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TCO
14-08-2007, 11:37:24
"Every time I read Pride and Prejudice, I want to dig her up and bash her on the skull with her own shin bone."

Funko
14-08-2007, 11:41:50
Why keep reading it?

mr_B
14-08-2007, 11:43:41
Why reading it?

MoSe
14-08-2007, 11:51:17
unfathomable

Funko
14-08-2007, 11:52:11
Why the shin bone and not the femur?

MDA
14-08-2007, 11:53:30
yeah, the femur has nice heft to it, and the ball on the end makes a good striking surface

MoSe
14-08-2007, 11:56:27
Maybe he was fond of "Shin Bo the Ninja", one of the Heroes in Master of Magic

MoSe
14-08-2007, 11:57:06
Originally posted by mr_B
Why reading it?

Why Reading?

King_Ghidra
14-08-2007, 11:58:47
Originally posted by MoSe
Maybe he was fond of "Shin Bo the Ninja", one of the Heroes in Master of Magic

NERD

Funko
14-08-2007, 12:33:56
Originally posted by MDA
yeah, the femur has nice heft to it, and the ball on the end makes a good striking surface

Exactly, you don't see the ape at the beginning of 2001 picking up a shin bone to club his friends to death with do you?

Scabrous Birdseed
14-08-2007, 12:37:28
Ah, but they were short, squat, muscular apes. If I was a middle-aged human I'd pick a smaller bone. Maybe a Jawbone, if you want to go all biblical.

MDA
14-08-2007, 12:45:16
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
NERD

He was a hero in the original Masters of Magic as well!

:nervous:

Funko
14-08-2007, 12:51:44
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Ah, but they were short, squat, muscular apes. If I was a middle-aged human I'd pick a smaller bone. Maybe a Jawbone, if you want to go all biblical.

Bashing Jane Austen's skull in with her jaw bone sounds like a lot of effort. A human jawbone is pretty pathetic. You get a really short reach and it's awkwardly bent. If I was a middle-aged human picking a bone as a weapon I'd want the longest heaviest bone possible so I could do the most damage at the greatest range. If I was only picking a bone to smash a skull, I'd still want something weighty to make it easier.

Femur FTW.

Scabrous Birdseed
14-08-2007, 13:00:40
Could you use a spine+skull combo as a flail or would that require too much wiring?

Funko
14-08-2007, 13:04:05
It'd also be difficult to use. I'd be nervous.

C.G.B. Spender
14-08-2007, 13:27:15
I found out that it's far more easier to make a good sarcastic comment than writing a clever book.

It's also good if you make that comment with a Truman Capote style voice.

TCO
14-08-2007, 13:41:20
Twain has a bit of a Laz-like air to him, no?

C.G.B. Spender
14-08-2007, 13:44:02
You haven't read much Twain then

Lurker the Second
14-08-2007, 14:42:47
I guess smashing her skull in with her own skull would present some logistical problems.

MoSe
14-08-2007, 14:49:59
Originally posted by Funko
Exactly, you don't see the ape at the beginning of 2001 picking up a shin bone to club his friends to death with do you?

you mean before September 11th, huh?

mr_B
14-08-2007, 14:55:23
in a biblical way

Funko
14-08-2007, 15:22:27
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
I found out that it's far more easier to make a good sarcastic comment than writing a clever book.

Not easy enough though huh?

MoSe
14-08-2007, 15:24:30
yeah, better stick with the sniping remarks league

Lazarus and the Gimp
14-08-2007, 18:43:37
Originally posted by Funko
Exactly, you don't see the ape at the beginning of 2001 picking up a shin bone to club his friends to death with do you?


The apes at the beginning of 2001 were not Ladies.

Lazarus and the Gimp
14-08-2007, 18:49:26
Twain, on wanking-


The monkey is the only animal, except man, that practices this science; hence he is our brother; there is a bond of sympathy and relationship between us. Give this ingenious animal an audience of the proper kind, and he will straightway put aside his other affairs and take a whet; and you will see by the contortions and his ecstatic expression that he takes an intelligent and human interest in his performance.

Lazarus and the Gimp
14-08-2007, 18:51:39
Mark Twain was God's gift to 19th century literature. He single-handedly justifies the very existance of the USA. I'm a huge fan. The bloke had a brilliant sense of humour.

MDA
15-08-2007, 10:41:19
Originally posted by MoSe
Maybe he was fond of "Shin Bo the Ninja", one of the Heroes in Master of Magic

just realized I read that as "Heroes of Might and Magic" :rolleyes:

Funko
15-08-2007, 10:46:58
So did I.

Drekkus
15-08-2007, 12:39:22
I did not

mr_B
15-08-2007, 12:41:45
so didn't I.
I agree wizzzz Drekkus, cause his wife bought the wedding present for our friends.

Funko
15-08-2007, 12:42:49
I don't even know what Heroes of Might and Magic is, I've just heard it talked about here a lot. I assume it's a computer game.

mr_B
15-08-2007, 12:43:23
huh

C.G.B. Spender
15-08-2007, 12:47:46
Nerds

Drekkus
15-08-2007, 13:09:21
Originally posted by Funko
I don't even know what Heroes of Might and Magic is, I've just heard it talked about here a lot. I assume it's a computer game. But you do know what Heroes in Master and Magic is?

C.G.B. Spender
15-08-2007, 13:18:31
Everyone knows about Master of Magic

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_Magic

Judging from the size of the article it's more important than Status Quo

Drekkus
15-08-2007, 14:14:25
HA!! Heroes in Master and Magic is not equal Master of Magic

Vincent
15-08-2007, 19:38:51
Of course not. Did you take the yellow pills again?

KrazyHorse
16-08-2007, 06:53:09
Originally posted by TCO
"Every time I read Pride and Prejudice, I want to dig her up and bash her on the skull with her own shin bone."

I approve of the sentiment. It's exactly the way I feel about Virginia Woolf and To the Lighthouse.

C.G.B. Spender
16-08-2007, 07:06:21
I recommend you read Dieter Bohlen's "Nichts als die Wahrheit".

You don't even have to dig him up!

Dieter Bohlen
16-08-2007, 07:14:09
So eine Schei▀e!

TCO
16-08-2007, 22:45:31
Originally posted by KrazyHorse
I approve of the sentiment. It's exactly the way I feel about Virginia Woolf and To the Lighthouse.

So, how come you are all wet for Holden Caulfield, I mean Asher, I mean Holden Caulfield? ;)

Actually Austen is a hell of a lot better than Salinger. Catcher is just over-rated trifle. Austen's stuff has insight enought to be worth spending time on. To be annoyed for the implicit sexual insult to men.

TCO
16-08-2007, 22:47:22
P.s. I lured you back. I lured you back! :dance:

TCO
16-08-2007, 22:48:54
Actually, I think the more interesting thing is the wording of Twain. He really does carry well across the years.

Oerdin
16-08-2007, 22:57:49
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Ah, but they were short, squat, muscular apes. If I was a middle-aged human I'd pick a smaller bone. Maybe a Jawbone, if you want to go all biblical.

If you found a thin enough bone you could use it as a spear.

Lazarus and the Gimp
17-08-2007, 05:12:12
Originally posted by TCO
So, how come you are all wet for Holden Caulfield, I mean Asher, I mean Holden Caulfield? ;)

Actually Austen is a hell of a lot better than Salinger. Catcher is just over-rated trifle. Austen's stuff has insight enought to be worth spending time on. To be annoyed for the implicit sexual insult to men.


Bullshit. In "Catcher in the rye" Salinger captured adolescent angst with clinical accuracy. Austen is trite, bitchy nonsense hopelessly stranded in long-obsolete social values.

MoSe
17-08-2007, 07:35:19
I read Catcher (in english) after my 40s, and I was rather unimpressed.
Maybe I'm not educated enough to appreciate it, or not connected anymore with my youth feelings, but I totally failed to understand why it's regarded as one of the modern literaure myths...

Nevertheless, I picked my poly signature off it
:)

TCO
17-08-2007, 08:23:05
Catcher's over-rated. RED SKY AT MORNING is way better.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
17-08-2007, 08:35:57
I liked Catcher in the Rye, until I read L'╔tranger.

MDA
17-08-2007, 11:50:34
staring at the sea, staring at the sand...

Killing of an Arab!

TCO
17-08-2007, 13:28:10
How can you like something until you read something else? Don't you like it with your gut, your heart? Would those turn so quickly? Or is it some sort of intellectual decision along the lines of "I'm supposed to like this"?

Drekkus
17-08-2007, 13:46:46
My stomach can turn pretty quickly

Lazarus and the Gimp
17-08-2007, 19:23:40
"Pride and Prejudice"- abridged.


"Oooooh, I'm so insightful and free-spirited that I can gently mock the chattel status of women in marriage. Wow. You're rich! Let's get married!"

KrazyHorse
17-08-2007, 22:06:57
Originally posted by TCO
So, how come you are all wet for Holden Caulfield, I mean Asher, I mean Holden Caulfield? ;)

Actually Austen is a hell of a lot better than Salinger. Catcher is just over-rated trifle. Austen's stuff has insight enought to be worth spending time on. To be annoyed for the implicit sexual insult to men.

I hate Catcher too. :)

TCO
18-08-2007, 02:25:32
That's about it Trap. But da wimmin dig dat shit.

I know how to tweak ya, Kitty.

Funko
20-08-2007, 09:13:54
Originally posted by TCO
How can you like something until you read something else? Don't you like it with your gut, your heart? Would those turn so quickly? Or is it some sort of intellectual decision along the lines of "I'm supposed to like this"?

You can read something and be impressed but then read something so much better that it makes you re-evaluate your initial impression of the first book.

Or read something and think it's brilliantly innovative but then read an older book and find out that the one you liked before is just a poor quality knock off.

King_Ghidra
20-08-2007, 09:34:15
that is certainly also true outside literature

i remember thinking eddie murphy and chris rock were so funny and innovative until i heard richard pryor's stand-up

and by the by, i'm with laz on austen, twain and catcher in the rye.

Funko
20-08-2007, 09:35:31
Absolutely.

C.G.B. Spender
20-08-2007, 10:01:56
I liked Wittgenstein's Traktatus until I read the Hobbit.

MoSe
20-08-2007, 11:53:26
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
"the chattel status of women in marriage."

lol, at first I thought you could have mispelled cattle, then I looked up the word and found out it does indeed come from there, thru French
:lol:

Immortal Wombat
20-08-2007, 20:45:45
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Bullshit. In "Catcher in the rye" Salinger captured adolescent angst with clinical accuracy. Pfft. Poly captures adolescent angst; that doesn't mean it's shining example of modern literature.

C.G.B. Spender
21-08-2007, 07:54:00
Yeah, and it has no orcs or elves!

Lazarus and the Gimp
24-08-2007, 14:30:16
Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
Pfft. Poly captures adolescent angst; that doesn't mean it's shining example of modern literature.

Poly does it accidentally, and doesn't leave one feeling remotely sympathetic to its plight.

TCO
25-08-2007, 20:48:36
I feel no sympathy from reading Catcher. I want to take a steaming dump on the protagonist. I'm not alone. There is a sizable minority (majority?) of Catcher readers who react the same way.

Shining1
27-08-2007, 07:44:54
Poly does it accidentally, and doesn't leave one feeling remotely sympathetic to its plight.

lol!

TCO
28-08-2007, 22:48:55
Red sky at morning. read it. you pretentious fucks.

Lazarus and the Gimp
30-08-2007, 08:14:08
Red sky at night- shepherd's delight.

Red sky at morning- shepherd's warning.

Minced lamb and potatoes- shepherd's pie.