PDA

View Full Version : Special Measures!


Beta1
01-09-2010, 17:46:24
Yaaay my school is failing - its going to be special measures for us when ofsted turn up at the end of the month!

All because one department totally buggered things up. (not mine)

Yaaay!!!

MDA
01-09-2010, 17:52:34
Is there a possibility you'll have to suffer for their failure? yaay

Beta1
01-09-2010, 18:08:34
not a possibility - a certainty!!!!

In the UK at the moment the only figure that seems to count is the % of students reacing 5 A*-C including maths and english.

Maths hit their target, science (me) didnt get ours but all the maths A-C kids also got science so thats OKish. English missed should have been same as maths but instead got low thirties.....

So the whole school will be judged failing for that one statistic.

(Yaay)

Apocolypse
01-09-2010, 19:07:07
Your school is doomed.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
01-09-2010, 19:52:06
How "special" are those measures?

lightblue
01-09-2010, 22:26:21
My former school went into special measures, but that was because it was shit overall. Special measures basically means that the local authority will send some advisers to help turn things around. It might mean a new executive head and other leadership reorganisation. As a teacher it means having everything you do scrutinised and having the inspectors in every few months till things are sorted.

Suffice to say that I, and most other teachers that could (ie weren't shit), left the school to greener pastures. It is nice to now be in a school were even 1 kid not getting 5 a*-C in your class is seen as a failure.

Cheshire Cat
02-09-2010, 08:33:28
so, the only thing that will change for Beta is that he'll have to learn to be the inspectors' suckup

MDA
02-09-2010, 11:36:05
As a teacher it means having everything you do scrutinised


Grad school working conditions! :lol:

Greg W
02-09-2010, 15:01:03
Alright. WTF is does "5 a*-C" mean? :confused:

Funko
02-09-2010, 15:32:14
a* is a grade, higher than an A

So it's five GCSE qualifications grades between grade C and grade A*.

C is typically viewed as the pass grade for GCSE.

Greg W
02-09-2010, 15:48:58
Ah, I see. How many grades below "C"? And why make a grade above "A"? Why not just shift everything down one? Ala...
a* -> A
A -> B
B -> C
etc...

Cheshire Cat
02-09-2010, 15:54:10
a* is a grade, higher than an A

So it's five GCSE qualifications grades between grade C and grade A*.

C is typically viewed as the pass grade for GCSE.

it still bugs me:

why say "between" C and the top grade???

that's illogical and anti-economical, as there is no grade anyway outside the high end of the "between" range

C or higher would be much more clear
even shorter, you need "5 pass"
as easy as 1-2-3, or shoud we say A-B-C...

whatever

I go home now

Funko
02-09-2010, 15:58:51
I don't know how the terminology came into being, but it's what everyone says now. I agree that "C or above" would be simpler.

Funko
02-09-2010, 15:59:16
Ah, I see. How many grades below "C"? And why make a grade above "A"? Why not just shift everything down one? Ala...
a* -> A
A -> B
B -> C
etc...

You mean why not just make 10 a bit louder?

These go up to A*!

Funko
02-09-2010, 16:00:22
I believe the percentage scores you need to get each grade stayed the same, but A* requires a higher percentage than A. Something like that. An A is the same as an A always was, but an A* is a better A. So you can compare people between years before they had A*s.

Greg W
02-09-2010, 16:21:55
Well, why not just have:
A+
A
A-
B+
B
B-
etc...

Aka why does A and only A deserve a special grade? Sorry, just seems very arbitrary and weird to me. Here we have percentage grades. Though I do believe that the bell curve is completely out the window on the percentages, but that's another story.

MDA
02-09-2010, 16:59:25
I think we just about any system of grading you can imagine in the US, depending on the school (or school level).

Some schools even give "E"'s instead of "F"'s to failing students, because telling them they've failed hurts their wittle feewings. No one ever failed and tried harder the next time, right?

lightblue
02-09-2010, 17:26:10
At GCSE typically 90%+ = A*, 80%+ A etc. God knows why they don't just use percentages as marks, it would be far more precise, and they give us all the data anyway. The new (well 2-3 years) headline statistic is >5 A*-C including Maths and English, although at my school it is >5 A*/A inc Maths and English. All depends on the school and its ambitions/background.

Beta1
02-09-2010, 19:27:09
Current ofsted inspection criteria make the 5 A*-C inc maths and english a limiting factor - it doesn't matter how good any other department or grade is - fail that one and the whole school fails.

My dept is pretty good, not perfect by any means, but we got twice the pass rate that English got.

lightblues suggestion of abandoning grades and reporting either raw grades (or my personal pref percentiles) is the only way education in this country is going to get out of the constant grade inflation v improving education arguement.

The current inspection system and exam system is broken almost beyond repair. Most schools are actually pretty good but thats despite of rather than because of ofsted/dept of education...

Fistandantilus
02-09-2010, 19:50:57
a* is a grade, higher than an A

So it's five GCSE qualifications grades between grade C and grade A*.

C is typically viewed as the pass grade for GCSE.

So A is not "Acceptable"? E is not "Exceeds Expectations"? :confused:

Koshko
03-09-2010, 00:30:51
I think we just about any system of grading you can imagine in the US, depending on the school (or school level).

Some schools even give "E"'s instead of "F"'s to failing students, because telling them they've failed hurts their wittle feewings. No one ever failed and tried harder the next time, right?


Well it does make some sense to not skip a letter.

Koshko
03-09-2010, 00:32:38
Also around here it's possible to get above a 4.0 on a 4.0 scale. Apparently you can get super As or something.

Cheshire Cat
03-09-2010, 07:46:55
well, it's the same as with academic or doctorate honors, when reaching the top is not enough a distincion and you want to point out the top of the top

(C+, i.e. top of the average, makes much less sense imho...)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_honors

cum laude, meaning "with honor" ("avec distinction" in French, "met onderscheiding" in Dutch)
magna cum laude, meaning "with great honor" ("avec grande distinction" or "met grote onderscheiding")
summa cum laude, meaning "with highest honor" ("avec la plus grande distinction" or "met de grootste onderscheiding")

French add the Jury Praise (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tr%C3%A8s_honorable_avec_f%C3%A9licitations) for la crème de la crème

I heard the highest level of praise was conferred with an "academic kiss" literally bestowed upon the new doctor by the jury president

Funko
03-09-2010, 07:58:36
Would be like the French to introduce kissing into it.

Greg W
03-09-2010, 14:10:20
summa cum laude, meaning "with highest honor" ("avec la plus grande distinction" or "met de grootste onderscheiding")Yes, I have known summa girls like that! :nervous:

MOBIUS
03-09-2010, 14:33:29
Did you make them cum laude-ly?

Greg W
03-09-2010, 14:41:25
Thanks for the PHd. :p

MOBIUS
03-09-2010, 14:45:48
I couldn't resist that one!:D

Provost Harrison
04-09-2010, 12:38:40
Ah, I see. How many grades below "C"? And why make a grade above "A"? Why not just shift everything down one? Ala...
a* -> A
A -> B
B -> C
etc...

Close, probably nowadays

A* -> E
A -> F
B and everything below -> Shit

Koshko
05-09-2010, 03:47:07
Hey now. Not all education systems are as horrible as the US's.

Provost Harrison
05-09-2010, 10:38:32
Perhaps the education system has got better, after all, I managed to get into Oxford, somehow, some way :D

Greg W
06-09-2010, 03:07:33
Or Oxford just lowered their standards.

A lot. :p

Funko
06-09-2010, 07:50:20
He used the Park'n'Ride.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
06-09-2010, 15:14:17
cunning

Koshko
06-09-2010, 17:09:48
Our kids in the early grade are comparable to others. It's the older grades where we drop off into massive stupidity.

MOBIUS
07-09-2010, 11:20:11
He used the Park'n'Ride.

They actually have quite a good Park'n'Ride in Oxford, unlike Cardiff's when you have to virtually drive into town to get to them...

Funko
07-09-2010, 12:13:12
Yes, I know, hence the brilliance of my post.

MDA
07-09-2010, 12:29:26
brilliantly brilliant

MOBIUS
07-09-2010, 13:44:14
It was so brilliantly brilliant, I agreed with you.