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Funko
13-08-2007, 13:06:15
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/staffordshire/6943847.stm

So this girl finds that a porn company has downloaded a photo of her aged 14 and was using it as the cover of one of their DVDs. She's sueing them. Fair enough.

The reaction of the company?

She said she had e-mailed TVX and was told that her photo was "to blame" for the DVD's poor sales.

:lol: Unbelievable response.

Venom
13-08-2007, 13:08:19
Damn misleading thread title. I was all ready to wank.

Chris
13-08-2007, 13:08:51
That will show her!

King_Ghidra
13-08-2007, 13:13:22
:lol: that is awesome.

C.G.B. Spender
13-08-2007, 13:39:07
That's quite a professional company

Drekkus
13-08-2007, 13:49:13
TVX should sue her for such a crappy pic

C.G.B. Spender
13-08-2007, 14:12:27
Or edit that picture (breastomizer!)

MDA
13-08-2007, 14:31:03
:lol: priceless response

Koshko
13-08-2007, 20:57:02
I hoping for another Traci Lords.

VetLegion-
13-08-2007, 21:22:40
:lol:

Anyway, reading that BBC article I noticed that many of their opening quote marks (") don't have matching closing quote marks. Is this common? Why do they do that?

Scabrous Birdseed
13-08-2007, 21:52:46
Own goal. To indicate the quote continues on the next line.

Greg W
14-08-2007, 01:39:41
:lol: I shouldn't be surprised by the stupidity of some people. But I constantly am.

King_Ghidra
14-08-2007, 08:33:42
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Own goal. To indicate the quote continues on the next line.

that's bizarre, i didn't even notice. is that a common convention?

C.G.B. Spender
14-08-2007, 08:38:38
In most cases, quotations that span multiple paragraphs should be block-quoted, and thus do not require quotation marks. Quotation marks are used for multiple-paragraph quotations in some cases, especially in narratives. The convention in English is to give the first and each subsequent paragraph opening quotes, using closing quotes only for the final paragraph of the quotation. The Spanish convention, though similar, uses closing quotes at the beginning of all subsequent paragraphs beyond the first.

mr_B
14-08-2007, 14:54:26
:lol: best response evah!!!

alsieboo
14-08-2007, 15:12:00
Priceless

Funko
14-08-2007, 15:15:57
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
that's bizarre, i didn't even notice. is that a common convention?

Yes, although I think it's weird.

MoSe
14-08-2007, 15:28:37
Quote Closed!

VetLegion-
14-08-2007, 19:14:29
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
In most cases, quotations that span multiple paragraphs should be block-quoted, and thus do not require quotation marks. Quotation marks are used for multiple-paragraph quotations in some cases, especially in narratives. The convention in English is to give the first and each subsequent paragraph opening quotes, using closing quotes only for the final paragraph of the quotation.

Thanks for the info, I had no idea.

KrazyHorse
15-08-2007, 05:04:46
Originally posted by Funko
Yes, although I think it's weird.

It's to distinguish between different voices in a dialogue.

When the quote closes it implies that a different person is to begin speaking.

Drekkus
15-08-2007, 07:22:13
Ok, now we went from teenage pron to quation marks semantics. You people are SICK!!!!!

Tizzy
15-08-2007, 08:22:17
Only on CG :lol:

Funko
15-08-2007, 08:28:38
Originally posted by KrazyHorse
It's to distinguish between different voices in a dialogue.

When the quote closes it implies that a different person is to begin speaking.

That doesn't explain having multiple opening quotes though does it?

King_Ghidra
15-08-2007, 08:52:38
The journalistic style on that article, whereby seemingly each sentence is a separate paragraph, is really to blame here.

Funko
15-08-2007, 09:00:25
Yeah, that seems to be the standard on BBC websites but I think it actually makes things more difficult to read because it disrupts the flow. Especially when someone is talking.

Scabrous Birdseed
15-08-2007, 09:05:21
It's fairly standard on most websites and in tabloid newspapers. It's not about trying to make it easier to read as such (although single sentence paragraphs tends to mean shorter trains of thought) but about keeping the appearance light, not heavy with text.

Some newspapers and magazines will have three or four times longer paragraphs, but that's a signal that the reading is going to be harder.

C.G.B. Spender
15-08-2007, 09:16:18
Huh? Summary?

MDA
15-08-2007, 10:38:41
""newspeople ride the short train of thought

KrazyHorse
15-08-2007, 18:03:54
Originally posted by Funko
That doesn't explain having multiple opening quotes though does it?

It's not necessary, but it does tend to remind you that you're still in a quote.

MoSe
17-08-2007, 07:05:06
I'd think they'd be nested quotes, rather....

whe have a kids tale/joke going more or less like that

http://www.filastrocche.it/nostalgici/filastro/cera2.htm


Once upon a time
there was a king
sitting on his sofa
he commanded his page
to tell him a tale
and thus the page began:

Once upon a time
there was a king
sitting on his sofa
he commanded his page
to tell him a tale
and thus the page began:

Once upon a time
there was a king
sitting on his sofa
he commanded his page
to tell him a tale
and thus the page began:

Once upon a time
there was a king
sitting on his sofa
he commanded his page
to tell him a tale
and thus the page began:

......

MoSe
17-08-2007, 07:07:04
curious, vB must have a 3 level quote nesting limit!
:lol: