PDA

View Full Version : You can get a burger with chilli on it...


Funko
12-10-2007, 16:20:31
Why can't you get a curry burger?

Resource Consumer
12-10-2007, 16:37:27
Isn't chilli con carni sort of a burger haché?

The Mad Monk
12-10-2007, 16:54:51
What's a hache?

Drake Tungsten
13-10-2007, 04:04:15
Americans don't eat curry and Indians don't eat burgers, so neither country is going to put burgers and curry together for you. You could do it for yourself, but Britain seems utterly incapable of culinary innovation. All you can do is steal from more vibrant cultures, which just isn't going to get you a curry burger.

zmama
13-10-2007, 07:13:33
hmm a lamb burger with a curry sauce sounds good

Vincent
13-10-2007, 07:56:18
eat a currywurst!

Shining1
13-10-2007, 11:31:44
If you want something done properly, I guess you do have do it yourself. =)

Dyl Ulenspiegel
13-10-2007, 12:24:49
As Vincent says. Or put the currywurst into a burger.

mr_B
13-10-2007, 12:31:21
and eat it

Dyl Ulenspiegel
13-10-2007, 15:57:57
Ah, Plan B.

Oerdin
14-10-2007, 01:40:42
Originally posted by zmama
hmm a lamb burger with a curry sauce sounds good

A local New Zealand restaurant named Bare Back's makes Lamb burgers. Never seen them offered with curry though.


Bare Lil Lamb - $8.99
Prime NZ lamb burger, bleu cheese crumbles with mini dressing, beet root, lettuce, tomato, red onion & BBQ sauce.

http://www.barebackgrill.com/

Funko
15-10-2007, 10:12:38
Lamb burgers are very common here.

Funko
15-10-2007, 10:16:49
Originally posted by Drake Tungsten
Americans don't eat curry and Indians don't eat burgers, so neither country is going to put burgers and curry together for you. You could do it for yourself, but Britain seems utterly incapable of culinary innovation. All you can do is steal from more vibrant cultures, which just isn't going to get you a curry burger.

I'm british and I just innovated a curry burger. Shove that up your arse!

"American" food is just stuff that Europeans, South Americans, Asians brought with them when they emigrated or Native Americans already ate.

British curry can be very different to what you get in India.

King_Ghidra
15-10-2007, 10:26:39
drake is an idiot - fact!

maybe we should get heston blumenthal on the case

King_Ghidra
15-10-2007, 10:27:27
oh and btw mike:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry_burger

Funko
15-10-2007, 10:50:07
Curse the internet.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
15-10-2007, 10:58:55
The curse of lemon curry.

MoSe
15-10-2007, 11:55:27
Originally posted by Funko
Lamb burgers are very common here.

IIRC before getting to your gig in that underground venue near the RR station, zmama and I had lamb kebab and ate it on the street, sitting at a but stop.
At least, mine was lamb.

Venom
15-10-2007, 12:02:06
Because curry is gross and burgers are awesome.

zmama
15-10-2007, 13:44:24
That kebab... might have been lamb.

but lamb tastes good so I'm skeptical

Dyl Ulenspiegel
15-10-2007, 14:28:17
Not necessarily in kebabs, though.

Funko
15-10-2007, 14:29:31
There's no way I'd eat a kebab from that place.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
15-10-2007, 14:34:37
Kebab ist Vertrauenssache.

MoSe
15-10-2007, 14:36:16
there must be some clause in the social contract

Dyl Ulenspiegel
15-10-2007, 14:37:05
That IS the clause

MoSe
15-10-2007, 14:45:02
Klaus Kebab, Konzentrationslagerführer

Chris
15-10-2007, 14:45:31
Originally posted by Funko
I'm british and I just innovated a curry burger. Shove that up your arse!

"American" food is just stuff that Europeans, South Americans, Asians brought with them when they emigrated or Native Americans already ate.

British curry can be very different to what you get in India. You culturally insensitive clod!

That burger is some Indian guy's uncle or something!

maroule
15-10-2007, 15:36:15
Originally posted by Resource Consumer
Isn't chilli con carni sort of a burger haché?

except if chilli suddenly became italian, that would be "carne", and it is done with minced beef meat

Funko
15-10-2007, 15:55:00
or chopped beef, or chopped pork, or minced pork...

Resource Consumer
15-10-2007, 18:53:28
Originally posted by MoSe
IIRC before getting to your gig in that underground venue near the RR station, zmama and I had lamb kebab and ate it on the street, sitting at a but stop.
At least, mine was lamb.

The words "kebab" and "but(t)" stop conjour some amazing images

maroule
16-10-2007, 07:43:03
Originally posted by Funko
or chopped beef, or chopped pork, or minced pork...


maybe "haché" is better translated by "chopped" rather than "minced", don't know the difference for sure. It has to be minced in rather large chunks.

The original recipe is with beef however, the other meats are variations. And it's actually tex-mex, not mexican (I found out in Mexico, when I was frustrated not to find it in all restaurants)

Oerdin
16-10-2007, 08:05:11
Yeah, Chili was invented in Texas not Mexico so in Mexico it is hard to find Chili unless you go to a Tex-Mex or American restaurant. The story I heard was that during the second half of the 19th century Cattle was still a huge business in Texas but pay was poor. These poor workers would often bought cheap cuts of meat from the tougher parts of the cow plus meat which was "ripe" was solid for even less. Thus everyone minced the cuts into ground beef so it wouldn't be as tough then spiced the hell out of it to disguise the spoiled taste.

Combine this with the western tradition of making lots of stews, toss in local crops like beans, and you've invented Chili. Mexicans invented a whole cuisine but Chili is 100% American in origin.

Funko
16-10-2007, 08:10:24
Like Indian's invented a huge array of different cooking styles utilising their many spices but Chicken Tikka Massala is a British dish. As are Balti, Korma or Passanda, Madras, Vindaloo or anything you might find on a standard British curry menu. (although there may be dishes with similar names in India, the versions we have are highly westernised)

Venom
16-10-2007, 12:02:17
I invented pie.

MoSe
16-10-2007, 12:26:00
Originally posted by maroule
except if chilli suddenly became italian, that would be "carne", and it is done with minced beef meat

BTW, I love (steak) tartare. I'm a precursor

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steak_tartare

The basis of the name is the legend that nomadic Tatar people of the Central Asian steppes did not have time to cook and thus placed meat underneath their horses' saddles.
The meat would be tenderised by the end of the journey.
...
This kind of burger was the original hamburger from Hamburg, Germany.
In Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and other cities where there is a large German population, the tartar steak, as it also is called, is very popular
...
Steak tartare is now regarded as a gourmet dish. It is especially popular in Belgium, France, the Czech Republic (Tatarák) and Switzerland. In Belgium, it is known as filet américain or American fillet. ... prepared (with eggs, seasonings, etc.) ... is also popular in the Netherlands. ... A variant ...(called tartarmad) is also present in the Danish lunch...



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tartare

The Russians adopted the dish with just beef under the name steak tartare and gradually added chopped onions and egg to the beef.

The tartare method had also reached China where Marco Polo encountered it for beef and other foods.

German sailors, especially from Hamburg, encountered the dish on trading missions in Russia. They brought the dish back to Germany where steak tartare became known as tartare steak.
It also gained the alternate name of Hamburg steak which became popular amongst the working class.

German immigrants brought the dish to the US in the late 18th and early 19th century where it became known as a hamburger. This dish was not served in bread or buns until the 1880s or 1890s.

The tartare method of food preparation declined the 20th century due to widespread use of antibiotics and factory farming, which increase the possibility of contracting a bacterial infection.
However, the (cooked) hamburger became one of the world's most popular dishes by the end of the 20th century.

In the early 21st century, tartare preparations have begun to re-appear on the menus of high-end restaurants.


Tatars -> Russia - > China
Russia -> Germany -> Milwaukee -> Texas -> Mexico (chili)
US -> back to jaded european gourmets, who reverted to consume it raw thanks to the higher hygiene standards making it safe :p

maroule
16-10-2007, 13:05:10
I love tartare
they are also called "steak cannibales" in Belgium

As a kid, I use to eat tartare of horse meat, my father, with his usually bizarre ideas, saying vehemently that "it was the only proper meat to have a tartare with".... I switched to beef fairly rapidly though... I tried horse again some years later, the meat was sweeter than beef but thinking about the horse kind of spoilt my appetite...

Funko
16-10-2007, 13:12:05
Horse is tasty.

King_Ghidra
16-10-2007, 13:19:26
My sister's boyfriend is a big fan of steak tartare. I said the fact that anyone could enjoy that was scary enough, but what i really coulnd't understand was how you find out you enjoy it in the first place. He said he ordered it by accident thinking it would be some variation on a normal steak.

MoSe
16-10-2007, 14:18:16
well, it's not much different from a very "au sang" steak or fillet, if you like them that way
How's the inside of your thick steaks, when you grill them? Many like it red.

and, sushi is raw fish after all

Funko
16-10-2007, 14:20:56
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
My sister's boyfriend is a big fan of steak tartare. I said the fact that anyone could enjoy that was scary enough, but what i really coulnd't understand was how you find out you enjoy it in the first place. He said he ordered it by accident thinking it would be some variation on a normal steak.

I found out because I had some of the "American fillet" at the lunch we had at Drekkus' house. It was tasty.

Although he did clarify that we weren't eating Americans.

MoSe
16-10-2007, 14:36:34
merging this with the Redskin thread:

what about Buck Burgers?

game meat is praised by many, despite (or *because* of) its stronger, wild taste

like deer, or even better, roe
if you want some fancy dressing for your pasta, you can sometimes find here boar, deer or roe sauce (along with hare and duck ones) on supermarket shelves

Funko
16-10-2007, 14:39:08
Venison burgers, yes, you can certainly get them.

King_Ghidra
16-10-2007, 14:54:10
Originally posted by Funko
I found out because I had some of the "American fillet" at the lunch we had at Drekkus' house. It was tasty.

Although he did clarify that we weren't eating Americans.

right yeah, it's the same in belgium, the 'fillet americain', my sister warned me off anything like that

MoSe
16-10-2007, 15:00:03
I didn't make you that squeamish

MoSe
16-10-2007, 15:02:24
Originally posted by Funko
Venison burgers, yes, you can certainly get them.

and I needed this thread to learn that venison is not some "elite beef" meat, or wild ones' like buffalo or bison, as I thought so far!

:clueless:

:lol:

MoSe
16-10-2007, 15:09:29
Venison jerky!

CURRY HUMBLE PIE!!!!

bastards, I now have terrible wrenching cravings....

;)

MoSe
16-10-2007, 15:23:23
a whole lotta inter-thread influence today!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiver_my_timbers


Harry: I say it's false.
John: False! Shiver my hulk, Mr. Buckskin, if you wore a lion's skin I'd CURRY you for this.



:lol:

Funko
16-10-2007, 15:39:38
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
right yeah, it's the same in belgium, the 'fillet americain', my sister warned me off anything like that

It was really tasty.

Venom
16-10-2007, 15:54:14
Round these parts you can get venison in any form. Sometimes it finds its way to the hood of your car.

MoSe
16-10-2007, 16:00:51
roadchilli burger

King_Ghidra
17-10-2007, 08:33:38
a drive thru

MoSe
17-10-2007, 09:05:46
:lol: