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Qweeg
18-07-2002, 13:31:07
(Explanation: The title has been arranged for 'Annoy Noisy' purposes, and translates to "What are you reading at the moment?")

Currently, I iz bin reedinge

Guns, Germs & Steel

by Jared Diamond.

This is a good book, its actually a scientific/historic/anthrapological book, and I don't usually read this kind of stuff- I'm not really a reading kind of guy, I only ever open books at all in order to get at the juicy succulent story contained within- so academic texts, lacking any plot- aren't usually my thing.

But this one's good, I recommend it.

Funkodrom
18-07-2002, 13:33:50
I just finished the Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman, see thread on this board. Excellent. I heartily recommend it. Much more imaginative than a lot of grown up fantasy.

DaShi
18-07-2002, 13:59:09
Damn German thread titles! :mad:

Guy
18-07-2002, 14:50:45
Just finished For Kings and Planets by Ethan Canin, haven't decided what's next yet. Probably some Ursula K. LeGuin, though, got a few from her that have been sitting in my reading pile for awhile.

For Kings and Planets is well written and enjoyable, but not terribly compelling. Good for unwinding at the end of a day and falling asleep to, and I learned some things about farming and architecture from it. That's not exactly a glowing review, is it? :)

FunkyFingers
18-07-2002, 14:51:29
Funko, glad you enjoyed the Dark Materials triology, I certainly was very impressed with them when I read them - I too heartily recommend all three books. Really imaginative, and a lot "deeper" than you might imagine actually.

Nav
18-07-2002, 16:41:29
Apart from reading Redemption Ark in the evenings (halfway through.. excellent).

My current Train book is 'Boo Hoo' an account of the internet company Boo.com's path from creation to catastrophe. It's a little bit too detailed, and has to be the first ever book I've read that has been recommended by the Financial Times!! Interesting stuff though!

Sean
18-07-2002, 17:18:14
I just ‘read’ a Calvin & Hobbes ‘book’ (the snow goons one). It’s so very very funny. Apart from that, I am still trying to get my head round Hemingway.

FunkyFingers
18-07-2002, 20:30:34
I've just bought The Lord of the Rings, so I shall shortly be embarking on reading that. I'm having a few days off reading books though after finishing Redemption Ark.
That was a good book - a worthy successor to Revelation Space and Chasm City certainly.

Noisy
19-07-2002, 07:55:29
Finally finished 'Darwin's Dangerous Idea' by Daniel C. Dennett. Brilliant first two thirds, but the last third is a killer, and took me weeks. Philosophy is very heavy stuff. If you have even the remotest interest in evolution, then you must read this book.

Diamond's book is on my 'to buy' list, but it will have a while, I'm afraid.

Just moved on to 'Tyranolopis' by A. E. van Vogt, which is just another of his pot-boilers. I need the light relief.

Oh, and Qweeg, :p:.

King_Ghidra
19-07-2002, 08:20:53
Originally posted by Sean
I just ‘read’ a Calvin & Hobbes ‘book’ (the snow goons one). It’s so very very funny. Apart from that, I am still trying to get my head round Hemingway.

:beer: on both counts:

calvin & hobbes is genius

i've read a fair amount of hemingway (for whom the bell tolls, farewell to arms, death in the afternoon, to have and have not, the sun also rises, and a lot of the short stories) and i think they're all fantastic.

I'd put him right up there as one of the greatest authors of the 20th century

Funkodrom
19-07-2002, 11:10:45
For whom the bell tolls is by Metallica not Hemmingway. :rolleyes:

Sean
19-07-2002, 11:18:11
King_G: really? I hate Hemingway, or at least his short stories. The Old Man and the Sea was tripe. I bought For Whom the Bell Tolls and A Farewell to Arms with some gift vouchers. The start of FWtBT has not encouraged me, either, although I would say the same about Siddhartha, which is brilliant.

Spartak
19-07-2002, 14:15:14
Just finished King iof Dreams by Robert Silverberg. Quite trashy and not a patch on earlier masterworks like "Dying Inside" but still good going to sleep reading....

Qweeg
19-07-2002, 14:25:51
Originally posted by Funkodrom
I just finished the Dark Materials Trilogy by Philip Pullman, see thread on this board. Excellent. I heartily recommend it. Much more imaginative than a lot of grown up fantasy.

I'm gonna havta have a look for this lot- two Funk*s cant be wrong:)

King_Ghidra
19-07-2002, 14:53:34
Originally posted by Sean
King_G: really? I hate Hemingway, or at least his short stories. The Old Man and the Sea was tripe.

Oh, i forgot, i've read that too, I thought it was great. :D

it's funny you mention that, because i was just about to post and say that currently, i am reading Moby Dick (this is my third stab at it - it is unbelievably fucking dense)

If you don't like hemingway that's a pity, i genuinely think he is a brilliant writer. His stories avoid all the bullshit of heroism and glamour and talk of a world in which people do what they have to and what they can do and love and die doing it.

Between him and Graham Greene the essence of modern tragedy has been realised.

walruskkkch
19-07-2002, 16:53:54
Harry Turtledove, American Empire -- the Center cannot hold.

The Shaker
19-07-2002, 18:22:46
Another Stephen Lawhead book.
But everyone hate him so I won't mention it :)

jsorense
19-07-2002, 19:46:51
:rolleyes:
Would you believe "Gettysburg the Second Day" by Harry W. Pfanz?
:eek:

Sean
19-07-2002, 19:59:36
No. Would you?

jsorense
19-07-2002, 20:39:17
:gotit:
Maybe it was the TV-Guide instead.
:o

Qweeg
20-07-2002, 13:35:57
Originally posted by walruskkkch
Harry Turtledove, American Empire -- the Center cannot hold.

This sounds interesting, I looked it up in Amazon.com and its alternate-history type stuff. Almost tempted to get a read of this too.

Snapcase
27-07-2002, 21:00:51
Bah! You're only meant to read one thing during the summer: ridiculous, thick detective novels set in England and written by slightly smug female authors. Heathens!

Just finished A Traitor To Memory by Elisabeth George, now reading Devices and Desires by PD James.

Noisy
28-07-2002, 00:05:52
Finished the van Vogt; read 'Wild Horses' by Dick Francis (which I realised was a re-read when I got two chapters into it); and have now started 'The Inflationary Universe' by Alan H. Guth.

HELP! HELP! I'M DROWNING!

Oh, and Snapcase, if you want quintessential English detective stories, look out for a guy called Michael Innes. He's probably not in print any more, so you'll have to scour second-hand book stalls for Penguin paperbacks of his. In my opinion, his writing style is one of the finest I've come across. I would imagine that most other people would find it quite mannered, though.

Vincent
29-07-2002, 14:33:39
Originally posted by jsorense
:rolleyes:
Would you believe "Gettysburg the Second Day" by Harry W. Pfanz?
:eek: You sure mean "Sid Meier's Gettysburg the Second Day"

jsorense
29-07-2002, 20:35:46
Own goal.
:)

MOBIUS
30-07-2002, 02:34:45
Currently, I iz bin reedinge

'Cryptonomicon' by Neal Stephenson

I am about a quarter of the way through (it's a huge book!), but it's basically a story set both in WWII and the present day. It is based on Cryptology, exploring the creation of believable bell curves of 'Randomness', after successfully utilising ENIGMA data in order to prevent the enemy from suspecting that their codes have actually been broken...


Stephenson is a brilliant writer whom people have either never heard of, or know intimately well...

His most famous book is 'Snowcrash', of the William Gibsonesque Cyberpunk genre.

MDA
30-07-2002, 21:08:29
MDA
Currently reading:
Thread: Wot iz u bin reedinge utt ve mowment?

MDA
30-07-2002, 21:09:03
there, finished it. bit of a let down really, especially the ending.

jsorense
30-07-2002, 22:02:21
MDA,
I agree with you. What annoyed me the most were the totally unbelivable characters.
Total rubbish.:mad:

MDA
01-08-2002, 19:42:25
Originally posted by jsorense
MDA,
I agree with you.

Careful, you'll end up sandwiched between two large, sweaty men with syringes full of haldol.:eek:

Debaser
04-08-2002, 01:51:56
Originally posted by MDA


Careful, you'll end up sandwiched between two large, sweaty men with syringes full of haldol.:eek:


Didn't know you'd met Funko.:vom:

Qweeg
06-08-2002, 11:37:32
This week- I has mainly been reading:

Rogue State: A Guide to the World's Only Superpower

by Some Guy... er, I mean William Blum

America is Predetory, and no defender of the weak, extensive and repeated use of chemical/biological and radioactive weapons against those humans that get in its way should serve as a warning to others. Its notorious inteference unit the CIA, and the intelligence unit the NSA, and various other coersive bodies such as the NED (National Endowment for Democracy) have been stamping American interests deep into the flesh of the world in a multitude of scary ways for a long time now.

You don't believe me- Rogue State conveniently lists the documents of proof.

It may be shocking (should you decide to read this well bibliographied book) to discover that in many instances America didn't just accidently work with so called unsavouries whilst trying to bring about 'democracy', it actually created the many unsavouries (most notably in South America) teaching them to torture, to target dissident families, various methods of assasination etc- as well as providing chemical weapons to Saddam and encouraging him to use them.

Americas atrocities in Nicaragua and El Salvadore and Granada are well documented (if not completely) by Rogue State- and its chilling biological warfare attacks against Cuba (its agriculture as well as its human population) makes for deeply unsettling reading.

Although I've always suspected Americas mission statement was to forward the Causes of the Rich World Wide and create and support brutal fascist states whenever possible whilst victoriously re-writing history to make it look like it is the champion of free people everywhere- I still came away from reading this document feeling cold and scared. It kind of reminded me of that bit in Nineteen Eighty Four when Winstons torturer describes to him the world view of the state of Oceana's leadership "Imagine a boot, smashing down on a human face, forever and ever and ever" or something like that anyway.

America is a dictatorship- it just does most of its dictating in foreign policy. The record of US veto-voting in the UN read like a a story I once saw called The Bully, were America seems to be against improving mankinds lot internationaly on General Principal.

If I seem Anti-American now, thats coz it seems like the rational attitude to take.

Having said all that- I'd also agree with this:

-And one last nit picking item, the premises of the book is the overall U.S. foreign policies that negatively effect other nations in the world, therefore I did not think the author should have kept throwing in internal American police force items and internal military staffing items. They were interesting, but would be better suited in another book. It left me with the impression that he was trying to beef up the book with any anti government / establishment comments he could find. At one point I thought we were going to fall into the whole anti gun control / Ruby Ridge - Waco arguments.

Live Long and Obey.

Qweeg
07-08-2002, 12:39:42
That was last week- this week I has begin to reading:

Fallen Dragon

By Peter F. Hamilton

I only just started reading this. So far its interesting, although the guy sometimes lets technologies and histories get in the way of moving the plot forward.

Actually some early chapters of the story are so reminiscant of something I wrote before I'd read this its offputting. You probably won't have the same trouble.

Blue-grass and rich-kids :rolleyes:
I guess tearing up copies of stuff I wrote and waving a bottle around whilst out of my nut on alcahol and smashing stuff up and having to be restrained by concerned friends and shouting words like "POINTLESS DERIVATIVE FUCKING CRAP!" at the top of my voice whilst in the throws of one of my many angst ridden creative rages now has much more of a context.

Seems like an alright book though, so far.

(ps- I wuz joking, I've never had a 'Creative Rage' in my life)

Venom
07-08-2002, 13:25:50
Good to see you've locked yourself in this forum again Qweeg.

jsorense
07-08-2002, 20:21:47
This one's for you Qweeg :)

"Political Science"
(Randy Newman)

No one likes us-I don't know why
We may not be perfect, but heaven knows we try
But all around, even our old friends put us down
Let's drop the big one and see what happens

We give them money-but are they grateful?
No, they're spiteful and they're hateful
They don't respect us-so let's surprise them
We'll drop the big one and pulverize them

Asia's crowded and Europe's too old
Africa is far too hot
And Canada's too cold
And South America stole our name
Let's drop the big one
There'll be no one left to blame us

We'll save Australia
Don't wanna hurt no kangaroo
We'll build an All American amusement park there
They got surfin', too

Boom goes London and boom Paree
More room for you and more room for me
And every city the whole world round
Will just be another American town
Oh, how peaceful it will be
We'll set everybody free
You'll wear a Japanese kimono
And there'll be Italian shoes for me

They all hate us anyhow
So let's drop the big one now
Let's drop the big one now

Qweeg
08-08-2002, 15:04:37
Randy Newman- he the same guy who sang "I'm different"? (don't care who knows it)

After reading Rogue State jsorense, that song you posted seems.... silly, like a Stalinist Russian writing a song about how even though they crushed the Nazi's and try to make a society where everything is free and fair- everybody else still thinks their an evil empire so lets just shrug an nuke em all.

Truth is your average American is wysiwyg, (worrying in Venoms case) but the American Political/Industrial/Military machine is ruthless- expansionist and power-hungry, becouse the American positions-of-power game ensures that only those who play that way get to win (and become President or CEOs and directors of intelligence agencies and security think-tanks etc)

Yanks often ask why come their're always going in and saving countries and are always there whenever their's trouble- risking American lives for some ungrateful foreigner. Its not coz the US is the worlds policman, its becouse in those cases you're invading, aquiring military access, securing oil resources, supporting pet regimes, expanding your hegemony and crushing the enemies of American foreign policy... that's all.

Full Spectrum Dominance and middle-man political imperialism requires always being everywhere. Super-Carrier diplomacy I spoze you could call it:)

Your media is too government-obediant and introverted to let you (as an American) have any real insight into whats really going on in the world or what American position in relation to others really is beneath all the freedom and democracy spin so... I understand.

Only one country won the second world war- America, other countries just survived without actually being occupied (like Britain) not bad considering the US had no natural desire to fight Nazi's in the first place. Since then- what with Nato (the hegemony protection army) and the Cold War- the States have gone from strenth to strenth. Now the 'threat' of world communism (or just 'some-socialism' in non-hegemony nations) is gone, drug-dealers and Terrorists have conveniently appeared as if from nowhere (not including the terrorists working for American interests of course). This allows America to keep the 'common-enemy' rule of overlordship up to date.

And soon the US will have projection in Iraq, and get all that loverly juicy oil, and setup military-bases 'to protect regional freedom' etc.

Acrtually I'm impressed, I want to see a stratergy game where every winning stratergy employed by the US can be used, Civ3, Smacx and Civ2 didn't quite cover all US patented routes to victory. (really, I mean it- a game like that would really be coool!)

ps- I have locked myself in here to reduce the amount of exposure to distracting time sucking threads I get dragged into in the rest of this place. This won't last of course.

Damn, I've hijacked my own damn thread!

jsorense
08-08-2002, 16:19:11
:)
Hi Qweeg,
It is always nice to read your comments. Yes, it is the same Randy Newman. The guy has written many many fine songs and movie scores, too many to list here. I posted the lyrics to "Political Science" because it reflects the attitude of most people from the U.S. that do not have a clue about the real motivations of our foreign policy. Most people are clueless about how devious we have been.
Notices that I didn't spew the common notion by many apologists that the U.S. is just doing what past empires have done cough G.B. cough so why don't you get of our backs. We should have / should be trying to do better. I did like Jimmy Carter's policy of linking foreign to human rights even if it did have alternative motives.
Well, this has all been argued before, but it is always interesting.
So, cheers dude, and have a nice weekend.
:beer:

Qweeg
08-08-2002, 16:26:17
You too buddy, and forgive me please- I've recently been Radicalized, it'll wear off in another coupla weeks or so.

Qweeg
08-08-2002, 16:32:13
Originally posted by jsorense
:)
Hi Qweeg,
It is always nice to read your comments....

oh:)

*starts blinking alot with pleased smile on face becous flattery will get you almost everywhere*

jsorense
08-08-2002, 16:34:24
:)
There is no reason for you to apologize to me or anyone else.
BTW, I am going to rent LoTR: FoTR tonight. Ohhhhh, a 10 minute trailer for "The Two Towers."
Later Radical Dude.

Lady_of_Chicken
11-08-2002, 00:33:10
Ha! Hemingway's short stories rule! I love the Nick Adams' stories especially. I like what Hemingway does with dialog and what he doesn't do that conveys so much.

Graham Greene. I did pick up one of his books recently in my quest for Catholic authors, to see what they did. Now what one did I pick up but not get to read yet...the one about the priest. Rats, can't remember the name.

I've been reading Flannery O'Connor's short stories. Once I read that her 'theme' was 'stalking pride' I have ben re-reading her stuff with all new appreiation. I read that she read and actually corresponded with Thomas Merton, another fav writer of mine, so I am hooked on her.

I also read a Danielle Steel novel. :p

And...this cool first start to a sci-fi novel....

jsorense
11-08-2002, 00:38:08
Lady,
SciFi can be really cool. What have you started?
I just picked up "Use of Weapons" by Iain M. Banks in a used paperback store.

Oh, yeah, Qweeg, you low down antiamerican dweezil.
Have a nice weekend.
:beer:

Lady_of_Chicken
11-08-2002, 00:41:20
Heh. I was referring to Qweeg's story. :)

jsorense
11-08-2002, 00:42:27
:)
:bounce:

Qweeg
11-08-2002, 17:29:33
Originally posted by jsorense
Lady,
SciFi can be really cool. What have you started?
I just picked up "Use of Weapons" by Iain M. Banks in a used paperback store.

Oh, yeah, Qweeg, you low down antiamerican dweezil.
Have a nice weekend.
:beer:

You have a nice weekend too you Ala-melican Peeg-Dogg! ;)
I am merely an example of what happens when you let socialists teach history to schoolkids.

Anyway American comedy-shows have de-Radicalized me again (since becoming dangerously Radicalized by reading Rogue State)
This is mainly becouse in the UK the comedy is so crap (and yet we're always banging on about how special and funny English humour is! :confused: yeah right, from thirty years ago maybe :rolleyes: )

So a few American atrocities are alright so long as you keep pumping over the good stuff (Friends, the Simpsons, Malcolm in the Middle etc).

Or Else...

Qweeg
11-08-2002, 17:34:42
Originally posted by Lady_of_Chicken
Heh. I was referring to Qweeg's story. :)

And for this I am immensly flattered, That'll get you everywhere! :)

Lady_of_Chicken
11-08-2002, 19:07:44
Originally posted by Qweeg



So a few American atrocities are alright so long as you keep pumping over the good stuff (Friends, the Simpsons, Malcolm in the Middle etc).

Or Else...

Friends and Malcom are some of the GOOD stuff??????

:hmm:


:D

Lady_of_Chicken
11-08-2002, 19:09:06
Originally posted by Qweeg


And for this I am immensly flattered, That'll get you everywhere! :)

Ha, so I can criticize your choice in American television viewing and escape retaliation? :)

Qweeg
12-08-2002, 12:32:32
At first I thought you were being ironic or something. I used to hate that Friends made me laugh- coz I thought they were all so smugly and pleased with themselves all the time, but it does, so what can I say... "I feel so cheap" maybe.

Dr Katz is good too, and Sienfeld and a bunch of other Paramount/Comedy Channel trash that I usually lap up when available even though they are all products of the yanqui oppressor.

Lady_of_Chicken
12-08-2002, 15:42:03
*falls on the floor choking and gasping!*

Seinfeld??????

*grin* You watch more American crap television than _I_ do and I'm American! :D

But then I am a nerd and don't watch TV as a pastime anywho. :p

All right, I'm hooked on the food channel and like to soak up all the good recipes. And I like the history, science and biography channels. And the animal channel. And SpongeBob, Johnny Bravo, Courage the Cowardly Dog and Animal Planet. And every Monday if I remember I watch the stand up comedy channel and see what's new out there...but I'm not committed to any one show.

RE: Friends. I must be out of the loop, Qaj will roar with laughter and I will be a bit concerned because it's gone completely over my head--could be the age gap--but I just can't relate. Their issues and concerns are not mine so I don't see what's so funny. In fact, I could get on a soapbox about the things that are supposed to be funny. Qaj says he can't relate either--as in he doesn't think or live the way the characters do, but he enjoys it for what it is. Me, I have to think too much about it.

Guy
12-08-2002, 15:45:13
Any and all respect I ever had for Qweeg just went out the window.

Friends? I mean, come on...

;)

MOBIUS
13-08-2002, 11:25:49
STILL reading Cryptonomicon!

Damn it's a long book!

Qweeg
13-08-2002, 13:42:28
-and Jonny Bravo and The Angry Beavers and Dexters Lab...

Look, about the Friends thing- I always crack up over that skinny black-haired womans character becous she's so fiercly competative and such a perfectionist, but don't ask me to justify my position on feeling generaly amused by most of the episodes I stop to watch. Who knows why, marvel at the mysteries of humour.

Now lets never speak of this again.

and Scrubs and Six Feet Under and Ren and Stimpy and- oh wait... I think thats about it.

Lady_of_Chicken
13-08-2002, 19:36:21
Scrubs is all right. It gets a little tedius when they only do sex related jokes, but when they start mixing it up again, it's great.

I like that tall doctor with the bugged eyes--the one that acts psycho. I find myself speaking that way to the kids sometimes...

MOBIUS
22-08-2002, 04:36:34
Yay! Finished Crypto a few days back! What an epic 918 small type pages!:eek:

Now on 'Antarctica', Kim Stanley Robinson's precursor book to the Mars Trilogy - only 400 odd pages this time, no problems!

jsorense
28-08-2002, 21:52:02
I am in the middle of "Use of Weapons" by I.M.Banks.
Although the book is good I haven't connected with any of the charaters yet. Like I said, I am in the middle and a lot more can, and will, happen.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
30-08-2002, 21:33:53
I haven't read a book in months :( *sigh*

Though I did borrow Greg Bear's Forge of God from the local library, mostly because it was the best book they had (!) and partly because I had a hankering to read it again. I hope I manage to get around to it...

mumin
30-08-2002, 23:37:22
American Gods by Neil Gaiman.

Heavy stuff. Odin vs. General Motors, like, and the writing's top notch as well.

Qweeg
31-08-2002, 14:46:35
Originally posted by Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
I haven't read a book in months :( *sigh*

Though I did borrow Greg Bear's Forge of God from the local library, mostly because it was the best book they had (!) and partly because I had a hankering to read it again. I hope I manage to get around to it...

Forge of God and Bloodmusic, the only two G Bear books I rate (as good stories).

Scabrous Birdseed
31-08-2002, 23:21:40
More Elisabeth George I'm afraid. This one is less good too.

King_Ghidra@home
01-09-2002, 10:16:46
put that shit down and pick up something decent.

I'm reading Austerlitz by W G Sebald and it is very very good.

Darkstar
01-09-2002, 10:26:10
Is Bloodmusic the book about smart germs?

Qweeg
02-09-2002, 13:08:54
Originally posted by Darkstar
Is Bloodmusic the book about smart germs?

Yup.

mumin
02-09-2002, 15:15:23
Lo and behold: American Gods wins this years Hugo. Told you so.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
03-09-2002, 16:06:51
Blood Music - One of the few fictional stories to attempt to discuss the possible effects of the Singularity. Cool book.

Anvil of Stars, while not as good as Forge is worth a read even if only to tie up the storyline.

Noisy
09-09-2002, 22:38:23
Finished 'Revelation Space', 'Chasm City' by Alastair Reynolds and 'The Inflationary Universe' by Alan C. Guth.

Now reading 'A is for Alibi' by Sue Grafton.

Qweeg
10-09-2002, 14:02:41
Finished '40.000 in Gehenna'. Brilliant, really good story- a very interesting concept of an alien intelligence, of how human societies can step back thousands of years in the space of generations. The story of the first 'Jin' is heartbreaking at times, becouse of the azi's innocence and trust- and dependance. Later on in the book though (when the aliens and children started to communicate) I felt kindof creeped out by the aliens, and wanted the humans to nuke the world into rubble.

And a good ending, I'm gonna havta get back into Cherryh's stuff- specially her 'Foreigner' series.

Also read Thief of Time, very good- typical Pratchett really, usuall insightful whit.

jsorense
10-09-2002, 14:30:13
Originally posted by Noisy
Now reading 'A is for Alibi' by Sue Grafton.

Noisy,
Did you know that sue Grafton lives in Santa Barbara? Santa Theresa (sp) is Santa Barbara with only some of the place names changed.

Venom
10-09-2002, 15:18:11
I bet other people live in Santa Barbara too.

King_Ghidra
10-09-2002, 15:36:05
hey! this forum's for the pople who read books, get outtahere!

Venom
10-09-2002, 15:40:25
I have photographic proof I was reading a book in New Zealand!

Scabrous Birdseed
10-09-2002, 16:35:02
I'm ashamed ladies and gentleman. I've followed the advice of mumin for the first time in my life, and bought American Gods. It's bloody great.

Venom
10-09-2002, 16:42:14
You're going to hell.

Venom
10-09-2002, 16:43:58
That has nothing to do with the book you just bought. I just happened to find that on the internet.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
10-09-2002, 18:06:21
Originally posted by jsorense
Lady,
SciFi can be really cool. What have you started?
I just picked up "Use of Weapons" by Iain M. Banks in a used paperback store.


A month later I get around to quoting this...

I've been trying to get my wife to read the Hyperion novels, but she refuses, even though they pique her interest.

Once I get my belongings sent from AUstralia (after two years of living here!) LoC certainly won't be lacking for choice of sci-fi to read :)

Noisy
10-09-2002, 19:03:23
I thought 'Hyperion' was excellent. Liked the follow-up. Bought the third title in the series ... but never got around to reading it. I'm mystified as to why I reacted in this way, given the amount of crap that I read. Why neglect to continue the series when I enjoyed the start so much? Consider the fact that I read all seven of the latest Donaldson series, when it started off with such an appalling opening.

Signed,
'Puzzled', of Trumpton-next-the-Sea

Noisy
10-09-2002, 19:05:27
Originally posted by Venom
I have photographic proof I was reading a book in New Zealand! First time I've seen 'Maxim' described as a book. :rolleyes:

Noisy
10-09-2002, 19:11:00
Originally posted by jsorense
Noisy,
Did you know that sue Grafton lives in Santa Barbara? Santa Theresa (sp) is Santa Barbara with only some of the place names changed. Yes, so the inside-front-cover blurb said.

If even half of the descriptions of the town and weather are correct, that is one amazing place to live! Of course, the downside is the number of murders ...

;)

Noisy
10-09-2002, 19:15:31
And that thread title still annoys me. :mad:

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
10-09-2002, 19:15:55
Actually, Noisy, it was a discussion of the third and fourth books in the series that increased m'Lady's probability of reading the series from 0% to 7% (her estimate) :)

Others to whom I have spoken volunteered the opinion that 3 and 4 weren't as good as the first two. I have to agree that 1 and 2 were the better books of the series, and that 3 and 4 do get kind of weird/New Agey towards the end. But I still think they're worth a read.

jsorense
10-09-2002, 20:07:03
I actually didn't like "Hyperion" much at all. I have no desire to read the next books in the series.

Noisy,
If you don't mind stepping over the bodies, Santa Barbara is wonderful.

moomin
10-09-2002, 20:38:08
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
I'm ashamed ladies and gentleman. I've followed the advice of mumin for the first time in my life, and bought American Gods. It's bloody great.

Let this be a lesson to you, my young apprentice. The moomin is sage. Following in a moomins footsteps is well-advised. Yada. Yada.

Seriously, I'm glad you liked it. Now you owe me a great book tip!

Noisy
10-09-2002, 22:05:20
Originally posted by moomin
<snip>

Seriously, I'm glad you liked it. Now you owe me a great book tip! :eek:

Noisy
10-09-2002, 22:09:08
Originally posted by jsorense
<snip>

Santa Barbara is wonderful. Alright, next time I go to New Zealand - and make no mistake, there will be a next time - you'll have to justify that. There just HAS to be a reason to go through the hell that is LAX.

Sean
10-09-2002, 22:21:49
About to start The Bridge, by Banks, as I have very recently finished reading On the Road, by Kerouac.

King_Ghidra
11-09-2002, 11:24:13
Did you like it?

When i read it at uni i thought it was brilliant. Hard to find a book with so much energy.

jsorense
11-09-2002, 16:03:30
Originally posted by Noisy
Alright, next time I go to New Zealand - and make no mistake, there will be a next time - you'll have to justify that. There just HAS to be a reason to go through the hell that is LAX.
Noisy, you are more than welcome here anytime. Did I ever tell you about the great wine country around here?
BTW, you can try San Francisco instead of LAX.
Currently not reading anything.

Sean
11-09-2002, 16:14:05
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Did you like it?

When i read it at uni i thought it was brilliant. Hard to find a book with so much energy.
Yeah, I did. It reminded me a bit of The Great Gatsby. The way the characters speak, all breathless enthusiasm, is really infectious, too.

Funkodrom
11-09-2002, 16:14:05
International flights don't go direct from the UK to San Francisco do they?

jsorense
11-09-2002, 20:29:20
Funkodrom,
Not being a travel agent I do not know the answer to that question.:rolleyes:
However, SFO is notorious for delayed and cancelled flights. It has only two major runways and they are too close together to allow simultaneous take offs and landings in bad weather. The weather is really shitty up there.

Sean
12-09-2002, 19:05:30
Just finished The Bridge, by Banks, moving onto The Glass Bead Game, by Hesse.

After reading The Bridge I can see why some of you enthuse over Banks so much—it’s far better than, say, Song of Stone.

King_Ghidra@home
12-09-2002, 19:30:02
you want to slow down mate, you're supposed to be reading for pleasure, not to win a race :)

Sean
12-09-2002, 19:37:07
I have been reading slowly, just steadily :). I’m not going to start on the next one until tomorrow, or maybe even the weekend.

jsorense
12-09-2002, 19:39:54
Glass Bead Game = Good
:)

Sean
12-09-2002, 19:42:34
Always good to get a recommendation before you read a book. I was cutting it mighty fine with this one, but thanks, j.

King_Ghidra@home
12-09-2002, 19:45:33
Is this the one?

"In 1931 Hesse began to work on his masterpiece DAS GLASPERLENSPIEL, which was published in 1943. The setting is in the future in the imaginary province of Castilia, an intellectual, elitist community, dedicated to mathematics and music. Knecht ('servant') is chosen by the Old Music Master as a suitable aspirant to the Order. He goes to the city of Waldzell to study, and there he catches the attention of the Magister Ludi, Thomas von der Trave (an allusion to Hesse's rival Thomas Mann). He is the Master of the Games, a system by which wisdom is communicated. Knecht dedicates himself to the Game, and on the death of Thomas, he is elected Magister Ludi."

quote from:
http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/hhesse.htm

moomin
12-09-2002, 20:11:16
I'm sure his greatful for the spoiler, KG.

And Song of Stone is by far the worst Banks' book I've ever read.

Sean
12-09-2002, 20:28:19
Cheers, KG! Trying to slow me down, eh?

moomin, I chose that because I thought everyone would agree with the comparison. It’s also better than the other non-M. books I’ve read: Complicity, Walking on Glass, and The Wasp Factory.

King_Ghidra@home
12-09-2002, 20:59:26
Originally posted by moomin
I'm sure his greatful for the spoiler, KG.



:p i left out the worst spoiler bits - although if you followed the link...

Funkodrom
13-09-2002, 09:14:36
Originally posted by Sean
Just finished The Bridge, by Banks, moving onto The Glass Bead Game, by Hesse.

After reading The Bridge I can see why some of you enthuse over Banks so much—it’s far better than, say, Song of Stone.

Yes. Song of Stone is a bit like an overlong short story. The Bridge was very good.

Complicity was quite a straight out thriller for Banks, I liked it but not his best. The Wasp Factory I really liked, it's so dark.

Generally his non-genre novels are a bit quirky. You're never sure what you're going to get.

King_Ghidra
13-09-2002, 09:46:37
cbeast! :shoot:

King_Ghidra
13-09-2002, 09:47:42
first ever one in the qweeg forum!! :D

*End Is Forever*
13-09-2002, 11:16:20
At the moment I'm reading this thread.

MOBIUS
06-05-2003, 23:02:34
I think this great thread needs to be resurrected!:)

I am currently reading 'No Logo' by Naomi Klein, which is an in depth and journalistic exploration of global branding...

Very good so far, though I'm only up to page 66

The book I read before was the excellent 'Stupid White Men' by Michael Moore, which is basically an expose of the men who run the US and ultimately much of the World - at turns hilarious, but your hysteria is tinged with a nervousness of a person who really would rather not find out all the myriad ways that the elite of the US are screwing their own country and the rest of the world in the pursuit of power and lining their pockets...:nervous:

The real scary thing is that although Moore is trying to shock and over dramatise, most of his sources are impeccable or at least highly respected...:eek:

Next up will be 'Fast Food Nation', hmmm could be a pattern developing here...:D

God I love libraries!:)

Debaser
06-05-2003, 23:08:08
Hey, I just read No Logo too (well, 2/3rds of it, I just didn't have the energy to read it to the end.)

I'm currently reading The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart. It's very good.

Sean
07-05-2003, 00:25:44
I’m reading ‘Footballers Don’t Cry: Selected Writings’ by Brian Glanville and a book about mazes.

King_Ghidra@home
07-05-2003, 07:34:55
Originally posted by Debaser
I'm currently reading The Dice Man by Luke Rhinehart. It's very good.

I really liked the first hundred pages or so of The Dice Man but it tailed off really badly. I think it was a real lost opportunity, a great idea but taken in the wrong direction.

I'm still ambling through War and Peace. Only a couple of hundred pages to go, but i've got the day off sick so let's see what happens...

Eklektikos
07-05-2003, 14:21:18
Currently reading the Koran, believe it or not. Usually on the tube on my way into work, getting off at Heathrow Airport with a suspicious looking bag... This may be evidence of a deathwish on my part.

MOBIUS
07-05-2003, 15:04:09
Originally posted by Debaser
Hey, I just read No Logo too (well, 2/3rds of it, I just didn't have the energy to read it to the end.)


Yeah, it is looking like a bit of a heavy read (p.91 now)...:nervous:

Rodgers
07-05-2003, 17:17:35
I'm reading Das Boot - good stuff but all the tension is spoilt by having seen the film already. Second dissappointment with this novel/film - I bought the film recently and realised too late that it was the dubbed version rather than the subtitled version I had seen and loved. Bugger.

King_Ghidra@home
07-05-2003, 17:21:53
dubbing is a terrible sin only acceptable in jackie chan movies

Sir Penguin
07-05-2003, 19:10:16
Currently reading The Ringworld Throne, by Larry Niven. It's really dull so far.

I read the four Harry Potter books over the weekend. They do get better as you move along; I was pleasently surprised. The movies for the first two are nothing compared to their prosaic counterparts.

Previous to that I read Endymion. I didn't think it was nearly as good as Hyperion or The Fall of Hyperion, but nevertheless an acceptable blend of the standard messiah story and the standard travel down the river on a raft story.

Before that I read The Dragon and the Fair Maid of Kent, by Gordon R. Dickson. It really sucked ass, but I enjoyed it. The editor did an absolutely horrible job: misspellings, mixed up character names, and so on. Dickson tends to repeat his back story until you're sick of it (at least he does in this series; maybe it's a thing with kids' books). I thought the bit with opium saving everybody from the plague was hilarious.

