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protein
24-02-2009, 14:59:52
spotify!

awful for artists, great for consumers.

Immortal Wombat
24-02-2009, 17:52:47
like radio

protein
24-02-2009, 18:58:42
search for a song and one second later it's streaming in very good quality. quite different to the radio. it's quite exciting and also slightly worrying.

Debaser
24-02-2009, 22:55:22
Less than a second, even on my old slow Mac with a slow and stolen internet connection.

Pretty cool so far. Now I just need to find a dodgy way of ripping the music...

Scud Wallaby
24-02-2009, 23:13:53
I downloaded this - think it's not bad at all but in the FAQ's it says;

There should be significantly fewer ads in Spotify than you’d find on commercial radio. We are trying to strike a balance between artists who want to be paid and providing the best possible user experience.

Does this mean the artists get a bit of royalty for either allowing their music to be available or each time it's played (or neither - seems a bit unfair).

I'd like to see a feature where you could get recommended maybe lesser known music based on listening habits. I remember having some widget on the internet about 10 years ago where you marked out of 10 a variety of artists and you got a custom made radio station. Discovered loads of new artists that way.

protein
25-02-2009, 00:54:40
i remember that, that was cool. i guess it was ten years too early.

realistically we can expect permanent broadband internet connections very soon on our phones, pdas, in our cars, on our watches or whatever. with services like this, i really can see the end of physical records/cds sales.

who would buy a physical record now? unless you enjoy the thirty seconds of looking at the sleeve before you upload it to your phone/watch/pda. physical product is actually a hindrance now.

publishers used to only sell sheet music until the record came along and then completely changed their industry to exploitation of sound copyrights. i think this will be that sort of monumental shift.

considering that i make my living selling records i find this whole thing terrifying. but as a consumer it's lovely. it could be an opportunity, it could be the death of the industry.

if i was doing what i'm doing now ten years ago, i could fully expect to be making really, really good money by now. with the amount of fans we have, i could expect a gold record on my wall too. now everyone in the industry is fucked. unless you are coldplay.

Debaser
25-02-2009, 07:07:10
Originally posted by protein
i remember that, that was cool. i guess it was ten years too early.

Do you mean LastFM? Loads of people still use it.

Scabrous Birdseed
25-02-2009, 11:16:44
I dislike Spotify for a variety of reasons, but still use it occasionally. My ex uses it all the time, though, but she listens to music way differently from me.

I really don't like that it's got absolutely no music-recommendation features and only lets you listen to stuff you already know of. (In which case I can just get it off torrents anyway, or rapidshare.) The tagging is really weak so you can't in most cases dig further from a given artist or song, there's no hyperlinking at all. The search functionality sucks and you can't for instance, search by genre or year or any advanced combination searches. It's all like a big step backwards.

Plus albums don't make it on there for months after release and as someone who mostly listens to new music that's a huge annoyance. And of course there's the lack of most of the stuff I listen to in the library anyway... Weak on non-western music, weak on hip-hop mixtapes, weak on a lot of high-profile box sets and shit...

protein
25-02-2009, 16:55:51
Originally posted by Debaser
Do you mean LastFM? Loads of people still use it.
no, there was this application similar to spotify. can't for the life of me remember the name.

lightblue
25-02-2009, 17:25:08
Pandora?

protein
25-02-2009, 17:39:15
i'll never remember. there was a sliding scale of whether you liked or disliked a song and then it would taylor music to your tastes. unfortunately it got things dramatically wrong sometimes. like you'd say you like the cure and it would assume that you like nine inch nails. or you'd say you think chemical brothers are alright then it would give you a load of cheesy trance music. .p

Drekkus
04-03-2009, 11:00:41
Originally posted by protein
i remember that, that was cool. i guess it was ten years too early.

realistically we can expect permanent broadband internet connections very soon on our phones, pdas, in our cars, on our watches or whatever. with services like this, i really can see the end of physical records/cds sales.

who would buy a physical record now? unless you enjoy the thirty seconds of looking at the sleeve before you upload it to your phone/watch/pda. physical product is actually a hindrance now.

publishers used to only sell sheet music until the record came along and then completely changed their industry to exploitation of sound copyrights. i think this will be that sort of monumental shift.

considering that i make my living selling records i find this whole thing terrifying. but as a consumer it's lovely. it could be an opportunity, it could be the death of the industry.

if i was doing what i'm doing now ten years ago, i could fully expect to be making really, really good money by now. with the amount of fans we have, i could expect a gold record on my wall too. now everyone in the industry is fucked. unless you are coldplay.
Isn't it so that many more people around the world know and love your music because of the wide and easy availability of it? 15 years ago the music company might have decided to scrap your contract because it didn't have enough mass appeal? You would have been fighting for scarce airplay on the radio with a 1000 other bands to get some recognition.

Doesn't the businessmodel shift to more or less free available music that leads to bigger concertticket sales? Record companies are still trying to decide when and how I should listen to music (and make you pay alomost the same amount of money for an album that you buy online with next to zero distribution costs). If I hear a song I like, I want to listen to it any time and place I like. If I have to pay a small premium on that, no problem (as long as it's proportionate).

Drekkus
04-03-2009, 11:22:39
is Spotify different then Qtrax?

Lazarus and the Gimp
05-03-2009, 17:37:45
A word of warning---

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/technology/technologynews/4939614/Spotify-user-data-compromised-after-service-hacked.html

Immortal Wombat
21-03-2009, 16:13:45
Somewhat overstated, apparently (http://despotify.se/#criticism).

^ discovered by accident. I like the idea of an open-source Spotify client (not least because it doesn't have the ads), but then it doesn't work for free accounts anyway (yet).

It would be pretty cool to get it ported to a mobile platform though.