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-   -   Wot iz u bin reedinge utt ve mowment? (http://www.counterglow.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5908)

King_Ghidra 13-09-2002 09:46:37

cbeast! :shoot:

King_Ghidra 13-09-2002 09:47:42

first ever one in the qweeg forum!! :D

*End Is Forever* 13-09-2002 11:16:20

At the moment I'm reading this thread.

MOBIUS 06-05-2003 23:02:34

I think this great thread needs to be resurrected!:)

I am currently reading 'No Logo' by Naomi Klein, which is an in depth and journalistic exploration of global branding...

Very good so far, though I'm only up to page 66

The book I read before was the excellent 'Stupid White Men' by Michael Moore, which is basically an expose of the men who run the US and ultimately much of the World - at turns hilarious, but your hysteria is tinged with a nervousness of a person who really would rather not find out all the myriad ways that the elite of the US are screwing their own country and the rest of the world in the pursuit of power and lining their pockets...:nervous:

The real scary thing is that although Moore is trying to shock and over dramatise, most of his sources are impeccable or at least highly respected...:eek:

Next up will be 'Fast Food Nation', hmmm could be a pattern developing here...:D

God I love libraries!:)

Debaser 06-05-2003 23:08:08

Hey, I just read No Logo too (well, 2/3rds of it, I just didn't have the energy to read it to the end.)

I'm currently reading The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart. It's very good.

Sean 07-05-2003 00:25:44

I’m reading ‘Footballers Don’t Cry: Selected Writings’ by Brian Glanville and a book about mazes.

King_Ghidra@home 07-05-2003 07:34:55

Quote:

Originally posted by Debaser
I'm currently reading The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart. It's very good.
I really liked the first hundred pages or so of The Dice Man but it tailed off really badly. I think it was a real lost opportunity, a great idea but taken in the wrong direction.

I'm still ambling through War and Peace. Only a couple of hundred pages to go, but i've got the day off sick so let's see what happens...

Eklektikos 07-05-2003 14:21:18

Currently reading the Koran, believe it or not. Usually on the tube on my way into work, getting off at Heathrow Airport with a suspicious looking bag... This may be evidence of a deathwish on my part.

MOBIUS 07-05-2003 15:04:09

Quote:

Originally posted by Debaser
Hey, I just read No Logo too (well, 2/3rds of it, I just didn't have the energy to read it to the end.)

Yeah, it is looking like a bit of a heavy read (p.91 now)...:nervous:

Rodgers 07-05-2003 17:17:35

I'm reading Das Boot - good stuff but all the tension is spoilt by having seen the film already. Second dissappointment with this novel/film - I bought the film recently and realised too late that it was the dubbed version rather than the subtitled version I had seen and loved. Bugger.

King_Ghidra@home 07-05-2003 17:21:53

dubbing is a terrible sin only acceptable in jackie chan movies

Sir Penguin 07-05-2003 19:10:16

Currently reading The Ringworld Throne, by Larry Niven. It's really dull so far.

I read the four Harry Potter books over the weekend. They do get better as you move along; I was pleasently surprised. The movies for the first two are nothing compared to their prosaic counterparts.

Previous to that I read Endymion. I didn't think it was nearly as good as Hyperion or The Fall of Hyperion, but nevertheless an acceptable blend of the standard messiah story and the standard travel down the river on a raft story.

Before that I read The Dragon and the Fair Maid of Kent, by Gordon R. Dickson. It really sucked ass, but I enjoyed it. The editor did an absolutely horrible job: misspellings, mixed up character names, and so on. Dickson tends to repeat his back story until you're sick of it (at least he does in this series; maybe it's a thing with kids' books). I thought the bit with opium saving everybody from the plague was hilarious.

SP

King_Ghidra@home 07-05-2003 19:41:47

Quote:

Originally posted by Sir Penguin

I read the four Harry Potter books over the weekend. They do get better as you move along; I was pleasently surprised. The movies for the first two are nothing compared to their prosaic counterparts.

SP

i ordered these the other day. my sister has been telling me pretty much what you just said

Darkstar 07-05-2003 21:25:09

I liked the Harry Potter series so far. Nice light fantasy stuff.

For a really good read, I heartily recommend 'Illegal Aliens' by Nick Pollotta & Phil Foglio. One of my all-time favorites. Its a comedy/SF Spoof starting out with first contact and works its way from there. Definately an all time favorite for me. Anyone that likes Spinal Tap should check this out, if they can even *STOMACH* Science Fiction. Because you'll love Illegal Aliens!

I recently read: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. If you like the Miles Vorkosigan series from Lois, you should probably check this out. Its in that story telling vein, only less manic. A good SF struggle novel for those not famaliar with Bujold's work. Moderate on the science, heavy on the characters and setting.

Also: The Spell of the Black Dagger [Book 6 of the Ethshar Series] by Lawrence Watt-Evans.
Black Dagger was ok. Not the worst in the series, but missing this in the series won't be counted as a crime either. It's a little scattered on character focus, and doesn't have that typical L W-E Ethshar of high fantasy (spectacularly beating the odds).

chagarra 08-05-2003 04:47:49

With due regard to Queeg's earlier comment on Hamilton's 'Fallen Dragon'
.....BULLSHIT....

This must be THE worst book I have read in the last three years.

Having picked it up at the airport, and expecting a reasonably read on the trip. I think I spent more time looking out the window, until I could get out the laptop and reread something vaugely entertaining.
I have now had it a week, and have read a third, basically all in the throne room since it seems to help the process immensely.
This when my usual reading time for a book of this size is overnight.
I will try to persevere if only to see if there are any nubbins of readable matter further on, after all he DID write the trilogy didn't he.
This appears to have been writen by a committee, with at least five seperate threads of consciousness. At least three of which are flashback. One specifically for wetdreamers.

I will add more on completion, if I can stand the pain.

Rodgers 09-05-2003 09:36:26

Anyone read any sci-fi by C J Cherryh? I always liked her stuff as it gave a pretty realistic view on the probable motives for space exploration and what life might be like for those who got involved in any possible colonisation of other worlds etc. She writes about labour disputes and suchlike - The Merchanter Universe stuff - ah well, if you havent then this makes it sound shit I suppose.

King_Ghidra 09-05-2003 10:06:17

do a seach on this forum rodgers, i remember some other people talking about cherryh before

Funkodrom 09-05-2003 10:11:25

Quote:

Originally posted by King_Ghidra@home
i ordered these the other day. my sister has been telling me pretty much what you just said
Yeah. You'll get through them a bit quicker than War and Peace as well I imagine. :D

I prefered the Phillip Pullman Dark Materials trilogy more though, as recommended by FunkyFingers

Darkstar 09-05-2003 20:59:35

Quote:

Originally posted by Rodgers
Anyone read any sci-fi by C J Cherryh?
Yeah, a good bit of us here, Rodgers. Do a search, as directed, and bump the threads. I think there have been a few, but I'm getting to that point on a friday where I am thinking about being home for the weekend. ;)

Dyl Ulenspiegel 13-05-2003 18:39:33

Recent readings:
Max Picard: Die Flucht vor Gott (what a load of crap)
Hardt/Negri: Empire (an even bigger load of crap, but somehow hilarious in its own way)
Dopsch ea: Geschichte Salzburgs I/1 and I/2 (about 1500 pages of our local history up to 1500 AD, and yes I found it interesting)

Waiting to borrow Stupid White Men from a friend.

Any other recommendations?

King_Ghidra@home 13-05-2003 19:07:19

I am still crawling through War and Peace, only a couple of hundred pages to go.

I am about to order Foundation Pit by Andrei Platonov, i don't really know too much about other than it is a kind of 1984ish anti-utopian tale, and some very promising reviews of it, e.g.

Geoffrey Hosking, Times Literary Supplement, Dec. 6, 1996
Certainly among the half-dozen or so most important works of fiction of the entire Soviet period.

Dyl Ulenspiegel 13-05-2003 19:17:37

I'd prefer historical fiction over science fiction at the moment.

Isn't War and Peace quite cumbersome to read?

King_Ghidra@home 13-05-2003 19:37:40

mine is divided into two volumes, 700-odd pages each, fits nicely in my jacket pocket :)

it is both a magnificent novel and a magnificent account of russian and european social and political life circa 1812

not to mention some very stirring and horrifying accounts of the chaos of battle in that era

Sean 15-05-2003 12:59:20

Quote:

Originally posted by Sean
I’m reading ‘Footballers Don’t Cry: Selected Writings’ by Brian Glanville and a book about mazes.
The Years of the Goldfen Fix is one of the most depressing things about football I have read. Most of the stuff here is good, though.

jsorense 16-05-2003 21:57:54

Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel" (1997/99)

chagarra 18-05-2003 03:59:42

To continue my rant..... regarding ‘Fallen Dragon’

After much struggle and procrastination I finally made a valiant effort and finished it... Still don’t know why I bothered.

If you like a lot of apparently disconnected short stories hung around a rather threadbare storyline, where you are unsure whether you are reading the main current thread, or a flashback, with or without the obligatory gratuitous teenage sex scene. This may be just the book for you.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m not against all gratuitous sex scenes, just the ones that detract from the story.


If you can, picture all the scene change chapters in the trilogy, thrown into a hat, picked out in random order, and then squeezed into a single volume. Somewhere in there is the main storyline, but which it is, without a chronological order; the choice is always in doubt. Maybe the suspense of WTF is he up to, is the main idea.

Yes, as any good editor would see, there were some good short story vignettes, unfortunately they were not in the majority, and with the readers mind going in ever decreasing circles like a mad rat up a drainpipe, trying to figure where this ‘outstanding’, in context, piece of writing fits the overall picture.
They are likely to be missed.

I have finally come to the conclusion that this book was written before the trilogy, and used as a base for the developement of the latter. Including the fact that he still has no idea on how to finish a story.

My recommendation....... For what it’s worth.

Save your money. If you feel you must read it, visit a free library.

chagarra

Noisy 18-05-2003 23:12:43

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel" (1997/99)
Just bought that as well, though I fear it will be some time before it reaches the top of the 'to be read' pile (45 books in plain sight, a bunch in a pile at my parents', together with a whole stack of 'part series' waiting to be completed before even getting on the pile)!

chagarra: I think your review of 'Fallen Angel' is pretty harsh. It's an exciting story; great ideas; good writing. The fact that the ideas may have been better expressed in a series of shorter books that concentrated on individual ideas doesn't altogether negate the entertainment value.

Chairman Yang 18-05-2003 23:35:09

"Om kriget" (Vom kriege, About the war) by Carl von Clausewitz. A bit like Sun tzu´s Art of War. Deals with warfare mostly dating back to the napoleonic wars.

chagarra 19-05-2003 03:08:05

Noisy.....
Come on it was a simple money grab, like Jordan's newer stuff.

It might have been a readable book if it was followable. Basicaly he's tried to do too much, and buggered up the good parts.

Exiting, Great, Good....... Hmmmmm
not in my definition..... Average maybe at best.

Immortal Wombat 24-05-2003 22:27:45

am reading: Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

This will be my 4th attempt at completing it. I think I'm going to make it this time, I'm over half way. I'm getting really slow though, I can't seem to absorb the words of this like I usually do, I'm finding myself reading it to myself in my head.

Pretty good though.

Noisy 31-12-2003 14:44:28

Just finished 'Guns, Germs and Steel' by Jared Diamond. It took me months, because although the ideas are engrossing, the repetitive presentation is turgid. I think the thesis (that 'Western' Empire-building success is not based on intelligence) is well developed and stands up, although I think I remember reading elsewhere that that there are some major critiscisms. Look at the Amazon.com reviews for some radically divergent views. I do recommend it, but add the caveat that it is not for the faint-hearted.

Now reading 'Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid' by Douglas R. Hofstadter, which will probably take me just as long to wade through.

Venom 31-12-2003 15:25:24

Turgid...:lol:

RedFred 31-12-2003 20:57:31

Quote:

Originally posted by Darkstar
...I recently read: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. If you like the Miles Vorkosigan series from Lois, you should probably check this out. Its in that story telling vein, only less manic. A good SF struggle novel for those not famaliar with Bujold's work. Moderate on the science, heavy on the characters and setting...

Yeah. I am liking Bujold to a surprising degree. I am trying to read that 'Volkswagen' series too but I am having trouble finding one of the books in the series.

If anyone out there likes historical fiction I can heartily recommend the latest trilogy by Neal Stephenson. It is good enough that I may do a review once I am done the first book. I don't think that the other two have been published yet.

Count me in amongst those who enjoyed Fallen Dragon. Although the ending was a bit cheesy.

Lady_of_Chicken 02-01-2004 19:34:16

I NEED SOMETHING TO READ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Something fast-paced. Something medieval would be cool. Or speculative. Lots of action.

Something I can enjoy and not have to think about.

An experience. Entertainment.

Something above a magazine level but below something I have to think too much about and pour carefully over the prose and wade trough the author's soapbox thinly veiled as characters and plot, yet engaging.

A good story by a good storyteller.

Is that too much to ask for? :D

jsorense 02-01-2004 19:56:18

Happy New Year Lady_of_Chicken.
Try "Timeline" by Michael Crichton. It reads like a screen play, I wonder why.

Lady_of_Chicken 02-01-2004 20:26:42

Okay, I will.

Beggars can't be choosers. :)

Happy New Year!

Noisy 03-01-2004 01:00:34

That's "pore ... over".

Ker-ching!

Happy New Year.

Lady_of_Chicken 03-01-2004 01:18:29

Lol! I wondered about that, but I thought--ew, that can't be rite. *wink*

See, I need to read for fun--brayne is mush. :)

chagarra 03-01-2004 10:36:32

If you can get hold of Eric Flint's Ring of Fire series, 1632 and 1633, it meets your criterion, they are well worth the read. Especially with the next one, 1634 The Galileo affair, about to be released soon.
I find it much easier, now that I have them in e-book format, to keep up with a lot of the new stuff.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm 04-01-2004 06:03:07

LoC ended up reading the comedy school diary I wrote when I was 15. She said she enjoyed it. I certainly enjoyed writing it!

SP: I wasn't aware there was a standard for books about "going down the river on a raft" except maybe Tom Sawyer.

DS: Illegal Aliens - is that anything like the movie Morons from Outer Space?

Noisy: I was recommended GEB: Eternal Golden Braid by a transhumanist who was talking about Bayesian cognitive science, and trying to write specs for superintelligent AI, so I borrowed it from the library. Three weeks wasn't long enough to be able to plough through the thing (well, not if you only read it during lunch breaks and are constantly interrupted) but it was fascinating nonetheless.

jsorense: LoC bought Timeline today, and is currently (like, right this second) engaged in reading it. I hope it's as good as you say, or I'll drive down to your place and demand our money back!

Noisy 04-01-2004 15:06:55

Yep, having started it on Dec 26th, I don't anticipate a completion date this side of Feb. Each segment takes two or three read-throughs, even though the writing style is clear as a bell.

As a filler, I've started 'A Maze of Death' by Philip K. Dick as well.

Scabrous Birdseed 04-01-2004 15:50:40

Well, the last five novels I've read have all been Ian Rankin detective books. They were generally okay, though wildly different in style. The last book I read was James Monaco's "How To Read a Film" which I found quite interesting, even though bits of it were outdated and pointless. I'm now able to use the phrase "mise en scéne" in everyday conversation, which is nice. :)

Currently reading... Coursework. Bummer. Once I'm done I think I'll tackle the last Rankin novel in the omnibus thingy or alternatively Peter Guralnick's Elvis biography.

jsorense 04-01-2004 18:40:51

Quote:

Originally posted by Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
jsorense: LoC bought Timeline today, and is currently (like, right this second) engaged in reading it. I hope it's as good as you say, or I'll drive down to your place and demand our money back!
:nervous:
I did put a qualifier in there Qaj.:nervous:

Darkstar 05-01-2004 21:14:04

Qaj... transhumanist? Was that... Anders, by any chance?

Illegal Aliens is a good, comedic, Sci-Fi that is light hearted and spoofs a lot of classic "Humans are always smarter then everyone else" space romps.

