Or a bit of both. Or I haven't actually read it. :D

BigGameHunter 23-06-2004 22:16:23

I haven't read anything by Banks, but I will definitely pick something up next chance I get.
Maybe I'll start with his first book and read through if I like him...haven't done that with anyone since Bradbury, I think.

Angelhorns 23-06-2004 22:24:29

Quote:

Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
"Brewers Rogues, Villains and Eccentrics".

I'm looking for new filth material.

I have a book you may like called something like 'Goddesses, whores, slaves and wives- women in classical antiquity'

I'm really getting into Romans and Greeks since visiting Greece last year- its a good book and lots of filthiness resides within

Angelhorns 23-06-2004 22:27:17

I couldnt get into Life of Pi, and Banks is great at sci fi and straight fiction.
I also like Jeff Noon, whi isnt quite sci fi but probably has similar appeal- kind of futuristic punk or something
I'm currently reading Spies by Michael Frayn (who wrote theplay Noises Off which is FANTASTIC). Liking it so far but only one chapterin

BigGameHunter 23-06-2004 22:32:48

Everyone here must read Post Office by Charles Bukowski. Immediately.

MOBIUS 23-06-2004 23:21:08

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Everyone here must read Post Office by Charles Bukowski. Immediately.
Read it!

Albeit a looong time ago, so I might reconsider a reread...:)

I went through a Bukowski/Burroughs phase about a decade+ ago when they were both alive...

BigGameHunter 24-06-2004 00:48:51

I just saw "Bukowski: Born Into This"....a documentary on his life and loves.
My God that man was as ugly as sin on stick...but he was pretty damn good.

Angelhorns 25-06-2004 00:08:28

hate Bukowski, he's a misogynistic twat on a par with Henry Miller and Lord Byron but not as witty


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