SP

King_Ghidra@home
07-05-2003, 19:41:47
Originally posted by Sir Penguin

I read the four Harry Potter books over the weekend. They do get better as you move along; I was pleasently surprised. The movies for the first two are nothing compared to their prosaic counterparts.

SP

i ordered these the other day. my sister has been telling me pretty much what you just said

Darkstar
07-05-2003, 21:25:09
I liked the Harry Potter series so far. Nice light fantasy stuff.

For a really good read, I heartily recommend 'Illegal Aliens' by Nick Pollotta & Phil Foglio. One of my all-time favorites. Its a comedy/SF Spoof starting out with first contact and works its way from there. Definately an all time favorite for me. Anyone that likes Spinal Tap should check this out, if they can even *STOMACH* Science Fiction. Because you'll love Illegal Aliens!

I recently read: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. If you like the Miles Vorkosigan series from Lois, you should probably check this out. Its in that story telling vein, only less manic. A good SF struggle novel for those not famaliar with Bujold's work. Moderate on the science, heavy on the characters and setting.

Also: The Spell of the Black Dagger [Book 6 of the Ethshar Series] by Lawrence Watt-Evans.
Black Dagger was ok. Not the worst in the series, but missing this in the series won't be counted as a crime either. It's a little scattered on character focus, and doesn't have that typical L W-E Ethshar of high fantasy (spectacularly beating the odds).

chagarra
08-05-2003, 04:47:49
With due regard to Queeg's earlier comment on Hamilton's 'Fallen Dragon'
.....BULLSHIT....

This must be THE worst book I have read in the last three years.

Having picked it up at the airport, and expecting a reasonably read on the trip. I think I spent more time looking out the window, until I could get out the laptop and reread something vaugely entertaining.
I have now had it a week, and have read a third, basically all in the throne room since it seems to help the process immensely.
This when my usual reading time for a book of this size is overnight.
I will try to persevere if only to see if there are any nubbins of readable matter further on, after all he DID write the trilogy didn't he.
This appears to have been writen by a committee, with at least five seperate threads of consciousness. At least three of which are flashback. One specifically for wetdreamers.

I will add more on completion, if I can stand the pain.

Rodgers
09-05-2003, 09:36:26
Anyone read any sci-fi by C J Cherryh? I always liked her stuff as it gave a pretty realistic view on the probable motives for space exploration and what life might be like for those who got involved in any possible colonisation of other worlds etc. She writes about labour disputes and suchlike - The Merchanter Universe stuff - ah well, if you havent then this makes it sound shit I suppose.

King_Ghidra
09-05-2003, 10:06:17
do a seach on this forum rodgers, i remember some other people talking about cherryh before

Funkodrom
09-05-2003, 10:11:25
Originally posted by King_Ghidra@home
i ordered these the other day. my sister has been telling me pretty much what you just said

Yeah. You'll get through them a bit quicker than War and Peace as well I imagine. :D

I prefered the Phillip Pullman Dark Materials trilogy more though, as recommended by FunkyFingers

Darkstar
09-05-2003, 20:59:35
Originally posted by Rodgers
Anyone read any sci-fi by C J Cherryh?

Yeah, a good bit of us here, Rodgers. Do a search, as directed, and bump the threads. I think there have been a few, but I'm getting to that point on a friday where I am thinking about being home for the weekend. ;)

Dyl Ulenspiegel
13-05-2003, 18:39:33
Recent readings:
Max Picard: Die Flucht vor Gott (what a load of crap)
Hardt/Negri: Empire (an even bigger load of crap, but somehow hilarious in its own way)
Dopsch ea: Geschichte Salzburgs I/1 and I/2 (about 1500 pages of our local history up to 1500 AD, and yes I found it interesting)

Waiting to borrow Stupid White Men from a friend.

Any other recommendations?

King_Ghidra@home
13-05-2003, 19:07:19
I am still crawling through War and Peace, only a couple of hundred pages to go.

I am about to order Foundation Pit by Andrei Platonov, i don't really know too much about other than it is a kind of 1984ish anti-utopian tale, and some very promising reviews of it, e.g.

Geoffrey Hosking, Times Literary Supplement, Dec. 6, 1996
Certainly among the half-dozen or so most important works of fiction of the entire Soviet period.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
13-05-2003, 19:17:37
I'd prefer historical fiction over science fiction at the moment.

Isn't War and Peace quite cumbersome to read?

King_Ghidra@home
13-05-2003, 19:37:40
mine is divided into two volumes, 700-odd pages each, fits nicely in my jacket pocket :)

it is both a magnificent novel and a magnificent account of russian and european social and political life circa 1812

not to mention some very stirring and horrifying accounts of the chaos of battle in that era

Sean
15-05-2003, 12:59:20
Originally posted by Sean
I’m reading ‘Footballers Don’t Cry: Selected Writings’ by Brian Glanville and a book about mazes.
The Years of the Goldfen Fix is one of the most depressing things about football I have read. Most of the stuff here is good, though.

jsorense
16-05-2003, 21:57:54
Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel" (1997/99)

chagarra
18-05-2003, 03:59:42
To continue my rant..... regarding ‘Fallen Dragon’

After much struggle and procrastination I finally made a valiant effort and finished it... Still don’t know why I bothered.

If you like a lot of apparently disconnected short stories hung around a rather threadbare storyline, where you are unsure whether you are reading the main current thread, or a flashback, with or without the obligatory gratuitous teenage sex scene. This may be just the book for you.
Don’t get me wrong, I’m not against all gratuitous sex scenes, just the ones that detract from the story.


If you can, picture all the scene change chapters in the trilogy, thrown into a hat, picked out in random order, and then squeezed into a single volume. Somewhere in there is the main storyline, but which it is, without a chronological order; the choice is always in doubt. Maybe the suspense of WTF is he up to, is the main idea.

Yes, as any good editor would see, there were some good short story vignettes, unfortunately they were not in the majority, and with the readers mind going in ever decreasing circles like a mad rat up a drainpipe, trying to figure where this ‘outstanding’, in context, piece of writing fits the overall picture.
They are likely to be missed.

I have finally come to the conclusion that this book was written before the trilogy, and used as a base for the developement of the latter. Including the fact that he still has no idea on how to finish a story.

My recommendation....... For what it’s worth.

Save your money. If you feel you must read it, visit a free library.

chagarra

Noisy
18-05-2003, 23:12:43
Originally posted by jsorense
Jared Diamond's "Guns, Germs, and Steel" (1997/99) Just bought that as well, though I fear it will be some time before it reaches the top of the 'to be read' pile (45 books in plain sight, a bunch in a pile at my parents', together with a whole stack of 'part series' waiting to be completed before even getting on the pile)!

chagarra: I think your review of 'Fallen Angel' is pretty harsh. It's an exciting story; great ideas; good writing. The fact that the ideas may have been better expressed in a series of shorter books that concentrated on individual ideas doesn't altogether negate the entertainment value.

Chairman Yang
18-05-2003, 23:35:09
"Om kriget" (Vom kriege, About the war) by Carl von Clausewitz. A bit like Sun tzu´s Art of War. Deals with warfare mostly dating back to the napoleonic wars.

chagarra
19-05-2003, 03:08:05
Noisy.....
Come on it was a simple money grab, like Jordan's newer stuff.

It might have been a readable book if it was followable. Basicaly he's tried to do too much, and buggered up the good parts.

Exiting, Great, Good....... Hmmmmm
not in my definition..... Average maybe at best.

Immortal Wombat
24-05-2003, 22:27:45
am reading: Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment

This will be my 4th attempt at completing it. I think I'm going to make it this time, I'm over half way. I'm getting really slow though, I can't seem to absorb the words of this like I usually do, I'm finding myself reading it to myself in my head.

Pretty good though.

Noisy
31-12-2003, 14:44:28
Just finished 'Guns, Germs and Steel' by Jared Diamond. It took me months, because although the ideas are engrossing, the repetitive presentation is turgid. I think the thesis (that 'Western' Empire-building success is not based on intelligence) is well developed and stands up, although I think I remember reading elsewhere that that there are some major critiscisms. Look at the Amazon.com (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0393317552/qid=1072880176/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_1/104-3598221-1207138) reviews for some radically divergent views. I do recommend it, but add the caveat that it is not for the faint-hearted.

Now reading 'Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid' by Douglas R. Hofstadter, which will probably take me just as long to wade through.

Venom
31-12-2003, 15:25:24
Turgid...:lol:

RedFred
31-12-2003, 20:57:31
Originally posted by Darkstar
...I recently read: Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold. If you like the Miles Vorkosigan series from Lois, you should probably check this out. Its in that story telling vein, only less manic. A good SF struggle novel for those not famaliar with Bujold's work. Moderate on the science, heavy on the characters and setting...


Yeah. I am liking Bujold to a surprising degree. I am trying to read that 'Volkswagen' series too but I am having trouble finding one of the books in the series.

If anyone out there likes historical fiction I can heartily recommend the latest trilogy by Neal Stephenson. It is good enough that I may do a review once I am done the first book. I don't think that the other two have been published yet.

Count me in amongst those who enjoyed Fallen Dragon. Although the ending was a bit cheesy.

Lady_of_Chicken
02-01-2004, 19:34:16
I NEED SOMETHING TO READ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Something fast-paced. Something medieval would be cool. Or speculative. Lots of action.

Something I can enjoy and not have to think about.

An experience. Entertainment.

Something above a magazine level but below something I have to think too much about and pour carefully over the prose and wade trough the author's soapbox thinly veiled as characters and plot, yet engaging.

A good story by a good storyteller.

Is that too much to ask for? :D

jsorense
02-01-2004, 19:56:18
Happy New Year Lady_of_Chicken.
Try "Timeline" by Michael Crichton. It reads like a screen play, I wonder why.

Lady_of_Chicken
02-01-2004, 20:26:42
Okay, I will.

Beggars can't be choosers. :)

Happy New Year!

Noisy
03-01-2004, 01:00:34
That's "pore ... over".

Ker-ching!

Happy New Year.

Lady_of_Chicken
03-01-2004, 01:18:29
Lol! I wondered about that, but I thought--ew, that can't be rite. *wink*

See, I need to read for fun--brayne is mush. :)

chagarra
03-01-2004, 10:36:32
If you can get hold of Eric Flint's Ring of Fire series, 1632 and 1633, it meets your criterion, they are well worth the read. Especially with the next one, 1634 The Galileo affair, about to be released soon.
I find it much easier, now that I have them in e-book format, to keep up with a lot of the new stuff.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
04-01-2004, 06:03:07
LoC ended up reading the comedy school diary I wrote when I was 15. She said she enjoyed it. I certainly enjoyed writing it!

SP: I wasn't aware there was a standard for books about "going down the river on a raft" except maybe Tom Sawyer.

DS: Illegal Aliens - is that anything like the movie Morons from Outer Space?

Noisy: I was recommended GEB: Eternal Golden Braid by a transhumanist who was talking about Bayesian cognitive science, and trying to write specs for superintelligent AI, so I borrowed it from the library. Three weeks wasn't long enough to be able to plough through the thing (well, not if you only read it during lunch breaks and are constantly interrupted) but it was fascinating nonetheless.

jsorense: LoC bought Timeline today, and is currently (like, right this second) engaged in reading it. I hope it's as good as you say, or I'll drive down to your place and demand our money back!

Noisy
04-01-2004, 15:06:55
Yep, having started it on Dec 26th, I don't anticipate a completion date this side of Feb. Each segment takes two or three read-throughs, even though the writing style is clear as a bell.

As a filler, I've started 'A Maze of Death' by Philip K. Dick as well.

Scabrous Birdseed
04-01-2004, 15:50:40
Well, the last five novels I've read have all been Ian Rankin detective books. They were generally okay, though wildly different in style. The last book I read was James Monaco's "How To Read a Film" which I found quite interesting, even though bits of it were outdated and pointless. I'm now able to use the phrase "mise en scéne" in everyday conversation, which is nice. :)

Currently reading... Coursework. Bummer. Once I'm done I think I'll tackle the last Rankin novel in the omnibus thingy or alternatively Peter Guralnick's Elvis biography.

jsorense
04-01-2004, 18:40:51
Originally posted by Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
jsorense: LoC bought Timeline today, and is currently (like, right this second) engaged in reading it. I hope it's as good as you say, or I'll drive down to your place and demand our money back! :nervous:
I did put a qualifier in there Qaj.:nervous:

Darkstar
05-01-2004, 21:14:04
Qaj... transhumanist? Was that... Anders, by any chance?

Illegal Aliens is a good, comedic, Sci-Fi that is light hearted and spoofs a lot of classic "Humans are always smarter then everyone else" space romps.

King_Ghidra
05-01-2004, 23:34:36
Currently ploughing through more Moorcock (i have to hide the books from my gf because she finds the name Moorcock too funny)

I far prefer the more buccaneering style of his work in the 60's to the treacle-paced stuff from the 80's. This is somewhat ironic as as i understand it, Moorcock originally created Elric as an attempt to fight the tolkien esque standing around talking type traditional fantasy writing of the time, and yet he himself ended up writing in this style.

After i finish this i start on robert e howard and conan

Qweeg
06-01-2004, 15:21:40
I liked Elric stuff as well, I always read it as a nice alternative take on the vampire angle, and all that chaos worship was refreshing change from doing the bidding of spindly poofs with big ears and over developed morals. Not a strange-attractor in sight though.

Scabrous Birdseed
06-01-2004, 16:01:39
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
After i finish this i start on robert e howard and conan

Yeah! I wish I still had them left to read, they're pure magic those short stories.

Fantasy Masterworks edition?

King_Ghidra
06-01-2004, 16:10:13
that's the bunny :)

i think there's two voumes, i have no 1

jsorense
08-01-2004, 21:05:04
Originally posted by Lady_of_Chicken
I NEED SOMETHING TO READ!!!!!!!!!!!!

Something fast-paced. Something medieval would be cool. Or speculative. Lots of action.

Something I can enjoy and not have to think about.

An experience. Entertainment.

A good story by a good storyteller.

Is that too much to ask for? :D Lady_of_Chicken, have you ever heard of the Brother Cadfael mysteries? There are a series of novels written by Ellis Peters about a 12th Century Benedictine monk who solves brutal crimes. Several to the stories were made into PBS's Mystery episodes.:)

Chairman Yang
09-01-2004, 08:25:11
Battle of Kursk and A bridge too far. ww2 rulez.

RedFred
09-01-2004, 20:00:03
I can give a solid two thumbs up to Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson. Not as funny as Snowcrash but what is?

Now I am part way through on book 2 of L.E. Modesitt Jr.'s Legacy series.

BigGameHunter
09-01-2004, 20:26:24
I am reading a historical bit titled "Mutiny on the Globe" about a crazed New Englander in the early 1800's who slaughters his captain and attempts to build a fascist Utopia in the pacific islands.
Started off agonizingly slow but is starting to pick up a bit.

Noisy
10-01-2004, 11:12:53
Now reading 'An Old Captivity' by Nevil Shute. Set in the 1930s, around a flying expedition to Greenland.

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
10-01-2004, 18:45:13
DS: Anders Sandburg? Nope. It was on a Singularitarian mailing list, and more of a general recommendation to list members.

Cumber
11-01-2004, 03:13:32
Currently reading Steven Brust's Jhereg serries (I think that's how it's spelt?). Right at this second in between Teckla and Taltos.

Darkstar
13-01-2004, 07:42:32
Qaj, yep, the one and only. :)

Cumber, I dimly remember the Jhereg. How many books are in that setting/series now?

Noisy
17-01-2004, 11:20:21
The Nevil Shute book was very good. Astounding view of how people saw the world before you could buy a ticket to virtually anywhere on the planet just by wandering to any number of travel agents in your local High Street.

Now reading 'Permutation City' by Greg Egan. First of his that I've read. This one explores artificial intelligence and virtual reality.

Lazarus and the Gimp
18-01-2004, 14:51:33
"Riddley Walker"

Noisy
19-01-2004, 12:31:31
I don't think I finished that, because I just couldn't get to grips with the way that the writing was presented, even though that was the whole point. Went to see the play at the Royal Exchange in Manchester.

Mr. Bas
19-01-2004, 16:56:01
I finished both 'The catcher in the rye' by J.D. Salinger and 'Vernon God Little' by DBC Pierre a couple of weeks ago, I liked both a lot. After that, I haven't read much, not any books at least. I have a copy of The brothers Karamazov lying around, but I haven't started yet... The size of it is a bit intimidating.

King_Ghidra
19-01-2004, 17:06:34
the prose is quite dense too. I'd suggest starting with the shorter dostoevsky stuff if you haven't read it already, e.g. crime and punishment.

Mr. Bas
19-01-2004, 17:25:13
I haven't read anything by Dostoyevsky so far. I might check if the library have something shorter by him...

Lazarus and the Gimp
19-01-2004, 20:36:51
Originally posted by Noisy
I don't think I finished that, because I just couldn't get to grips with the way that the writing was presented, even though that was the whole point. Went to see the play at the Royal Exchange in Manchester.

I'm sorry, but the thought of you attempting to read "Riddley Walker" has actually left me helplessly weeping with laughter. I can imagine the author receiving a list of spelling corrections running to 20,000 words.

Noisy
19-01-2004, 20:55:05
:D

jsorense
20-01-2004, 16:19:19
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far.

QtFLW@Work
20-01-2004, 22:41:33
Noisy: What did you think of Permutation City?

Noisy
21-01-2004, 00:45:06
Halfway through it, and yet I still feel as if I've yet to really get into it. It plays around with some areas that I'm getting interested in a bit more: consciousness and AI. I'm reading GEB (slowly), and I've just bought 'Consciousness Explained' by Daniel Dennett (but it may be a while until I get around to reading that).