King_Ghidra 05-01-2004 23:34:36

Currently ploughing through more Moorcock (i have to hide the books from my gf because she finds the name Moorcock too funny)

I far prefer the more buccaneering style of his work in the 60's to the treacle-paced stuff from the 80's. This is somewhat ironic as as i understand it, Moorcock originally created Elric as an attempt to fight the tolkien esque standing around talking type traditional fantasy writing of the time, and yet he himself ended up writing in this style.

After i finish this i start on robert e howard and conan

Qweeg 06-01-2004 15:21:40

I liked Elric stuff as well, I always read it as a nice alternative take on the vampire angle, and all that chaos worship was refreshing change from doing the bidding of spindly poofs with big ears and over developed morals. Not a strange-attractor in sight though.

Scabrous Birdseed 06-01-2004 16:01:39

Quote:

Originally posted by King_Ghidra
After i finish this i start on robert e howard and conan
Yeah! I wish I still had them left to read, they're pure magic those short stories.

Fantasy Masterworks edition?

King_Ghidra 06-01-2004 16:10:13

that's the bunny :)

i think there's two voumes, i have no 1

jsorense 08-01-2004 21:05:04

Quote:

Originally posted by Lady_of_Chicken
I NEED SOMETHING TO READ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Something fast-paced. Something medieval would be cool. Or speculative. Lots of action.

Something I can enjoy and not have to think about.

An experience. Entertainment.

A good story by a good storyteller.

Is that too much to ask for? :D

Lady_of_Chicken, have you ever heard of the Brother Cadfael mysteries? There are a series of novels written by Ellis Peters about a 12th Century Benedictine monk who solves brutal crimes. Several to the stories were made into PBS's Mystery episodes.:)

Chairman Yang 09-01-2004 08:25:11

Battle of Kursk and A bridge too far. ww2 rulez.

RedFred 09-01-2004 20:00:03

I can give a solid two thumbs up to Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson. Not as funny as Snowcrash but what is?

Now I am part way through on book 2 of L.E. Modesitt Jr.'s Legacy series.

BigGameHunter 09-01-2004 20:26:24

I am reading a historical bit titled "Mutiny on the Globe" about a crazed New Englander in the early 1800's who slaughters his captain and attempts to build a fascist Utopia in the pacific islands.
Started off agonizingly slow but is starting to pick up a bit.

Noisy 10-01-2004 11:12:53

Now reading 'An Old Captivity' by Nevil Shute. Set in the 1930s, around a flying expedition to Greenland.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm 10-01-2004 18:45:13

DS: Anders Sandburg? Nope. It was on a Singularitarian mailing list, and more of a general recommendation to list members.

Cumber 11-01-2004 03:13:32

Currently reading Steven Brust's Jhereg serries (I think that's how it's spelt?). Right at this second in between Teckla and Taltos.

Darkstar 13-01-2004 07:42:32

Qaj, yep, the one and only. :)

Cumber, I dimly remember the Jhereg. How many books are in that setting/series now?

Noisy 17-01-2004 11:20:21

The Nevil Shute book was very good. Astounding view of how people saw the world before you could buy a ticket to virtually anywhere on the planet just by wandering to any number of travel agents in your local High Street.

Now reading 'Permutation City' by Greg Egan. First of his that I've read. This one explores artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

Lazarus and the Gimp 18-01-2004 14:51:33

"Riddley Walker"

Noisy 19-01-2004 12:31:31

I don't think I finished that, because I just couldn't get to grips with the way that the writing was presented, even though that was the whole point. Went to see the play at the Royal Exchange in Manchester.

Mr. Bas 19-01-2004 16:56:01

I finished both 'The catcher in the rye' by J.D. Salinger and 'Vernon God Little' by DBC Pierre a couple of weeks ago, I liked both a lot. After that, I haven't read much, not any books at least. I have a copy of The brothers Karamazov lying around, but I haven't started yet... The size of it is a bit intimidating.

King_Ghidra 19-01-2004 17:06:34

the prose is quite dense too. I'd suggest starting with the shorter dostoevsky stuff if you haven't read it already, e.g. crime and punishment.

Mr. Bas 19-01-2004 17:25:13

I haven't read anything by Dostoyevsky so far. I might check if the library have something shorter by him...

