PDA

View Full Version : 2nd world war stories


protein
17-06-2008, 19:27:27
anyone know of a good book that is a collection of 2nd world war veteran's stories?

i was just thinking that that would be an amazing read.

jsorense
17-06-2008, 20:41:34
From whose point of view:
Soviet;
German;
French;
British;
Italian;
Polish;
Anzac;
Japanese;
The Winner?
:cute:

Lazarus and the Gimp
17-06-2008, 22:01:40
Just get "The World at War" on DVD. That's the definitive programme.

protein
17-06-2008, 22:23:29
i'm thinking of something to read on planes. i've got flights to japan, america, australia, barcelona and germany in the next couple of months.

any perspective. they are all equally fascinating. perhaps some european stories first?

JM^3
17-06-2008, 22:31:48
I liked reading a story about/by Desmond Doss when I was a kid (US Conscientious Objector who was awarded the The Congressional Medal of Honor for saving lives on the battle field).

I don't remember many names, I have some books at home also, I mostly just read random books.

JM
(note that the guy was very religious)

C.G.B. Spender
18-06-2008, 07:07:03
Slaughterhouse 5

MoSe
18-06-2008, 13:06:06
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Just get "The World at War" on DVD. That's the definitive programme. Originally posted by protein
i'm thinking of something to read on planes. i've got flights to japan, america, australia, barcelona and germany in the next couple of months.

don't the main intercontinental flights offer individual CD/DVD readers embedded in the back of the seat in front of you?

Greg W
18-06-2008, 13:14:44
Though technically they're not collections of stories by veterans, they were researched with the aid of veterans. I've only really read Aussie based books, but these two were great:

A Bastard of a Place by Peter Brune
Good book about the Aussies (and Americans) in Papua New Guinea, and in particular Milne Bay, Gona,
Buna and Sanananda. Along with the Kokoda trail, one of the most enduring war stories/theatres after Gallipoli in our history.

Gallipoli by Les Carlyon
About the landings by the ANZAC forces in Turkey in WWI. Amazing story of a struggle against the odds, poor organisation, terrible leadership and an impossible terrain.

I also have "The Great War" by Les Carlyon, but am yet to read it, all about the Aussies in WWI.

No idea if you can get your hands on them, but they're good reads if you can manage to find them. Or pick them up while you are in Oz if they interest you.

C.G.B. Spender
18-06-2008, 13:45:59
And technically WWI is not the 2nd world war

jsorense
18-06-2008, 14:43:07
See if "The Good War: An Oral History of World War II" by Studs Terkel sounds interesting to you. It is quite famous.
j

Greg W
18-06-2008, 15:01:48
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
And technically WWI is not the 2nd world war Technically, yeah, but if you've seen one World War...

Kitsuki
18-06-2008, 15:49:56
I would recommend -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Forgotten-Voices-Second-World-War/dp/0091897343

The whole Forgotten Voices series is really good - they are coordinated through the Imperial War Museum. Most are WW1 and WW2, but there are ones from less written about conflicts too.

I would also really recommend Fighter Boys and Bomber Boys by Patrick Bishop. They read like stories - although they are historical narrative - because he chops and changes between about 6-8 different pilots and their experiences. In can be quite upsetting when one you have been following with interest throughout the book "buys it." The first book deals with The Battle of Britain, the second with our counter bombing campaigns from the end of the BoB onwards.

Kitsuki
18-06-2008, 15:51:04
Link for Fighter Boys -

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fighter-Boys-Saving-Britain-1940/dp/0006532047/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1213804226&sr=1-1

Amazon are doing both books for 7 - bargain!

Kitsuki
18-06-2008, 15:55:01
Originally posted by jsorense
From whose point of view:
Soviet;
German;
French;
British;
Italian;
Polish;
Anzac;
Japanese;
The Winner?
:cute:

You seem to have repeated yourself here, you could have just written the British Commonwealth once... ;)

jsorense
18-06-2008, 18:47:37
Although I have not read it Band of Brothers : E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler's Eagle's Nest
by Stephen E. Ambrose is certainly eposodic and focuses on individual's experiences, albeit, from a US point of view.
However, for something more epic think about A Bridge Too Far: The Classic History of the Greatest Battle of World War II
by Cornelius Ryan. It includes stories from Dultch, Brithish, German, Polish and US points of view. I highly recommend it.

Kitsuki
18-06-2008, 20:22:01
Actually, good point jsorense - Stephen Ambrose wrote about 6 books revolving around WW2 - they are available as a set too. The other one in the series that is particularly good is Pegasus Bridge - the first action of D-Day with British troops landing in gliders.

jsorense
18-06-2008, 23:37:06
Yes, a great mission. One of the only airbourne missions that went off as planned.:bounce:

Walrus Feeder
19-06-2008, 01:18:56
There's a good book called 'Bomber Crew' which gives accounts of how men took part in raid after raid over Germany where casualties among bomber crew were usually high etc. If you've seen Memphis Belle its probably echoes that but on the British side.

Kitsuki
24-06-2008, 18:30:10
What did you buy in the end Protein?

The Shaker
02-07-2008, 18:41:37
Late as usual,
but i thought both forgotten voices and fighter boys were good.
The Forgotten voices narative is formed from timeline of pieced together interviews.

Fighter boys is more traditional style, but possibly more readable.

Scabrous Birdseed
02-07-2008, 23:25:33
Spike Milligan's war memoirs are not bad.