BigGameHunter
21-01-2004, 06:01:21
Well, if you like PK Dick and are interested in consciousness, you must have read "A Scanner Darkly" by now, right?
I can imagine the first self aware AI's having issues along the lines of the protagonist's.
Or, better yet, the Valis trilogy (the have it under one cover these days). Talk about an exploration of messed up psyche.

Sean
22-01-2004, 16:08:59
Originally posted by jsorense
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far.
I read the first two of their prequels and think you pretty much hit the nail on the head: mildly interesting. If you’ve read either of those, how does it compare?

I’m reading The Hard-Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World.

alsieboo
22-01-2004, 20:02:34
just finished robert rankins 'hollow chocolate bunnies of the apocolypse' and just starting 'the witches of chiswick' by the same author

JM^3
22-01-2004, 21:16:01
Originally posted by Cumber
Currently reading Steven Brust's Jhereg serries (I think that's how it's spelt?). Right at this second in between Teckla and Taltos.

the best in this series is the phoneix guards

Jon Miller

Lazarus and the Gimp
22-01-2004, 22:16:09
Finished "The Clerkenwell Tales" by Peter Ackroyd, and now starting "Riddley Walker" in earnest. It's very good.

jsorense
24-01-2004, 08:26:56
Originally posted by jsorense
Dune: The Butlerian Jihad by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson.
There are some mildly interesting bits in it so far. Well I finally finished it. All and all, don't bother.
I thought the whole treatment of the "thinking machines' was totally off base.
The writhing was "hoo huum" but that isn't too surprising because most of Frank Herbert's writing was hoo huum too.

Scabrous Birdseed
24-01-2004, 09:24:19
The Cambridge Companion to Crime Fiction. I'm... not entirely... sure exactly... why.

Lazarus and the Gimp
24-01-2004, 15:09:54
The only crime fiction I've seriously read is Derek Raymonde. There was some unpleasant stuff in that man's head.

jsorense
27-01-2004, 16:02:47
I ust started The Peacewar by Vernor Vinge (1984). I am on page 63 and enjoying it a lot so far.

Nills Lagerbaak
27-01-2004, 17:34:12
Just finished the alchemist.

SOme interesting things in there. Very simply written, could be a fairy tale or something, but quite poignent

QtFLW@Work
27-01-2004, 18:58:14
Originally posted by jsorense
I ust started The Peacewar by Vernor Vinge (1984). I am on page 63 and enjoying it a lot so far.

I read that and the sequel a few weeks back. Good book(s). Though the end of "Marooned in Realtime" was a tad confusing at first read.

Qweeg
28-01-2004, 11:45:15
I read that book, I really enjoyed the first story, and although I liked the concepts and ideas shown in the second story, I was really disappointed that Vinge seemed to abandon everything he'd built up for reader to care about from the first story (the characters, their world, what happened next etc).

QtFLW@Work
28-01-2004, 16:32:10
Warning jsorense, warning! Spoilers ahoy!



The books were some of a few that addresses Vinge's concept of singularity, a point in time where technology advances to the point where if it was plotted on a graph, it would suddenly go straight up - a spike, of sorts, beyond which you can't even begin to imagine what society would be like.

The Peace War deliberately slowed the pace of technological advance from real-world levels (some estimates put a real-world Singularity as soon as 2020, as late as 2080 or beyond for really conservative estimates) so Vinge could tell a cool story :) without having to squash it all into a few decades (his perception of 'time until the Singularity' from the date the book was written).

Marooned... was supposed to have been a drastic break from the previous book, as it was trying to capture a possible outcome of a sudden Singularity on human society. The first book was pretty much just elaborate setup for the second book, trying to show what happened when the human race 'transcended' their humanity.


Vinge's Fire Upon the Deep was another tale that setup somewhat elaborate obstacles to a Singularity to tell a specific story.

jsorense
28-01-2004, 20:50:36
Thanks for the comments guys.:)

I just finished and it was pretty good. However, it got to be a little too Ender's Game at the end for me. A book I think is way over rated IMHO.

Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.

Hmmm, I just noticed that Card published Ender's Game a year after The Peacewar. Oh, and they are making a movie of E'sG now.

Mr. Bas
29-01-2004, 14:16:09
I still haven't had the courage to pick up Dosteyevski, so I started on I Jan Cremer instead. It's a pretty enjoyable book IMO.

Sean
30-01-2004, 21:42:05
The Professor and the Madman.

jsorense
31-01-2004, 19:58:37
The Korean War: The West Confronts Communism by Michael Hickey.
This is written by a Brit so that Commonwealth troops are highlighted. He is also happy to point out any U.S. shortcomings.
Refreshing.:)

Noisy
01-02-2004, 12:12:53
Well, I've finished 'Permutation City' now. I must admit that I read it in rather a fragmentary fashion, and didn't pick up on the time jumping about in the first half of the book (because I hardly ever bother reading chapter titles), but I'm still not that impressed. It doesn't pass the test of whether I'd pass it on to my father to read, I'm afraid. I think it deals with pretty big concepts, but the answers are simplistic. I wouldn't tell people not to read it, but then again I wouldn't recommend it.

Sean
01-02-2004, 12:15:48
Originally posted by Sean
The Professor and the Madman.
Subtitled A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary. Great read: I love Simon Winchester’s history books.

Noisy
07-02-2004, 00:37:14
Now reading 'A Devil's Chaplain' by Richard Dawkins.

Vincent
07-02-2004, 07:50:52
http://www.krimi-couch.de/images/books/S/georges-simenon-der-grosse-bob.jpg

Scabrous Birdseed
07-02-2004, 09:33:05
I've grown a bit bored of The Cambridge Companion, currently reading Dance of Life: Popular Music and Politics in Southeast Asia by Craig A. Lockard.

Scabrous Birdseed
07-02-2004, 20:03:58
I'm currently reading a text file containing a scene-for-scene description of the storyline of all the Resident Evil games.

Darkstar
07-02-2004, 20:05:13
Scabby, that sounds like a serious cry for help! Should we dispatch the Betan Emergency Psych teams?

Scabrous Birdseed
07-02-2004, 20:12:01
It's fascinating meta-literature in a way. You keep wanting to find out what happens next, yet there's no actual narrative in there. It's like a hyper-compressed suite of novels.

Lazarus and the Gimp
07-02-2004, 20:39:08
"St Dunstan- his life, times and cult" by Prof. Lapidge.

BigGameHunter
08-02-2004, 00:46:41
"House of Sand and Fog" by Andre Dubus III. Pretty good.

QtFLW@Work
10-02-2004, 17:43:42
Originally posted by jsorense
Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.

The fact that I moved to California and then reread the book knowing the geography it was set it enhanced my appreciation of the book when I read it a few weeks back.

King_Ghidra
10-02-2004, 17:56:09
Originally posted by BigGameHunter
"House of Sand and Fog" by Andre Dubus III. Pretty good.

So what happened to Andre Dubus I and II? I think we should be told.

BigGameHunter
10-02-2004, 22:52:25
They probably never existed. What nom de plume would be good as a "I" or a "II"?

Noisy
15-02-2004, 09:45:56
Now reading 'Dead Air' by Iain Banks.

Qweeg
17-02-2004, 11:47:24
Originally posted by jsorense
Thanks for the comments guys.:)

I just finished and it was pretty good. However, it got to be a little too Ender's Game at the end for me. A book I think is way over rated IMHO.

Oh, I liked the setting, almost like having take place in my backyard.

Hmmm, I just noticed that Card published Ender's Game a year after The Peacewar. Oh, and they are making a movie of E'sG now.

Really... a movie of Enders Game you say?

Noisy
17-02-2004, 12:56:02
Now reading 'The Last Three Minutes' by Paul Davies.

BigGameHunter
19-02-2004, 16:31:41
Also revisiting "The Handmaid's Tale" by Margaret Atwood as preparation for why I'll vote Democrat this November.

zmama
19-02-2004, 16:56:07
My daughters and I thank you.

Venom
19-02-2004, 18:29:22
For reading, or being a deluded liberal ass puppet?

zmama
19-02-2004, 18:48:09
Yes

BigGameHunter
20-02-2004, 10:51:28
Don't worry, if it all goes sideways on us, I'll be sure to "get religion" so you can be my handmaids.
At least I'll let you smoke and drink in secret (provided you aren't carrying my children, that is).

RedFred
20-02-2004, 23:17:34
Back when Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale came out twenty years ago, I tried reading it but I couldn't complete it. Too much left wing Anti-Americanness and general looneyness for me.

But I recently saw the movie. I hate to say it, but now in the current GWB Jr. era, the tale suddenly comes across as chilling and effective. I might have to give the book another shot.

BigGameHunter
21-02-2004, 19:27:13
It's pretty well done and doesn't seem at all totally unlikely. You'd have a major uprising, but unfortunately, it's now within the realm of remote possibility.

RedFred
21-02-2004, 19:58:05
I'll check the library for it.

It the meantime I am reading Forward's Saturn Rukh. Serves me right for whining about soft, unoriginal SF in the other thread. This guy has some interesting and somewhat plausible ideas, but he kind of falls down on the storytelling side of things. Still, not a bad read so far.

Noisy
21-02-2004, 23:01:46
Now reading 'The Remains of the Day' by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Went to see the play of 'The Handmaid's Tale' last year. Bit of a minimalist production that I didn't think much of.

BigGameHunter
23-02-2004, 11:08:26
You ended your sentence with a preposition. You must still be in shock!

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-02-2004, 17:51:44
Re-reading "Into thin air" by Jon Krakauer.

Noisy
27-02-2004, 19:09:11
Wot's a preposition? :p

Now reading 'Just Six Number' by Martin Rees, about the fundamental constants of the Universe.

I enjoyed 'The Remains of the Day'. Took me a while to get over the fact that it was written by a bloke with oriental appearance and name. By the end I'd forgotten about that and was absorbed in the story. I'll look out for the film on DVD now, so that I can make the comparison.

alsieboo
02-03-2004, 10:16:02
I've just finished reading "They came and ate us - Armageddon II: The B-movie" by Robert Rankin and I'm currently enjoying 'Windfall' Penny Vincenzi and also 'An ordinary lunacy' Jessica Anderson. The latest two are revolving around high flying yong men and their lovers in some way, one more dated than the other, but both high class society trash. Needless to say I'm enjoying it :p

BigGameHunter
02-03-2004, 16:13:30
OK...just finished "House of Sound and Fog" (no, I don't have a reading disability, I have kids!!!).
I need a great book with short chapters that I can read in the bath.

zmama
02-03-2004, 16:31:41
Fiction or non? ...not that I have anything in mind right now :lol:

QtFLW@Work
02-03-2004, 16:37:10
Originally posted by BigGameHunter
OK...just finished "House of Sound and Fog" (no, I don't have a reading disability, I have kids!!!).
I need a great book with short chapters that I can read in the bath.

So something with plastic pages them? I think my youngest kids have something that'd qualify.

Noisy
13-03-2004, 13:07:35
Just finished 'Night Watch' by Terry Pratchett. Engaging and well written.

Noisy
15-03-2004, 15:23:37
Now reading 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' by Lynn Truss. This book is right up my street, being dedicated to a discussion of spelling issues that are meat and drink to a spelling nazi like me!

BigGameHunter
15-03-2004, 21:56:05
Just started "Chindi" by Jack McDevitt (sp?). A good, brisk second contact type sci fi book. I'm liking his style a lot.

alsieboo
16-03-2004, 01:23:27
right, finished the big fat trashy romance, can't find other book, so I'm now reading 'American psyco' Hm.

King_Ghidra
16-03-2004, 09:56:51
Originally posted by Noisy
Now reading 'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' by Lynn Truss. This book is right up my street, being dedicated to a discussion of spelling issues that are meat and drink to a spelling nazi like me!

Got this the other day, but haven't started on it yet.

Now into the second Conan compilation. Looks better than the first so far, but that was good fun so i have high hopes.

Originally posted by Alsieboo

so I'm now reading 'American psyco' Hm.

great book. Although i leant it to my sister when she was about 16/17 and i think she found some of it a bit much.

I'll say Rat. And i'll say no more.

BigGameHunter
17-03-2004, 19:29:07
I'm ramping up now, baby!
Now reading "Chindi" (good) Siddhartha (re-reading) and picked up "Into the Wild" (forget the author but he's a really good travel/outdoor writer type)--a true story about a disaffected rich kid who goes into the woods in a Kerouacian/Tolstoyian fugue and dies of starvation.

Rodgers
18-03-2004, 12:11:12
Just finished Albert Speers autobiog. Now reading "The Fall of Crete" by Alan Clark (of The Diaries fame).

Chris
18-03-2004, 19:22:00
On a WWII kick Rodgers?

Scabrous Birdseed
18-03-2004, 20:09:06
Martin Heidegger, "Origin of Works of Art". Unfortunately.

jsorense
19-03-2004, 16:02:28
I finally finished Alastair Reynolds' Chasm City. I thought it was overlong, boring and the three plot lines were never integrated properly. I forced myself to finish it becuz I'm a cheap SoB and didn't want to waste (HA!) my money.

[waiting for Qweeg to explode]

QtFLW@Work
19-03-2004, 20:28:12
Isn't it already wasted because you spent it on a crap book? :D

Noisy
20-03-2004, 10:59:03
Now reading 'The Lion's Game' by Nelson DeMille. Apparently I should have read 'Plum Island' first.

'Eats, Shoots and Leaves' is an excellent book, however ... I really can't forgive that Nevil Shute was spelled incorrectly (in two different ways) on the cover and in the body of the book: are these folk illiterate?

Noisy
20-03-2004, 11:01:25
Oh, and Mr Ense ... 'Chasm City' is a fine book: how you could think it boring, I just don't know.

I can try and do something about the exploding of Qweeg this afternoon ... if he remembers to turn up.

Qweeg
20-03-2004, 11:59:06
Don't worry, I'm not going to explo>BANG!<

RedFred
20-03-2004, 21:48:56
Finally found the first of Modesitt's Recluse series. I think Chagarra recommended it. Great read.

I am part way through Bujold's Diplomatic Immunity now. That Vorkosigan series is great, but I had to skip one that I couldn't find.

Rodgers
22-03-2004, 11:14:37
Originally posted by Chris
On a WWII kick Rodgers?

Yup, lately at least. Now reading "Ill Met By Moonlight" - the book they based the film on - about resistance in Crete during WWII.

JM^3
28-03-2004, 01:50:44
I just read all of the black company series by glen cook

it was decent

Jon Miller

alsieboo
28-03-2004, 02:07:57
Blood hunt - Ian Rankin as Jack Harvey. I've left AP for a while.

Lady_of_Chicken
28-03-2004, 03:29:29
So many books, so little time. :(

JM^3
28-03-2004, 04:00:15
yah

during my spring break I read like 13 novels or something like that

and it's not even over yet

Jon Miller

Noisy
28-03-2004, 09:53:59
Now reading 'Dr. Bloodmoney' by Phillip K. Dick.

BigGameHunter
29-03-2004, 21:00:05
Ooooh...my favorite author (well, in the top five or so anyhow). Have you struggled through the VALIS trilogy yet? A pretty good glimpse of what the world must be like to someone who has had a major (or minor?) psychotic "break".

alsieboo
01-04-2004, 21:11:32
Dreamcatcher - Stephen King

Noisy
06-04-2004, 10:33:48
Now reading 'Project Orion' by George Dyson. During the 1950s and 1960s there were research efforts into spaceflight using atomic bombs as the propulsion mechanism. This story is told by the son of Freeman Dyson; Freeman being one of the people involved in the project.

Immortal Wombat
06-04-2004, 17:10:34
Back to the office, so I've started the suitably long Count of Monte Cristo to see me through the next three months of lunch hours.

BigGameHunter
07-04-2004, 04:38:06
Well, fuck you too, Noisy!

Noisy
07-04-2004, 10:39:19
Sorry, BGH. Not an intentional snub. Just that my focus flits around at the moment.

I find that PKD is a bit hard to take, but I read his stuff for the ideas. He tends to stray towards fantasy a bit too much for my taste. Haven't read the Valis trilogy, but then I think it's the different world view that he has that puts me off sometimes.

BigGameHunter
08-04-2004, 07:28:34
;)
VALIS is indeed a very difficult read. If you familiarize yourself with his mental state at the time, it's painful to see what must have been going on in his mind.

For my money "The Man in the High Castle" is his most accessible novel, but I really enjoyed "A Scanner Darkly" as well.

BTW, reading Le Guin's "Left Hand of Darkness" again. Amazingly good book with an extremely plausible and original gender neutrality theme.

Qweeg
08-04-2004, 10:08:50
Top book that BGH, she crafts a good world. Still lookin to track down more of her Hain universe stuff.

BigGameHunter
08-04-2004, 14:50:05
Wasn't aware she did more in that vein...though I love that book, she's not one of my favorite reads...haven't really given her the chance she deserves, which is shameful, as she is one of this city's residents.
Everyone should give "Noir" a shot-- author's last name is Jeter and he picked up on some of Dick's storylines with approval.

Qweeg
08-04-2004, 14:58:56
She's said that her book 'The Lathe of Heaven' was based in Seattle (is it?) where she lives. That's also a top read.

RedFred
08-04-2004, 18:39:56
Lathe of Heaven was a pretty good movie too. They sure didn't spend much money on SFX but if you liked the book it is worth a viewing.

Noisy, if you are a fan of Dyson, both son and father, I recommend the nonfiction semi-biographal A Starship and a Canoe

BigGameHunter
09-04-2004, 15:27:54
Qweeg~ I live in Portland and last time I noticed she did as well...she's getting pretty old though...might not live here much longer!
And FYI, mistaking Portland for Seattle is sacrilege here.
It's like asking someone if she's a kid's grandma when she's really the mother you fucker!

jsorense
09-04-2004, 16:58:10
I have just started P.D.James' "The Murder Room."
I've read most of her Dagliesh mysteries and have liked all of them.