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View Full Version : Who's due for a revival?


Lazarus and the Gimp
10-05-2002, 23:01:44
Right- which great lost bands need a revival? I'm up for The Psychedelic Furs, having had "Dumb Waiters" and "Pretty in Pink" blasting earlier.

Snapcase
10-05-2002, 23:11:35
Revival in what sense? Most of the ones sorely in need of a re-evaluation are either dead or split up. :)

Snapcase
10-05-2002, 23:21:58
As for Genres that could do with revival: I wouldn't mind seing someone try to bring The Blues into soul again. A blues guitarist or two to a crackin' Timbaland beat would be awesome. Actually, soul instrumentals in general are criminally neglected these days- think what moder Urban producers could create if they were allowed to ignore the Rappers and Singers.

A band that should be revived: The Paragons. Epitomising the rocksteady combination of Melancholy, Party Moods, Vocal Harmonies and Intricate Baseline Craftmanship, they really have been quite neglected since they split up before reggae hit worldwide. Sure, "Tide is High" was made into an indifferent blondie hit in the eighties, but other than that... Solid albums, too.

Vincent Fandango
11-05-2002, 07:22:01
The Beatles

Sean
11-05-2002, 07:38:37
Originally posted by Snapcase
Epitomising the rocksteady combination of Melancholy, Party Moods, Vocal Harmonies and Intricate Baseline Craftmanship
Are those all really genres? What kind of party?

Lazarus and the Gimp
11-05-2002, 07:42:02
Originally posted by Snapcase
Revival in what sense? Most of the ones sorely in need of a re-evaluation are either dead or split up. :)

Revival in the sense of getting some articles in the music press, a "greatest hits" collection released, interviews with surviving members and introducing them to a new generation. Durrrrr.....

Snapcase
11-05-2002, 11:20:08
Originally posted by Sean

Are those all really genres? What kind of party?

No, no. The ultimate Rocksteady song should be about partying, but set up in such a way as to suggest that the person (prefferably people) singing are a little bit sad, a little bit whistful, often in stark opposition to the lyrics. Also significant in Rocksteady, and what sets it appart from most other Jamaican styles, are the extremely intricated syncopated melodic basslines. Classic example of the former, but not as much of the latter would be Delroy Wilson's "I'm in a dancing mood", one of the very first rocksteady tracks, and of course the most seminal of all, "Rocksteady" by Alton Ellis.

Snapcase
11-05-2002, 11:21:20
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp


Revival in the sense of getting some articles in the music press, a "greatest hits" collection released, interviews with surviving members and introducing them to a new generation. Durrrrr.....

I vaguely realised that after making the first post. Therefore the the second one.

How about a good, comprehensive Johnny Thunders box to go with the recent Richard Hell and Patti Smith ones?

Lazarus and the Gimp
11-05-2002, 19:06:22
With the Strokes and Hives et al, there's already a load of interest in late-70's Americana. The early 80's are pretty much ignored.

Snapcase
11-05-2002, 19:09:15
That's because they suck.

Lazarus and the Gimp
11-05-2002, 19:15:16
That's the attitude that makes a revival a good idea. Slap out some Psychedelic Furs, Specials, Madness, Joy Division, Teardrop Explodes, Coil, Soft Cell, Birthday Party, Cocteau Twins, Husker Du, Jesus and Mary Chain and let the good times roll.

PosterBoy
12-05-2002, 22:41:28
The Replacements!!!

It would bury Guns and Roses for good then.

Snapcase
12-05-2002, 22:50:12
Of the ones I've heard from that list, the early eighties were the absolute indubiable low point in Rock 'n' Roll history. :) Soft Cell??? :rolleyes:

Gawd I hate synth pop, post punk, hardcore, two tone and the lot of it. Meaningless, smoothed-out cover music.

How about a Calypso revival? That would be fun.

Sean
12-05-2002, 23:00:08
Captain Beefheart, the antithesis of most music today.

Snapcase
12-05-2002, 23:14:18
Actually, Safe As Milk, easily his best album, isn't that far from much of today's music.

Sean
12-05-2002, 23:16:20
Easily? Easily?! Are you quoting again, Mr. Case?

Snapcase
12-05-2002, 23:21:47
Okay, "Easily his best album out of the three I've heard, far surpassing his supposed masterpiece Trout Mask Replica" then. I was under the impression that he continued making music in the TMR vein after that album, which means Safe As Milk simply MUST be his best album because that's where he does his great garage-country-blues-soul thang.

Vincent Fandango
13-05-2002, 06:29:40
Obviously

Funkodrom
13-05-2002, 09:13:34
There already is an 80's revival Iron Maiden and Judas Priest are doing great.

;)

PosterBoy
14-05-2002, 14:03:18
I tried to start a revival for the Goombay Dance Band but it didn't take off unfortunately :(

Funkodrom
14-05-2002, 14:07:30
That'd be more of a vival I think.

Provost Harrison
14-05-2002, 19:05:53
Come back Showaddywaddy! Time for their revival :lol:

Lazarus and the Gimp
14-05-2002, 22:01:21
Originally posted by Snapcase
Of the ones I've heard from that list, the early eighties were the absolute indubiable low point in Rock 'n' Roll history. :) Soft Cell??? :rolleyes:

Gawd I hate synth pop, post punk, hardcore, two tone and the lot of it. Meaningless, smoothed-out cover music.

How about a Calypso revival? That would be fun.

There we go again. Vast slices of music dismissed with no basis. How much Soft Cell have you heard? How much Hardcore can be dismissed as "cover music"?

Snapcase
14-05-2002, 22:11:09
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp

There we go again. Vast slices of music dismissed with no basis. How much Soft Cell have you heard? How much Hardcore can be dismissed as "cover music"?

One Soft Cell song, easily the worst cover ever made, bettered by Marilyn Manson for godssakes. For the record, I've also only ever heard one A1 song, one Blue song, and one song by Mr. Blobby.

Hardcore I just dislike, the rest of the early eighties seems all about taking what's good from other musical eras and making it into a bland, ill-produced mess.

Provost Harrison
14-05-2002, 22:18:21
That is all any mainstream music has been about though, really...

Snapcase
14-05-2002, 22:34:00
Not at all. At it's best, wholly commercial mainstream music has driven the staind musical scene forwards by leaps and bounds. Mainly this occured between the late fifties and the end of the sixties, with greats like Phil Spector, The Beatles, the entire Motown phenomenon, what have you doing their stuff, but it certainly has popped up intermittedly since. Parts of disco c:a 1976 had some brilliant, groundbreaking and daring production, ditto lots of Urban R&B since about 1996.

Even I ;), who likes commercial music and thinks self-imposed "alternativity" is stupid and elitist think that the eighties as a whole represented a low point for it, though. If I ever have to hear Lionel Ritchie again I'll scream.

devilmunchkin
15-05-2002, 02:44:40
siouxsie and the banchees
tears for fears
cyndi lauper
maybe danzig

MattHiggs
15-05-2002, 07:40:40
Parts of disco c:a 1976 had some brilliant, groundbreaking and daring production

Maybe, but disco music is shite!

Snapcase
15-05-2002, 10:22:58
Oh, that's right, go join the early-eighties "Disco Sux" movement and start burning records.

Vincent Fandango
15-05-2002, 10:25:33
You mean the Bee Gees, Olivia Newton-John and Travolta, right.
My favourite is the Xanadu thingy with my old friend and Spargelstecher Jeff Lynne. Argh!