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The Bursar
03-12-2002, 23:00:46
That advert for One Live has a great piece of surprisingly mellow music in the background, and I've no idea what it is. :(

Scabrous Birdseed
03-12-2002, 23:36:48
Be it: http://www.commercialbreaksandbeats.co.uk/detail.asp?RecordingID=1637 ?

Asher
03-12-2002, 23:51:38
He wouldn't recognize "My Sacrifice" if it was played on a commercial? :hmm:

Scabrous Birdseed
03-12-2002, 23:54:25
I've certainly never heard it. Lemme download it off KazaA and check if that is it.

Asher
03-12-2002, 23:56:57
It's one of the most overplayed songs in recent memory in North America at least...

"Hello my friend we meet again
It's been awhile, where should we begin"
etc

Scabrous Birdseed
04-12-2002, 00:02:29
I don't listen much to commercial radio, and when I do it's Swedish. Where Creed are not popular. At all.

This song was used in the OTHER AD, the one with the jumping crowd. Sorry.

Scabrous Birdseed
04-12-2002, 00:05:32
Right, according to the BBC web site, the songs used in the series of ads are (or are going to be):

Sigur Ros - "Svefn-g-englar"
Creed - "My Sacrifice"
Groove Armada - "Remember"
Death In Vegas - "Girls"

Find the correct one yourself.

Asher
04-12-2002, 00:05:34
That would explain why you're only really aware of obscure music, really.

Such a shame -- a lot of the songs they play on commercial radio are good and for that reason they became very commercial. A lot of obscure music we never hear from since it sucks

Scabrous Birdseed
04-12-2002, 00:08:28
True and true. And as you may have noted in the other thread, I'm far from the most willfully obscure person on this site. Stop accusing me of this!

Asher
04-12-2002, 00:11:28
Anyone who lives in Europe has obscure musical tastes automatically, though. :hmm:

Funkodrom
04-12-2002, 09:24:24
Oh god. Luckily Creed aren't on the radio here!

PosterBoy
04-12-2002, 09:27:10
I only have an obscure music taste because I like predominatley american bands/artists not widely known over here, or probably there.

Asher
04-12-2002, 09:27:33
Like?

The Bursar
04-12-2002, 18:23:41
Thanks Snappy :)

Provost Harrison
04-12-2002, 20:42:46
Originally posted by Asher
That would explain why you're only really aware of obscure music, really.

Such a shame -- a lot of the songs they play on commercial radio are good and for that reason they became very commercial. A lot of obscure music we never hear from since it sucks

You are joking right? The reason songs get played all the time on radio is because the big corporations peddle their crap and pay commercial radio to play them. Alas, many people are too suggestible to see through this...I can honestly say that the local commercial station where I am (Viking FM) manage to successfully avoid talent with amazing prowess pandering to the tasteless fishwife instead...

Sean
04-12-2002, 21:19:53
Originally posted by The Bursar
Thanks Snappy :)
So which one was it?

The Bursar
04-12-2002, 22:33:30
The Death in Vegas one prompted the thread, but The Creed one is good too.
Haven't got the other 2 yet.

Incidentally, the Creed one sounds just like track 6 on LWP3-2 at the beginning. But then it goes downhill.

Scabrous Birdseed
04-12-2002, 22:38:32
I think both of you are right. Or wrong. There's a lot of "commercial" music that's just reprocessed cack, made by marketting executives not musicians. There's also an (admittedly smaller) group of commercial hits that are hits because they're so bloody good they force themselves onto the public conciousness, have so many nice hooks and things that they overcome the public's apparent distaste for anything extraordinary by being so sheerly listenable.

To take two examples from an area I know a bit about, Dancehall, "It Wasn't Me" by Shaggy would be an example of the former, a song so far removed from the original style, so... bowdlerised as to be entirely harmless and crap. Whereas "Gimme The Light" by Sean Paul (#13 this summer in the US) is a real hardcore Dancehall tune that was a massive hit in Jamaica a few months earlier and gradually worked its way up underground Hip-Hop DJs' playlists until it grew into a minor sensation and he was signed over to a Major.

Sean
04-12-2002, 22:52:32
Don’t bother with Svefn-G-Englar, it still baffles me why they open with it when anyone who hasn’t heard it before hates it.

The Bursar
04-12-2002, 23:01:52
Sounds like a laugh then.

The Bursar
04-12-2002, 23:14:51
on second thoughts, 9mb? no

Asher
05-12-2002, 00:08:11
Provost Harrison: I don't consider that category music. That is pure business. :D And the likes of Britney Spears, N'Sync, etc.

But the real standout songs tend to be commercial successes. If they're not, they're not good enough for the majority of people, so whether you think it's absolutely brilliant doesn't mean a damn thing since you're in the minority.

That's why music critics amuse me so much.

Too many of them hate something BECAUSE it is popular and go out of their way to find obscure things and rant and rant about how it's the second coming, and everyone else has shit for taste.

Asher
05-12-2002, 00:10:28
Music critics also forget the point of what they're doing, or perhaps just their audience, because when I read reviews which say stuff like "oh the blahblahs did this kind of stuff years ago, this band is unoriginal and hence crap."

There's more fucking to it than originality. Music is about what you want to listen to. Whether it's vaguely similar to a song by another band in the 60s doesn't mean a damn thing to me -- I either like the song or I don't.

The critics who don't rate the music and rate the politics behind records are a disgrace, and this covers about 99% of all critics.

Sean
05-12-2002, 00:27:13
:lol:.

Debaser
05-12-2002, 00:35:00
So you think a critic is there to point out what songs are currently popular? Surely people can work that out for themselves. You have to remember that 90% of people don't really give a fuck about music, and their idea of a good song is basically their current favourite from the limited selection available on the radio or MTv or whatever. Critics are usually employed besause they are music geeks, people with a real in depth knowledge of a particular period of musical history (eg 70's or 80's), or a particular genre. They are there to be critical, and offer an original informed opinion on something. You must realise that the charts there days are mostly about what song has the best marketing campaign. Most music critics are 25-40 year old men, they're never going to like charty type pop songs because they are written for kids to spend their pocket money on.

Oh, and your point about critics saying things are crap if they are unoriginal. Bollocks. Look at the Strokes, look at the White Stripes, look at the Von Bondies. I doubt any of them would claim to be paticularly original. do the critics hate them?

Asher
05-12-2002, 01:12:17
Critics are usually employed besause they are music geeks
This brings me to another good point. Music geeks shouldn't be doing reviews unless they're reviewing it for other music geeks. Likewise, computer geeks shouldn't be writing software reviews -- the reviews should come from the POV of your average consumer, unless it's a hardcore techie site.

They are there to be critical, and offer an original informed opinion on something.
I don't think most critics have any musical talent at all, so their opinion on anything is pretty useless...They're just whiners who can't get their own musical careers to go anywhere and think they have an opinion to tell other what to do. There's a reason they haven't gone anywhere musically, remember. :D

You must realise that the charts there days are mostly about what song has the best marketing campaign.
In the pop segment, definitely.
In rock, for instance, it's not so much. Most of the songs on my local rock station come from smalltime Canadian bands with $0 marketing budget...

We've been hearing Nickelback since ~1996ish. ;) They got big not through marketing campaigns, but through putting out album after album and more and more people knew about who they were.

Oh, and your point about critics saying things are crap if they are unoriginal. Bollocks. Look at the Strokes, look at the White Stripes, look at the Von Bondies. I doubt any of them would claim to be paticularly original. do the critics hate them?
Hell if I know, but I think they're crap.
Not because they're original or unoriginal, but because:
The Strokes -- Just boring. The vocalist needs some lessons, and badly, he needs to put something into the lyrics. He sounds like he's being forced to sing at gunpoint.
The White Stripes -- Can anyone in this band play an instrument? I like songs that are more than simple melodies and crap lyrics.
Never heard of the Von Bondies.

Asher
05-12-2002, 01:20:22
Here's a perfect example of why I hate music reviews. From Rolling Stone, they gave the album 3 out of 5 stars, but didn't say a damn negative thing about it. WTF?

Practically every radio-rock band that's not rap metal or punk sounds like a louder version of Matchbox Twenty. So it's to be expected that the real thing would crank up its guitars. Surprisingly, Rob Thomas and cohorts have managed to improve upon and diversify their familiar blend of classic rock and alterna-rock lite on More Than You Think You Are. Having proved on their last album -- 2000's quadruple-platinum Mad Season -- that their monster 1996 debut, Yourself or Someone Like You, wasn't a fluke, the quintet no longer comes across desperately commercial or deadly earnest. Co-written by Mick Jagger, the disco-rock romp "Disease" evokes vintage INXS, while more typical tracks such as "Soul" possess a finesse that the band's previous power ballads lacked. Matchbox Twenty now seem almost dignified, a fact that is as much a tribute to their advancing abilities as it is to how shamelessly their sellout successors suck.
BARRY WALTERS
(RS 911 December 12, 2002)

Funkodrom
05-12-2002, 09:43:29
Dunno what the rating system in Rolling Stone is but in Kerrang 3Ks is a good album, 4 is really good and 5 is revolutionary and genre defining. So you get a lot of 3K reviews which isn't a bad review, it's a good score, just not a great one.

Debaser is right about critics. Most people don't have the depth of musical experience to know if something is really good or not. Take Nickelback as a classic example at the moment. The main thing that's wrong with them, other than Chad Kroeger's annoying voice, is that they are utterly clinical and average in everything they do. They've distilled down the sound of a whole genre into a few 'catchy' tunes that they have calculated people will like. (See if you can find an article with Chad "Cunt" Kroeger describing what a songwriting genius he is because he can basically write a formula for a song that will be really popular with the general public. There are a few.)

So the average music punter who doesn't really know anything about rock will hear the Nickleback song on the radio and think, oh, that's quite good, I'll buy that. Wheras the rest of us who've got most of the really good, strong, passionate albums that they've plundered are screaming NO! Don't buy that, buy these 10 albums that are kind of similar but they are the original stuff that he's ripped off and about a million times better! Problem is your average music punter will never have any exposure to Alice in Chains or whoever so they just aren't aware what it is that is lacking. Either that or they don't care. They don't want the music to be challenging or emotional, they just want a 'nice' tune to listen to.

PosterBoy
05-12-2002, 13:05:44
Originally posted by Asher
Like?

Chris Mills, Hawksley Workman, mostly alt country stuff

Sean
06-12-2002, 15:45:41
This brings me to another good point. Music geeks shouldn't be doing reviews unless they're reviewing it for other music geeks. Likewise, computer geeks shouldn't be writing software reviews -- the reviews should come from the POV of your average consumer, unless it's a hardcore techie site.
True. Game reviews, on the other, more relevant, hand, should be done by people who know games. If you’ve never played Pro Evolution Soccer you might think that FIFA is a really good football game; if you haven’t got the knowledge and background to know what you’re talking about, the reviews will be unconvincing. I’m reminded of the quote by Hemingway:
‘If a writer of prose knows enough about what he is writing about he may omit things that he knows and the reader, if the writer is writing truly enough, will have a feeling of those things as strongly as though the writer had stated them. The dignity of movement of the iceberg is due to only one-eighth of it being above water. The writer who omits things because he does not know them only makes hollow places in his writing.’

I don't think most critics have any musical talent at all, so their opinion on anything is pretty useless...They;re just whiners who can't get their own musical careers to go anywhere and think they have an opinion to tell other what to do.
Critics are supposed to know what they’re talking about and write/talk about it in an entertaining way. Just because someone has no talent for creating music, doesn’t mean they don’t have a talent for listening to music.

In rock, for instance, it's not so much. Most of the songs on my local rock station come from smalltime Canadian bands with $0 marketing budget...
Because they fit the current trends?

We've been hearing Nickelback since ~1996ish. ;) They got big not through marketing campaigns, but through putting out album after album and more and more people knew about who they were.
Also translates to: slowly rounding off any edge their songs might have had to make them acceptable for mass media.

Funkodrom
06-12-2002, 15:47:59
That's not even speculation, that's what Chad Kroeger thinks his 'talent' as songwriter is.

Debaser
06-12-2002, 15:51:25
I know they were quite big before, but doesn't having a song on the Spiderman OST count as mass marketing?

Funkodrom
06-12-2002, 15:52:57
That wasn't them though, that was just Chad the cunt and some other people.

Debaser
06-12-2002, 15:54:05
Really, I stand corrected. Can't have harmed their worldwide profile though.

Funkodrom
06-12-2002, 15:54:55
Hero - Chad Kroeger (feat. Josey Scott)

Asher
06-12-2002, 16:43:48
Originally posted by Sean
Because they fit the current trends?
Because the government mandates it. :smoke:
Certain percent must be Canadian content... :D

Sean
06-12-2002, 17:06:20
So do you get Godspeed You! Black Emperor tracks on your radio stations?

Asher
06-12-2002, 21:56:48
Have you been eating those mushrooms you found again?

Provost Harrison
07-12-2002, 00:23:15
No, he asked do you get Godspeed You Black Emperor on your radio stations? I don't see anything "mushroomy" about that :p

The Bursar
07-12-2002, 00:37:46
Just heard the Groove Armada one. It blows

Provost Harrison
07-12-2002, 12:52:32
The Groove Armada what?

Asher
08-12-2002, 08:50:04
Hilarious: http://www.dictionaraoke.org/freem3u/Creed-my_sacrifice.m3u

(Give it a minute to start the vocals)

Funkodrom
08-12-2002, 11:38:11
That's so much better than the original.

Immortal Wombat
04-06-2003, 20:48:52
Originally posted by Sean
Don’t bother with Svefn-G-Englar, it still baffles me why they open with it when anyone who hasn’t heard it before hates it.
I just bought that album. :beer:

Sean
04-06-2003, 21:19:25
Oh, the album is top, I love it. I just don’t know why they open the album and their live shows with Svefn-G-Englar.

MattHiggs
15-06-2003, 12:08:26
I really like My Sacrifice song. Still in my CD Changer in the car.