Lazarus and the Gimp 19-01-2004 20:36:51

Quote:

Originally posted by Noisy
I don't think I finished that, because I just couldn't get to grips with the way that the writing was presented, even though that was the whole point. Went to see the play at the Royal Exchange in Manchester.
I'm sorry, but the thought of you attempting to read "Riddley Walker" has actually left me helplessly weeping with laughter. I can imagine the author receiving a list of spelling corrections running to 20,000 words.

Noisy 19-01-2004 20:55:05

:D

jsorense 20-01-2004 16:19:19

Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far.

QtFLW@Work 20-01-2004 22:41:33

Noisy: What did you think of Permutation City?

Noisy 21-01-2004 00:45:06

Halfway through it, and yet I still feel as if I've yet to really get into it. It plays around with some areas that I'm getting interested in a bit more: consciousness and AI. I'm reading GEB (slowly), and I've just bought 'Consciousness Explained' by Daniel Dennett (but it may be a while until I get around to reading that).

BigGameHunter 21-01-2004 06:01:21

Well, if you like PK Dick and are interested in consciousness, you must have read "A Scanner Darkly" by now, right?
I can imagine the first self aware AI's having issues along the lines of the protagonist's.
Or, better yet, the Valis trilogy (the have it under one cover these days). Talk about an exploration of messed up psyche.

Sean 22-01-2004 16:08:59

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far.

I read the first two of their prequels and think you pretty much hit the nail on the head: mildly interesting. If you’ve read either of those, how does it compare?

I’m reading The Hard-Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World.

alsieboo 22-01-2004 20:02:34

just finished robert rankins 'hollow chocolate bunnies of the apocolypse' and just starting 'the witches of chiswick' by the same author

JM^3 22-01-2004 21:16:01

Quote:

Originally posted by Cumber
Currently reading Steven Brust's Jhereg serries (I think that's how it's spelt?). Right at this second in between Teckla and Taltos.
the best in this series is the phoneix guards

Jon Miller

Lazarus and the Gimp 22-01-2004 22:16:09

Finished "The Clerkenwell Tales" by Peter Ackroyd, and now starting "Riddley Walker" in earnest. It's very good.

jsorense 24-01-2004 08:26:56

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far.

Well I finally finished it. All and all, don't bother.
I thought the whole treatment of the "thinking machines' was totally off base.
The writhing was "hoo huum" but that isn't too surprising because most of Frank Herbert's writing was hoo huum too.

Scabrous Birdseed 24-01-2004 09:24:19

The Cambridge Companion to Crime Fiction. I'm... not entirely... sure exactly... why.

Lazarus and the Gimp 24-01-2004 15:09:54

The only crime fiction I've seriously read is Derek Raymonde. There was some unpleasant stuff in that man's head.

jsorense 27-01-2004 16:02:47

I ust started The Peacewar by Vernor Vinge (1984). I am on page 63 and enjoying it a lot so far.

Nills Lagerbaak 27-01-2004 17:34:12

Just finished the alchemist.

SOme interesting things in there. Very simply written, could be a fairy tale or something, but quite poignent

QtFLW@Work 27-01-2004 18:58:14

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
I ust started The Peacewar by Vernor Vinge (1984). I am on page 63 and enjoying it a lot so far.
I read that and the sequel a few weeks back. Good book(s). Though the end of "Marooned in Realtime" was a tad confusing at first read.

Qweeg 28-01-2004 11:45:15

I read that book, I really enjoyed the first story, and although I liked the concepts and ideas shown in the second story, I was really disappointed that Vinge seemed to abandon everything he'd built up for reader to care about from the first story (the characters, their world, what happened next etc).

QtFLW@Work 28-01-2004 16:32:10

Warning jsorense, warning! Spoilers ahoy!



The books were some of a few that addresses Vinge's concept of singularity, a point in time where technology advances to the point where if it was plotted on a graph, it would suddenly go straight up - a spike, of sorts, beyond which you can't even begin to imagine what society would be like.

The Peace War deliberately slowed the pace of technological advance from real-world levels (some estimates put a real-world Singularity as soon as 2020, as late as 2080 or beyond for really conservative estimates) so Vinge could tell a cool story :) without having to squash it all into a few decades (his perception of 'time until the Singularity' from the date the book was written).

Marooned... was supposed to have been a drastic break from the previous book, as it was trying to capture a possible outcome of a sudden Singularity on human society. The first book was pretty much just elaborate setup for the second book, trying to show what happened when the human race 'transcended' their humanity.


Vinge's Fire Upon the Deep was another tale that setup somewhat elaborate obstacles to a Singularity to tell a specific story.

jsorense 28-01-2004 20:50:36

Thanks for the comments guys.:)

I just finished and it was pretty good. However, it got to be a little too Ender's Game at the end for me. A book I think is way over rated IMHO.

Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.

Hmmm, I just noticed that Card published Ender's Game a year after The Peacewar. Oh, and they are making a movie of E'sG now.

Mr. Bas 29-01-2004 14:16:09

I still haven't had the courage to pick up Dosteyevski, so I started on I Jan Cremer instead. It's a pretty enjoyable book IMO.

Sean 30-01-2004 21:42:05

The Professor and the Madman.

jsorense 31-01-2004 19:58:37

The Korean War: The West Confronts Communism by Michael Hickey.
This is written by a Brit so that Commonwealth troops are highlighted. He is also happy to point out any U.S. shortcomings.
Refreshing.:)

Noisy 01-02-2004 12:12:53

Well, I've finished 'Permutation City' now. I must admit that I read it in rather a fragmentary fashion, and didn't pick up on the time jumping about in the first half of the book (because I hardly ever bother reading chapter titles), but I'm still not that impressed. It doesn't pass the test of whether I'd pass it on to my father to read, I'm afraid. I think it deals with pretty big concepts, but the answers are simplistic. I wouldn't tell people not to read it, but then again I wouldn't recommend it.

Sean 01-02-2004 12:15:48

Quote:

Originally posted by Sean
The Professor and the Madman.
Subtitled A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. Great read: I love Simon Winchester’s history books.

Noisy 07-02-2004 00:37:14

Now reading 'A Devil's Chaplain' by Richard Dawkins.

Vincent 07-02-2004 07:50:52

http://www.krimi-couch.de/images/boo...grosse-bob.jpg

Scabrous Birdseed 07-02-2004 09:33:05

I've grown a bit bored of The Cambridge Companion, currently reading Dance of Life: Popular Music and Politics in Southeast Asia by Craig A. Lockard.

Scabrous Birdseed 07-02-2004 20:03:58

I'm currently reading a text file containing a scene-for-scene description of the storyline of all the Resident Evil games.

Darkstar 07-02-2004 20:05:13

Scabby, that sounds like a serious cry for help! Should we dispatch the Betan Emergency Psych teams?

Scabrous Birdseed 07-02-2004 20:12:01

It's fascinating meta-literature in a way. You keep wanting to find out what happens next, yet there's no actual narrative in there. It's like a hyper-compressed suite of novels.

Lazarus and the Gimp 07-02-2004 20:39:08

"St Dunstan- his life, times and cult" by Prof. Lapidge.

BigGameHunter 08-02-2004 00:46:41

"House of Sand and Fog" by Andre Dubus III. Pretty good.

QtFLW@Work 10-02-2004 17:43:42

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.
The fact that I moved to California and then reread the book knowing the geography it was set it enhanced my appreciation of the book when I read it a few weeks back.

King_Ghidra 10-02-2004 17:56:09

Quote:

Originally posted by BigGameHunter
"House of Sand and Fog" by Andre Dubus III. Pretty good.
So what happened to Andre Dubus I and II? I think we should be told.

BigGameHunter 10-02-2004 22:52:25

They probably never existed. What nom de plume would be good as a "I" or a "II"?

Noisy 15-02-2004 09:45:56

Now reading 'Dead Air' by Iain Banks.

Qweeg 17-02-2004 11:47:24

Quote:

Originally posted by jsorense
Thanks for the comments guys.:)

I just finished and it was pretty good. However, it got to be a little too Ender's Game at the end for me. A book I think is way over rated IMHO.

Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.

Hmmm, I just noticed that Card published Ender's Game a year after The Peacewar. Oh, and they are making a movie of E'sG now.

Really... a movie of Enders Game you say?

Noisy 17-02-2004 12:56:02

Now reading 'The Last Three Minutes' by Paul Davies.


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