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View Full Version : Epic fail


Asher
04-02-2010, 20:29:39
I am currently on EMAIL NUMBER TWENTY and DAY FIVE of my attempt to get the IT folks in Quebec to remove a corporate firewall restriction preventing me from accessing the website of a video service provider THAT OUR COMPANY IS WORKING WITH.

I had 3 weeks to develop 3 different programs (uploader, management tool, video player) for a video site we are launching at work. We signed a six-figure contract with a major video service provider & CDN.

1 week after development started, I STILL CANNOT ACCESS THEIR WEBSITE OR SERVICES. This is unreal. The deadline has not changed.

How am I supposed to do anything? How fucking hard is it to whitelist a site?

They've told me "it's fixed now" AT LEAST five times, it NEVER has been...they don't even bother checking.

Fucking french people, jesus fucking christ.

Oerdin
04-02-2010, 21:31:51
Obviously they won't do it so go to your boss and explain to him what these asshats are doing or not doing and how their incompetence is impacting your project.

Asher
05-02-2010, 00:38:22
My boss is in Denver and my boss has no other boss.

I'm just reaming people out via email.

Cheshire Cat
05-02-2010, 08:24:10
..

Cheshire Cat
05-02-2010, 08:24:53
don't go but just email your boss, with the IT and their boss in cc:
report him with due advance what's preventing to meet your project deadline

Such obstacle either:

- does not fall under your authority and responsibility: then the failure won't be your fault

- falls under your authority and responsibility, as you have to answer "end-to-end" and despite being an internal function the IT is "transparent" to your project sponsor:
then you're at the same time responsible and authorised to take whatever action to get around or "thru" the obstacle. Whatever the problem, you should and must find just any working solution.
Find a way to access the VSP site some other way, or get your boss authorize you to override the company security policies and hack yourself your way inside the firewall (make sure to keep cc: the company security officer too)
:)

MDA
05-02-2010, 12:05:18
negotiate with NUCLEAR WEAPONS!

Asher
05-02-2010, 17:30:43
It gets better.

They gave up on unblocking the site from the firewall (I guess it is too hard). Their new approach is to give me unfettered access to all of the interwebs.

First question they ask me: What is my computer name? I tell them what it is, but that it doesn't matter as I'm not on the corporate domain they administer. I tell them all they need is my MAC address to add me to the exemption list (this has been done before). I provide my MAC address.

Then they ask me what the model of my laptop is. I am utterly confused. I tell them what it is, but that it doesn't matter as it's not a laptop they provisioned. I tell them all they need is my MAC address to add me to the exemption list (this has been done before). I provide my MAC address.

Then they kindly notify me that they only support PCs, not Macintosh computers.

...

So I ask if they can escalate this a step farther or communicate with a different representative. No response for 2+ hours now.

Asher
05-02-2010, 17:33:06
don't go but just email your boss, with the IT and their boss in cc:
report him with due advance what's preventing to meet your project deadline

The head of IT has been CCed on the email chain from the start. The CTO is on the email chain. The project manager is on the email chain. It is absurd how many people are on this chain but no one is doing a fucking thing. I don't think most of them are even reading it.

I've also clearly spelled out to them on two occasions that this is an urgent request and it is holding up time-critical development. I first told them this a week ago.

Such obstacle either:

- does not fall under your authority and responsibility: then the failure won't be your fault

- falls under your authority and responsibility, as you have to answer "end-to-end" and despite being an internal function the IT is "transparent" to your project sponsor:
then you're at the same time responsible and authorised to take whatever action to get around or "thru" the obstacle. Whatever the problem, you should and must find just any working solution.
I've found a working solution for my own uses, but I have not told them this for a couple reasons:
1) It'd provide incentive for them to continue taking their time
2) What I'm doing now is explicitly against corporate guidelines (I'm using an external proxy to bypass their network altogether)

mr_B
05-02-2010, 17:41:22
was was

Asher
05-02-2010, 20:10:29
Their solution to appease me was to turn off the corporate firewall for the entire 2500+ person company. They've asked me not to tell anyone, because the rush to YouTube would crush our capacity.

Jesus fucking christ.

Beta1
05-02-2010, 20:18:28
They are up there with my IT department who can't update their webpage remotely to tell people the school is closed....

I Am Not Jon Miller
05-02-2010, 20:32:12
My team got in trouble for testing open-source software on a standalone unclassified computer - the IT people said it was a security risk.

I Am Not Jon Miller
05-02-2010, 20:42:47
And standard practice for us was to tunnel out to milw0rm or whatever through a co-worker's home server.

"Can you give us access to milw0rm? We need it to do our jobs." "Nope."
"How about now? Here's a letter from the branch chief." "Nope."
"How about now? Here's a letter from the director." "Nope.
Time passes. "Hey why do you guys have so much SSH traffic?" "It is a mystery."

Asher
05-02-2010, 20:56:08
Yes, I very frequently do this. Even when I use the proxy to get around the firewall, they frequently block ports.

We actually have a server up on the Amazon cloud that is our dedicated SSH tunnel box. I've got a dynamic tunnel set up to do everything.

I Am Not Jon Miller
05-02-2010, 21:09:02
We were in the fantastic position of having IT services contracted out, so it didn't matter if the director (who had about two or three thousand people under him, so this wasn't just some random schmuck) said that we needed access to milw0rm, because the director couldn't fire the IT people. Instead when the IT contract was up at the end of the year there would be so many complaints that the powers that be would contract out to a different company, so all of the IT workers would quit the old company and get hired by the new company (because they'd already have all of the necessary clearances which would otherwise take three to nine months to get). Our IT was contracted out to three different companies during my 5-year tenure, and I'd estimate that there was a 10-20% turnaround in IT workers.