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MOBIUS
08-11-2007, 13:45:40
The lost wars: Britain's Malayan campaigns
A dispute over the right to wear medals at the Cenotaph has revived interest in two conflicts that have been swept under the carpet of history. Andy McSmith reports
Published: 08 November 2007

It is odd how little the British know about certain wars that were fought by our soldiers, in our name, not so many years ago. Other nations celebrate their military victories, and gloss over defeats, but not the British. Two of our most decisive victories of the past half-century have been hidden away in the undergrowth of Asian jungles.

Ask someone to list countries in the world where a Western army fought a Communist army at any time during the Cold War, and the first answer will almost certainly be Vietnam; after that, Korea, and then perhaps someone with a decent knowledge of post war history might say Greece. Very few would think of Malaya. Fewer still would be able to put a name to the island in Asia where the bodies of hundreds of British soldiers lie lost in the jungle, killed in a conflict about which the British public was told almost nothing.

The lost wars: Britain's Malayan campaigns (http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article3138365.ece)

Ah the usual double standards and callous disregard for the men who valiantly gave up their lives fighting for our country...
:rolleyes:

King_Ghidra
08-11-2007, 14:08:54
Considering the Korean war is virtually unknown to most brits, these conflicts (also suffering from the denial that they were wars in the first place) certainly don't have much chance.

Funko
08-11-2007, 14:18:14
We didn't have Ross Kemp to go and make a documentary on it.

C.G.B. Spender
08-11-2007, 14:19:50
You call that a lost war?

MOBIUS
08-11-2007, 15:39:02
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Considering the Korean war is virtually unknown to most brits, these conflicts (also suffering from the denial that they were wars in the first place) certainly don't have much chance.

Yes, but it’s a well known fact that the average Brit know fuck all anyway…

Point is the Korean War has been mentioned in the news on a relatively regular basis down the years, whereas these two effectively have not.

I personally only know about them in the context of being interested in that sort of thing anyway – however I still know infinitely more about the Korean War than I do either of these.

CGB: Lost in the context of our powers that be misplacing it on purpose…

MoSe
08-11-2007, 15:56:22
Guatemala? Nicaragua? Chile?

maroule
08-11-2007, 16:14:17
they were talking extensively about the Malaysian campaign in the Economist two weeks ago

MOBIUS
08-11-2007, 16:41:54
The average person in the street is most likely too stupid to be able to read the Economist, let alone actually want to read it...

Funko
08-11-2007, 17:17:53
It's not the public's fault. The Economist should put more celeb gossip and scantily clad glamour models in it.

maroule
08-11-2007, 18:18:28
Originally posted by MOBIUS
The average person in the street is most likely too stupid to be able to read the Economist, let alone actually want to read it...


you bet, if the average person in the street was reading the Economist, all its readers would stop reading it immediately

King_Ghidra
09-11-2007, 09:47:26
:D

Oerdin
10-11-2007, 14:42:25
I like the US rule. Foreign medals may be worn but must be on a different side of the dress uniform from those awarded by the US government. Basically, foreign medals are honorary medals only (not giving promotion or retirement points) but considered note worthy enough to be officially given a place on the dress uniform.

Beta1
10-11-2007, 20:19:48
thats a good idea but in the UK a medal worn on the "wrong" side shows that the medal was not awarded to the wearer but is worn by them in remembrance - at the remembrance day parades you see people with their relative's medals if they are not able to be there themselves.

Drekkus
12-11-2007, 09:13:23
Maybe they can wear them at the back.

I find it a bit weird to see people parade their relatives' medals. If you can't be there, too bad. I would feel pretty awkward if I were to walk among real veterans in a parade, like some hero by proxy.

maroule
12-11-2007, 09:17:40
doesn't seem to bother the millions of people who say, in tabloids or on the net, "we, the US, English, etc. won the war, and you, the Italians, French, etc. are just cowards or surrenderers!!" (replace nations as you see fit)

I've seen quite a few people, including here, taking a lot of credit for the heroics of others...

Drekkus
12-11-2007, 09:43:07
That what the internets are for, being a real hero online.