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paiktis
09-09-2008, 21:26:45
Isn't the law all that is important?

I have the law on my side.
People have different opinions but it doesn't matter! Because the LAW is here and it WILL protect you!
The law understands what is fair. It is the culmination of all our core common beliefs. It is impartial and blind.
I think the law is the greatest thing on this earth.
I have trust in the law.

paiktis
09-09-2008, 21:28:38
The law. In western fashion, democratic and progressive the sum of all that society deems is fair. No rhetorics, no superficial arguments, no empathy or control freakness. Just the law. Pure, simple crystal flawless, inpenetrable and solid.
One law, one son, one life.

TCO
09-09-2008, 21:29:07
I worry about you some times, Paiktis. Maybe you need to join the Army or something.

paiktis
09-09-2008, 21:45:05
Why?

paiktis
09-09-2008, 21:52:38
I was trying to find a satyire by decimus junius which was great. his reasons for leaving rome. and i remembered walking with a girlfriend on the attican road underneath the acropolis talking about crap (literally because there was a big sign decribing the genious of the ancient sewage system).
Don't you sometimes feel like if you have held yourself together and others would have just waited then they would be there the moment you need them?

But I can't really create with you TCO around. You're like mud clinging to my shoes. Too literal, too squared. Undevelloped. Doesn't mean I don't like you (not at all) but you're like a gravitational force down to the mundane.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
09-09-2008, 22:33:16
Or to the ancient sewage system.

Oerdin
09-09-2008, 23:11:50
He does kind of smell bad. ;)

TCO
09-09-2008, 23:16:35
You smelled very lavendery.

Greg W
10-09-2008, 00:56:29
Yeah, except then lawyers (in all their incarnations) and judges fuck around with the law, twisting and bending it until it is as muddy as said sewer systems (no offense Dyl, speaking in generalisations here ;) ).Don't you sometimes feel like if you have held yourself together and others would have just waited then they would be there the moment you need them?Yep. Welcome to hindsight. Wonderful thing. And possibly remorse as well. Wonderful if you learn from it. :)

Bob
10-09-2008, 07:31:47
law law law is a great song

King_Ghidra
10-09-2008, 09:15:06
how do you like it?

MoSe
10-09-2008, 09:18:09
LOL


hindsight....
are you talking of that 3rd eye in the back of your head/neck?

MoSe
10-09-2008, 09:20:01
Originally posted by Greg W
Welcome to hindsight. Wonderful thing. And possibly remorse as well. Wonderful if you learn from it. :)

who was that Greek philosopher who said "experience is a lamp lighting the road behind us"?
(or was it oscar wilde?)

MoSe
10-09-2008, 09:20:54
and who was the one who sang:

I fought the law
(and the law won)

?

King_Ghidra
10-09-2008, 09:23:00
Here's a tip: If you don't press Post Reply every 30 seconds you can put multiple thoughts in one post.

MoSe
10-09-2008, 09:26:59
does it relly make a difference?
I'd have liked the above posts to be kept individually separates anyway

unless you're inviting me to only Post Reply once a day, as a mean to get my posting reduced

Bob
10-09-2008, 09:28:07
Yeah, no one reads big posts

King_Ghidra
10-09-2008, 09:29:49
Originally posted by MoSe
does it relly make a difference?


Yes because i have to click the special button to read your posts and it takes a lot longer when there's more of them.

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:07:33
LOL

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:07:56
serves

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:08:18
you

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:08:42
well

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:12:52
I'd abide were we on lazyview...

Dyl Ulenspiegel
10-09-2008, 11:18:06
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Yes because i have to click the special button to read your posts and it takes a lot longer when there's more of them.

MoSe is specjial.

MoSe
10-09-2008, 11:26:10
Originally posted by paiktis
I was trying to find a satyire by decimus junius

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decimus_Brutus
?

maybe this one
http://encyclopedia.farlex.com/Decimus+Junius+Juvenalis

http://www.worldofquotes.com/author/Juvenal-(Decimus-Junius-Juvenal)/1/index.html

"Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country."

:eek:
was JFK a plagiarist then?
;)

paiktis
10-09-2008, 20:34:50
I'm very dissapointed. A greek professor took it on himself to make a poem out of decimus junius juvena's satyre l and it was great.
but the original text is too heavy not at all perky and cumbersome.

but i found it. it's not like the poem at all. it's serious. the poem was very very funny slim and fast.


http://www.tertullian.org/fathers/juvenal_satires_03.htm

paiktis
10-09-2008, 20:38:41
:D

"And now let me speak at once of the race which is most dear to our rich men, and which I avoid above all others; no shyness shall stand in my way.

I cannot abide, Quirites, a Rome of Greeks;

and yet what fraction of our dregs comes from Greece? The Syrian Orontes has long since poured into the Tiber, bringing with it its lingo and its manners, its flutes and its slanting harp-strings:6 bringing too the timbrels of the breed, and the trulls who are bidden ply their trade at the Circus. Out upon you, all ye that delight in foreign strumpets with painted headdresses! Your country clown, Quirinus, now trips to dinner in Greek-fangled slippers,7 and wears niceterian 7 ornaments upon a ceromatic 7 neck! One comes from lofty Sicyon, another from Amydon or Andros, others from Samos, Tralles or Alabanda; all making for the Esquiline, or for the hill that takes its name from osier-beds 8; all ready to worm their way into the houses of the great and become their masters. Quick of wit and of unbounded impudence, they are as ready of speech as Isaeus,9 and more torrential. Say, what do you think that fellow there to be? He has brought with him any character you please; grammarian, orator, geometrician; painter, trainer, or rope-dancer; augur, doctor or astrologer:----

'All sciences a fasting monsieur knows,
And bid him go to Hell, to Hell he goes!' 10

In fine, the man who took to himself wings 11 was not a Moor, nor a Sarmatian, nor a Thracian, but one born in the very heart of Athens!

"Must I not make my escape from purple-clad gentry like these? Is a man to sign his name before me, and recline upon a couch above mine, who has been wafted to Rome by the wind which brings us our damsons and our figs? Is it to go so utterly for nothing that as a babe I drank in the air of the Aventine, and was nurtured on the Sabine berry?

"What of this again, that these people are experts in flattery, and will commend the talk of an illiterate, or the beauty of a deformed, friend, and compare the scraggy neck of some weakling to the brawny throat of Hercules when holding up Antaeus 12 from the earth; or go into ecstasies over a squeaky voice not more melodious than that of a cock when he pecks his spouse the hen? We, no doubt, can praise the same things that they do; but what they say is believed. Could any actor do better when he plays the part of Thais, or of a matron, or of the nude Doris? You would never think that it was an actor that was speaking, but a very woman, complete in all her parts. Yet, in their own country, neither Antiochus 13 nor Stratocles,13 neither Demetrius 13 nor the delicate Haemus,13 will be applauded: they are a nation of play-actors. If you smile, your Greek will split his sides with laughter; if he sees his friend drop a tear, he weeps, though without grieving; if you call for a bit of fire in winter-time, he puts on his cloak; if you say 'I am hot,' he breaks into a sweat. Thus we are not upon a level, he and I; he has always the best of it, being ready at any moment, by night or by day, to take his expression from another man's face, to throw up his hands and applaud if his friend spit or hiccup nicely, or if his golden basin make a gurgle when turned upside down.

"Besides all this, there is nothing sacred to his lusts: not the matron of the family, nor the maiden daughter, not the as yet unbearded son-in-law to be, not even the as yet unpolluted son; if none of these be there, he will debauch the grandmother. These men want to discover the secrets of the family, and so make themselves feared. And now that I am speaking of the Greeks, pass on to the schools, and hear of a graver crime; the Stoic 14 who informed against and slew his own young friend and disciple 15 was born on that river bank 16 where the Gorgon's winged steed fell to earth. No: there is no room for any Roman here, where some Protogenes, or Diphilus, or Hermarchus rules the roast----one who by a defect of his race never shares a friend, but keeps him all to himself. For when once he has dropped into a facile ear one particle of his own and his country's poison, I am thrust from the door, and all my long years of servitude go for nothing. Nowhere is it so easy as at Rome to throw an old client overboard.

Rather heavy greek bashing :D
the professor was very kind and smart in writing a peom based on this "Anti-greek" roman approach :D he very much flattered decimus

TCO
11-09-2008, 00:15:08
hairy fooker

Provost Harrison
11-09-2008, 08:50:06
WTFP?

Dyl Ulenspiegel
11-09-2008, 08:57:29
That xenophobic roman bastard.

Drekkus
11-09-2008, 08:58:52
Originally posted by paiktis
:D

"And now let me speak at once of the race which is most dear to our rich men, and which I avoid above all others; no shyness shall stand in my way.

I cannot abide, Quirites, a Rome of Greeks;

and yet what fraction of our dregs comes from Greece? The Syrian Orontes has long since poured into the Tiber, bringing with it its lingo and its manners, its flutes and its slanting harp-strings:6 bringing too the timbrels of the breed, and the trulls who are bidden ply their trade at the Circus. Out upon you, all ye that delight in foreign strumpets with painted headdresses! Your country clown, Quirinus, now trips to dinner in Greek-fangled slippers,7 and wears niceterian 7 ornaments upon a ceromatic 7 neck! One comes from lofty Sicyon, another from Amydon or Andros, others from Samos, Tralles or Alabanda; all making for the Esquiline, or for the hill that takes its name from osier-beds 8; all ready to worm their way into the houses of the great and become their masters. Quick of wit and of unbounded impudence, they are as ready of speech as Isaeus,9 and more torrential. Say, what do you think that fellow there to be? He has brought with him any character you please; grammarian, orator, geometrician; painter, trainer, or rope-dancer; augur, doctor or astrologer:----

'All sciences a fasting monsieur knows,
And bid him go to Hell, to Hell he goes!' 10

In fine, the man who took to himself wings 11 was not a Moor, nor a Sarmatian, nor a Thracian, but one born in the very heart of Athens!

"Must I not make my escape from purple-clad gentry like these? Is a man to sign his name before me, and recline upon a couch above mine, who has been wafted to Rome by the wind which brings us our damsons and our figs? Is it to go so utterly for nothing that as a babe I drank in the air of the Aventine, and was nurtured on the Sabine berry?

"What of this again, that these people are experts in flattery, and will commend the talk of an illiterate, or the beauty of a deformed, friend, and compare the scraggy neck of some weakling to the brawny throat of Hercules when holding up Antaeus 12 from the earth; or go into ecstasies over a squeaky voice not more melodious than that of a cock when he pecks his spouse the hen? We, no doubt, can praise the same things that they do; but what they say is believed. Could any actor do better when he plays the part of Thais, or of a matron, or of the nude Doris? You would never think that it was an actor that was speaking, but a very woman, complete in all her parts. Yet, in their own country, neither Antiochus 13 nor Stratocles,13 neither Demetrius 13 nor the delicate Haemus,13 will be applauded: they are a nation of play-actors. If you smile, your Greek will split his sides with laughter; if he sees his friend drop a tear, he weeps, though without grieving; if you call for a bit of fire in winter-time, he puts on his cloak; if you say 'I am hot,' he breaks into a sweat. Thus we are not upon a level, he and I; he has always the best of it, being ready at any moment, by night or by day, to take his expression from another man's face, to throw up his hands and applaud if his friend spit or hiccup nicely, or if his golden basin make a gurgle when turned upside down.

"Besides all this, there is nothing sacred to his lusts: not the matron of the family, nor the maiden daughter, not the as yet unbearded son-in-law to be, not even the as yet unpolluted son; if none of these be there, he will debauch the grandmother. These men want to discover the secrets of the family, and so make themselves feared. And now that I am speaking of the Greeks, pass on to the schools, and hear of a graver crime; the Stoic 14 who informed against and slew his own young friend and disciple 15 was born on that river bank 16 where the Gorgon's winged steed fell to earth. No: there is no room for any Roman here, where some Protogenes, or Diphilus, or Hermarchus rules the roast----one who by a defect of his race never shares a friend, but keeps him all to himself. For when once he has dropped into a facile ear one particle of his own and his country's poison, I am thrust from the door, and all my long years of servitude go for nothing. Nowhere is it so easy as at Rome to throw an old client overboard.

Rather heavy greek bashing :D
the professor was very kind and smart in writing a peom based on this "Anti-greek" roman approach :D he very much flattered decimus That looks like a Paiktis post alright

King_Ghidra
11-09-2008, 09:30:08
Originally posted by paiktis


"Besides all this, there is nothing sacred to his lusts: not the matron of the family, nor the maiden daughter, not the as yet unbearded son-in-law to be, not even the as yet unpolluted son; if none of these be there, he will debauch the grandmother.

:lol: