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View Full Version : "Describe the city you live in" ... Urgh!


mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:00:43
mine is in the dutch mountains.

Funko
10-07-2007, 09:02:26
Someone on Facebook said of my Pirates in Rotterdam photos "my brother lives in Rotterdam, it's a shithole"

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:02:30
come on don't be hush hush shy ow why

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:03:28
Originally posted by Funko
Someone on Facebook said of my Pirates in Rotterdam photos "my brother lives in Rotterdam, it's a shithole" I'm not your brother Pete

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:06:17
Hamburg is the second largest city in Germany and with Hamburg Harbour, its principal port, Hamburg is also the second largest port city in Europe, no. 9 in the world-ranking of ports and the largest city in the European Union which is not a national capital. A large part of the port is a fenced-in duty-free area.

The official name Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg (German: Freie und Hansestadt Hamburg; Low German: Free un Hansestadt Hamborg) refers to Hamburg's membership in the medieval Hanseatic League and the fact that Hamburg is a City State and one of the sixteen Federal States of Germany.

Hamburg is situated on the southern tip of Jutland Peninsula, geographically centered (a) between Continental Europe and Scandinavia and (b) between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. The city of Hamburg lies at the junction of the river Elbe with the rivers Alster and Bille and the city center is set around two lakes, the Binnenalster ("Inner Alster") and the Aussenalster ("Outer Alster").

Hamburg is an international trade city and the commercial and cultural centre of Northern Germany.

The skyline of Hamburg features the high spires of the five principal churches (Hauptkirchen) covered with green copper plates.

* St. Michaeliskirche (Saint Michael’s Church, nicknamed “Michel)
* St. Nikolaikirche (Saint Nicholas' Church, memorial)
* St. Petrikirche (Saint Peter’s Church, 11th century)
* St. Jakobikirche (Saint Jacob’s Church, 13th century)
* St. Katharinenkirche (Saint Catherine’s Church, 14th century)

Hamburg has a number of prominent buildings from the past and present. The many canals in Hamburg are crossed by over 2300 bridges — more than Amsterdam (1200) and Venice (400) combined.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:10:00
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/07/Arms_Rotterdam.jpg

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:11:29
For the destruction of the city center in 1940, see Bombing of Rotterdam

Rotterdam, by Johan Barthold Jongkind (1856)
Rotterdam, by Johan Barthold Jongkind (1856)

Settlement at the lower end of the fen stream Rotte (or Rotta, as it was then known, from rot “muddy” + a “water”, thus “muddy water”) dates from at least 900. Around 1150, large floods in the area ended development, leading to the construction of protective dikes and dams, including Schielands Hoge Zeedijk (“Schieland’s High Sea Dike”) along the northern banks of the present-day Nieuwe Maas. A dam was built in the 1260s or 1270s to prevent high water and storm tides from flooding the land through the Rotte’s course. This dam at the Rotte, or “Rotterdam”, was located at the present-day Hoogstraat (“High Street”).

On June 7, 1340, Count Willem IV of Holland granted city rights to Rotterdam, which then had an approximate 2,000 inhabitants. Around 1350, the Rotterdamse Schie was completed, a shipping canal which provided Rotterdam access to the larger towns in the north, allowing it to become a local transshipment center between Holland, England and Germany, and to slowly urbanize.

The port of Rotterdam slowly but steadily grew into a port of importance, becoming the seat of one of the six chambers of the Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC), or the Dutch East India Company.

The greatest spurt of growth, both in port activity and population, followed after the already mentioned completion of the Nieuwe Waterweg in 1872. The city and harbor started to expand on the South bank of the river. Delivering evidence of its rapid growth and success is the skyscraper in the French Chateau style, the White House, or Witte Huis, built in the American spirit of office buildings in 1898; its height is 45 m, it was at the time of completion the tallest office building in Europe.

The German army invaded the Netherlands on May 10, 1940. It had planned only one day for this conquest, but it forced the Dutch army to capitulate on May 14, 1940 with the Bombing of Rotterdam by the German Luftwaffe, and threats to bomb other cities. The heart of the city was almost completely destroyed, 800 people were killed, about 80,000 others were made homeless. Ossip Zadkine later captured the event strikingly with his statue Stad zonder hart (City without a heart). The statue is now located near the Leuvehaven, not far from the Erasmusbrug in the north of the city. From the 1950s through the 1970s, the city was rebuilt. It remained quite windy and open until the city councils from the 1980s on began developing an active architectural policy. Daring and new styles of apartments, office buildings and recreation facilities resulted in a more 'livable' city center with a new skyline. In the 1990s, a new business center on the south bank of the river, the Kop van Zuid has been built. The City Hall survived the bombing campaign.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:12:00
we are the city of Muddy Waters :bounce:

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:13:51
Although Hamburg is jokingly said to be the birthplace of the Hamburger, this might just be a myth. However, the beef patties a German immigrant from Hamburg sold in the 1850s in New York allegedly were named after the butcher and then became a generic term, so the myth goes.

Original Hamburg dishes are Bohnen, Birnen und Speck (Low Saxon Bohn, Peern un Speck, green runner beans cooked with pears and bacon), Aalsuppe (Low Saxon Oolsupp, often mistaken to be German for "eel soup" (Aal/Ool ‘eel’), however the name probably comes from the Low Saxon allns [ʔaˑlns], meaning “all”, “everything and the kitchen sink”, not necessarily eel. Today eel is often included to meet the expectations of unsuspecting diners.), Bratkartoffeln (Low Saxon Brootkartüffeln, pan-fried potato slices), Finkenwerder Scholle (Low Saxon Finkwarder Scholl, pan-fried plaice), Pannfisch (pan-fried fish), Rote Grütze (Low Saxon Rode Grütt, related to Danish rødgrød, a type of summer pudding made mostly from berries and usually served with cream, like Danish rødgrød med fløde) and Labskaus (a mixture of corned beef, mashed potatoes and beetroot, a cousin of the Norwegian lapskaus and Liverpool's lobscouse, all offshoots off an old-time one-pot meal that used to be the main component of the common sailor’s humdrum diet on the high seas).

Hamburg is the birthplace of Alsterwasser (a reference to the city’s river Alster with two lake-like bodies in the city centre thanks to damming), a type of shandy, a concoction of equal parts of beer and carbonated lemonade (Zitronenlimonade), the lemonade being added to the beer. Hamburg is also home to a curious regional pastry called Franzbrötchen. Looking rather like a flattened croissant, the Franzbrötchen is somewhat similar in preparation but includes a cinnamon and sugar filling, often with raisins or brown sugar streusel. The name may also reflect to the roll's croissant-like appearance -- franz appears to be a shortening of französisch, meaning "French," which would make a Franzbrötchen a “French roll.” Being a Hamburg regional food, the Franzbrötchen becomes quite scarce outside the borders of the city; as near as Lunenburg (Lüneburg) it can only be found as a Hamburger and is not to be had in Bremen at all.

Ordinary bread rolls—without which a leisurely weekend breakfast in Hamburg is unimaginable—tend to be oval-shaped and of the French bread variety. The local name is Rundstück (“round piece” rather than mainstream German Brötchen, diminutive form of Brot “bread”), a relative of Denmark’s rundstykke. In fact, while by no means identical, the cuisines of Hamburg and Denmark, especially of Copenhagen have a lot in common. This also includes a predilection for open-faced sandwiches of all sorts, especially topped with cold-smoked or pickled fish. The American hamburger seems to have developed from Hamburg’s Frikadelle (or Frikandelle): a pan-fried patty (usually larger and thicker than the American counterpart) made from a mixture of ground beef, soaked stale bread, egg, chopped onion, salt and pepper, usually served with potatoes and vegetables like any other piece of meat, not usually on a bun. (Many Hamburgers consider their Frikadelle and the American hamburger different, virtually unrelated “creatures.”)

MOBIUS
10-07-2007, 09:14:55
Originally posted by mr_B
we are the city of Muddy Waters :bounce:

One of my favourite capital names is 'Kuala Lumpur', I always though it was very evocative of South East Asia...

It means 'Muddy Confluence'.:gasmaske:

King_Ghidra
10-07-2007, 09:15:01
I don't live in a city

zmama
10-07-2007, 09:15:11
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
Hamburg is *snip lots of irrelevant stuff*

Denmark or France

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:15:55
During World War II Hamburg suffered a series of devastating air raids which killed 42,000 German civilians (Bombing of Hamburg in World War II). Through this, and the new zoning guidelines of the 1960s, the inner city lost much of its architectural past.


YAY! WE BEAT ROTTERDAM!

maroule
10-07-2007, 09:17:19
Paris is the capital city of France. It is situated on the River Seine, in northern France, at the heart of the Île-de-France region ("Région parisienne"). Paris has an estimated population of 2,153,600 within city limit (2005 est.).[2] The Paris urban area has a population of 9.93 million [3] and a commuter belt around the same completes the Paris "aire urbaine" (roughly: "metropolitan area") that, with its population of 12 million,[4] is one of the most populated areas of its kind in Europe.[5] It is also regarded as one of the major global cities, along with London, New York and Tokyo.[6][7][8]

Paris's location at a crossroads between land and river trade routes in lands of abundant agriculture had made it one of the principal cities of France by the 10th century, rich with royal palaces, wealthy abbeys and a cathedral; by the 12th century Paris had become one of Europe's foremost centres of learning and the arts. Today, Paris is a major influence in politics, fashion, business, arts and science. The city serves as an important hub of intercontinental transportation and is home to universities, sport events, opera companies and museums of international renown,[9][10] making it the most popular tourist destination in the world with over 30 million foreign visitors per year.[11]

The Paris region (Île-de-France) is France's foremost centre of economic activity. With €478.7 billion (US$595.3 billion), it produced more than a quarter of the gross domestic product (GDP) of France in 2005. With La Défense, the largest purpose-built business district in Europe, it hosts the head offices of almost half of the major French companies, as well as the headquarters of ten of the world's 100 largest companies.[12] Paris also hosts many international organizations such as UNESCO, the OECD, the ICC, or the informal Paris Club.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:18:21
Architecture and skyline
Modern residential architecture (cube houses) in downtown Rotterdam
Modern residential architecture (cube houses) in downtown Rotterdam

In 1898, the 45 meter high-rise office building, the White House, was completed, at that time the tallest office building in Europe.

In the first decades of the 20th century, some influential architecture in the modern style was built in Rotterdam. Notable are the Van Nelle fabriek (1929) a monument of modern factory design by Brinkman en Van der Vlugt, the Jugenstil clubhouse of the Royal Maas Yacht Club designed by Hooijkaas jr. en Brinkman (1909), and Feyenoord's football stadium de Kuip (1936) also by Brinkman en Van der Vlugt. The architect J. J. P. Oud was a famous Rotterdammer in those days. During the early stages of World War II the center of Rotterdam was bombed by the Germans, destroying much of the older buildings in the center of the city. After initial crisis re-construction the center of Rotterdam has become the site of ambitious new architecture.

Rotterdam is also famous for its Kubuswoningen or cube houses built by architect Piet Blom in 1984. In addition to that there are many international well known architects based in Rotterdam like O.M.A (Rem Koolhaas), MVRDV and Neutelings & Riedijk to name a few.
The Erasmus Bridge
The Erasmus Bridge
The Euromast
The Euromast

Rotterdam houses several of the tallest structures in the Netherlands.

* The Erasmus Bridge (1996) is a 2,600-foot cable stayed bridge linking the north and south of Rotterdam. It is held up by a 138 meters (453 ft) tall pylon with a characteristic bend, earning the bridge its nickname "De Zwaan" ("the Swan").
* Rotterdam has the tallest residential building in the Netherlands: the Montevideo Tower.
* Rotterdam is also home to the tallest office building Delftse Poort which houses Nationale Nederlanden insurance company, part of ING Group. [1], [2]
* The city also houses the 186 meters (610 ft) tall Euromast ("Euro Mast"), which has long been a major tourist attraction. It was built in 1960, initially reaching a height of 101 meters (331 ft); in 1970, the Euromast was extended by 85 meters (279 ft) to its current height.

Rotterdam has a reputation in being a platform for the architectural discourse and education; the Berlage Institute a postgraduate laboratory of architecture, and the NAi (Netherlands Architecture Institute), which is open to the public and has various and very good exhibitions on architecture and urban planning issues.

Rotterdam is standing in the best European SkylineTop together with Frankfurt, Warsaw and Paris. More highrise projects are started in this city. (overview tower development in Rotterdam)

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:18:58
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
During World War II Hamburg suffered a series of devastating air raids which killed 42,000 German civilians (Bombing of Hamburg in World War II). Through this, and the new zoning guidelines of the 1960s, the inner city lost much of its architectural past.


YAY! WE BEAT ROTTERDAM! :cry:

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:19:43
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
I don't live in a city Reading pronounced Redding?

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:20:04
The city is first documented in the year 792, though as early as 740 a settlement called Villa Suinfurde is mentioned. In the 10th century Schweinfurt was the seat of a margravate.

In the first half of 13th century Schweinfurt was expanded to a real city with city wall, towers and city gates . At that time the Nikolaus hospital was founded, a mint was established and construction work on the Saint Johannis church began.

Around 1250 Schweinfurt was totally destroyed during a feud between the Earl of Henneberg and the Prince-Bishop of Würzburg. In the following years it was reconstructed. A document from 1282 signed by King Rudolf I of Habsburg states that Schweinfurt was a free city within the Holy Roman Empire. Since then the coat of arms of Schweinfurt has borne the imperial eagle. In 1309 the city was given to the Count of Henneberg, but in the 1360s the city regained its independence and joined the Swabian-Franconian Confederation. In 1397 King Wenzel entitled the town to utilize the river Main, and in 1436-1437 Schweinfurt acquired the village of Oberndorf, as well as the Teutonic Order Fort on the Peterstirn and a small piece of land-including the villages of Zell and Weipoltshausen. Some year later there was the first uprising of Schweinfurt's people against the Town-council, followed by a second one in 1513-1514. This time the issuing of a constitution was allowed.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:20:58
Sinds de Tweede Wereldoorlog is Córdoba een belangrijk industrieel centrum. De belangrijkste industrieën zijn de productie van auto's (Renault, Volkswagen en Fiat), spoorwegindustie (Materfer) en luchtvaartindustrie (Fábrica Militar de Aviones. Tevens is er een aanzienlijke textiel- en chemische industire.

Córdoba wordt alom gezien als het technologische centrum van Argentinië. Het Argentijnse Centro Espacial Teófilo Tabanera produceert en bestuurt sattelieten. Ook de softwarebedrijven (Motorola, Vates, Intel en Electronic Data Systems) zijn er gevestigd.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:21:00
:lol:

mr_B
10-07-2007, 09:24:06
Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. It is located at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet, midway between London and Swindon off the M4 motorway. The name Reading is pronounced to rhyme with bedding (in IPA /ˈrɛdɪŋ/).

Reading was an important centre in the medieval period, as the site of an important monastery with strong royal connections, but suffered serious economic damage during the 17th century from which it took a long time to recover. Today it is again an important commercial centre, with strong links to information technology and insurance. It is also a university town, with two universities and a large student population.

Location

Reading is located some 66 km (41 miles) due west of central London, 48 km (30 miles) southeast of Oxford and 64 km (40 miles) east of Swindon. The centre of Reading is on a low ridge between the Rivers Thames and Kennet close to their confluence, reflecting the town's history as a river port. Just before the confluence, the Kennet cuts through a narrow steep-sided gap in the hills forming the southern flank of the Thames flood plain. The absence of a floodplain on the Kennet in this defile enabled the development of wharves.

As Reading has grown, its suburbs have spread in three directions:

* to the west between the two rivers into the foothills of the Berkshire Downs,
* to the south and south-east on the south side of the Kennet, and
* to the north of the Thames into the Chiltern Hills.

However outside the central area, the floors of the valley containing the two rivers remain largely unimproved floodplain, subject to occasional flooding. Apart from one road across the Kennet floodplain, and the M4 looping to the south, the only routes between the three built-up areas are in the central area, creating road congestion there.

Reading has its own subregional catchment area, incorporating the towns of Wokingham, Bracknell and Twyford, plus large villages such as Pangbourne, Theale, Winnersh, Burghfield and Shiplake.

Definition

It should be noted that, depending on the definition adopted, neither the town nor the urban area are necessarily co-terminous with the borough.

Thus, the borough has a population of 144,000 in an area of 40.40 km², whilst the Office for National Statistics' definition of the urban area of Reading is significantly larger at 232,662 people in an area of 55.35 km². This latter area – sometimes referred to as Greater Reading – incorporates the town's eastern and western suburbs outside the borough, in the civil parishes of Earley, Woodley, Purley-on-Thames and Tilehurst (see below for further details). This urban area is itself a component of the Reading/Wokingham Urban Area. Reading is the 17th largest settlement in England, based on the population of the urban area.[1][2]

Historically, the town of Reading was smaller than the current borough, and has had several definitions over the years. Such definitions include the old ecclesiastical parishes of Reading St Mary, St Laurence and St Giles, or the even smaller pre-19th century borough.[3]

[edit] Suburbs

Reading has a number of suburbs, both within the borough itself and within the surrounding urban area. The names and location of these suburbs are in general usage but, except where some of the outer suburbs correspond to civil parishes, there are no formally defined boundaries. The borough itself is unparished, and the wards used to elect the borough councillors generally ignore the accepted suburbs and use invented ward names.

The suburbs include:

* Calcot, Caversham, Caversham Heights, Caversham Park Village, Coley, Coley Park
* Earley, Emmer Green
* Fords Farm
* Horncastle
* Katesgrove
* Little Heath, Lower Caversham, Lower Earley
* Maiden Erlegh
* Newtown
* Purley-On-Thames
* Southcote
* Tilehurst
* Whitley, Whitley Wood, Woodley


History
St Mary's Church and market
St Mary's Church and market
The Maiwand lion in Forbury Gardens — an unofficial symbol of Reading
The Maiwand lion in Forbury Gardens — an unofficial symbol of Reading

The settlement was founded at the confluence of the River Thames and River Kennet in the eighth century as Readingum. The name is probably from the Anglo-Saxon for "(Place of) Readda's People", or (less probably) the Celtic Rhydd-Inge, "Ford over the River". It was occupied by the Vikings after the Battle of Reading (871), but had recovered sufficiently by its 1086 Domesday Book listing to contain around 600 people and be made a designated borough. The town was a place of pilgrimage in medieval times to Reading Abbey. In 1253 Reading's Merchant Guild successfully petitioned for the grant of a charter from the King and negotiated a division of authority with the Abbey. The dissolution of the Abbey saw Henry VIII grant the Guild a new charter in 1542 with which to become a borough corporation to run the town.

By the end of the 16th century Reading was the largest town in Berkshire, home to over 3,000 people. During the Medieval period and Tudor times Reading grew rich on its trade in cloth, as instanced by the fortune made by local merchant John Kendrick. The town played an important role during the English Civil War; it changed hands a number of times. Despite its fortifications, it had a Royalist garrison imposed on it in 1642. The subsequent siege by the Parliamentary forces succeeded in April 1643. However the taxes levied on the town by the garrison badly damaged its cloth trade, and it did not recover. Reading was also the only site of significant fighting in England during the Revolution of 1688 with the Battle of Reading.

The 18th century saw the beginning of a major iron works in the town and the growth of the brewing trade for which Reading was to become famous. Agricultural products from the surrounding area still used Reading as a market place, especially at the famous Reading cheese fair but now trade was coming in from a wider area. Reading's trade benefited from better designed turnpike roads which helped its establish its location on the major coaching routes from London to Oxford and the west country. It also gained from increasing river traffic on both the Thames and Kennet. In 1723 despite considerable local opposition the Kennet Navigation opened the River to boats as far as Newbury. This opposition stopped when it became apparent the new route benefited the town. The opening of the Kennet and Avon Canal in 1810 made it possible to go by barge from Reading to the Bristol Channel.

In 1801, the population of Reading was about 9,400. During the 19th century, Reading grew rapidly as a manufacturing centre. Reading maintained its representation by two Members of Parliament with the Reform Act 1832, and the borough was one of the ones reformed as a municipal borough by the Municipal Corporations Act 1835. In 1836 the Reading Borough Police were founded. The Great Western Railway arrived in 1841, followed by the South Eastern Railway, in 1849, and the London and South Western Railway, in 1856. The Reading Establishment, an early commercial photographic studio, operated in Reading from 1844 to 1847 and was managed by Nicholaas Henneman, a Dutchman and former valet of William Henry Fox Talbot (a pioneer of photography).[4] Many of the images for The Pencil of Nature by Fox Talbot, the first book to be illustrated with photographic prints, were printed in Reading.

In 1851 the population was 21,500. The town became the County Town (superseding Abingdon[5]) in 1867 and became a county borough under the Local Government Act 1888. By 1900, the population was 59,000 — large sections of the housing in Reading are terraced, reflecting its 19th century growth. The town has been famous for the "Three Bs" of beer (from 1785 dominated by the Simonds' Brewery - India Pale Ale was invented in Reading), bulbs (1807–1976, Suttons Seeds), and biscuits (1822–1977, Huntley & Palmers). In the 19th century the town also made 'Reading Sauce', described as a sharp sauce flavoured with onions, spices, and herbs, very like Worcestershire Sauce.

The town continued to expand in the 20th century, annexing Caversham across the River Thames in Oxfordshire in 1911. This expansion can be seen in the number of 1920s built semi-detached properties, and the 1950s expansion that joined Woodley, Earley and Tilehurst into Reading. Miles Aircraft in Woodley was an important local firm from the 1930s to 1950s. The Lower Earley development, started in the 1970s, was the largest private housing development in Europe. This extended the urban area of Reading up to the M4 motorway, which acts as the southern boundary to the town. Further housing developments have increased the number of modern commuter houses in the surrounding parts of Reading, and 'out-of-town' shopping hypermarkets.

The local shopping centre, The Oracle, built in 1999, is named after the 17th century workhouse founded by John Kendrick which previously occupied the site. The original 'Oracle' gates can be seen in the Museum of Reading in the town hall. It provides 3 storeys of shopping and boosted the local economy by providing 4,000 jobs. Reading has also made itself more appealing to tourists by pedestrianising Broad street

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:24:13
Bazelo (germane Basel, france Bâle, hispane/itale/romanĉe Basilea) estas la trie granda urbo de Svislando, post Zuriko kaj Ĝenevo. Ĝi havas 160 000 enloĝantojn kaj formigas kun la civitoj Riehen kaj Bettingen la duon-kantono Bazelo Urba, ties ĉefurbo ĝi estas. Bazelo situas ĉe la rivero Rejno, proksime de la landa triangulo kun Francio kaj Germanio kaj dividas sian flughavenon kun la franca urbo Mulhaŭzo.

Bazelo famas pro sia Karnavalo, kaj malpli agrable pro sia ĥemia industrio.

La urba emblemo estas la bazilisko.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:25:39
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/2e/Gothammap.jpg

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 09:28:26
Think of London, a small city
It's dark, dark in the daytime
The people sleep, sleep in the daytime
If they want to, if they want to
There are a lot of rich people in Birmingham
A lot of ghosts in a lot of houses
Look over there!...A dry ice factory
A good place to get some thinking done
Down el Paso way things get pretty spread out
People got no idea where in the world they are
They go up north and come back south
Still got no idea where in the world they are.
Did I forget to mention, to mention Memphis
Home of Elvis and the ancient greeks
Do I smell? I smell home cooking
It's only the river, it's only the river.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
10-07-2007, 10:37:46
Mozart

Venom
10-07-2007, 11:53:34
My city is definitely a shithole.

Colon
10-07-2007, 11:54:46
ANTWERP

Antwerp, daughter of the River Scheldt and second largest city of Belgium.. The 500.000 inhabitants call it the 'Metropolis' (Antwerpians are known in Belgium for not being too modest). This city has so many different facets that it takes a while before one gets to know it thoroughly.

It is the second largest harbor of Europe (after Rotterdam). Moreover, Antwerp is a splendid city with numerous architectural highlights, most of which date from the 16th (the golden era of Antwerp) and the 17th century. The destructions of the Second World War, unfortunately, has scarred somehow the fair face of the old town. Still there are enough monuments left for those who like monument-hopping to spend a few days admiring them. The past is also represented by the numerous paintings of Peter Paul Rubens who lived in the Antwerp of the early 17th century.

Antwerp, the diamond center of the World. If diamonds really are a girl's best friend, than a lot of ladies will not leave out a visit to the diamond district around the Railway Station. This area is also the Jewish part of the city. The presence of many 'Chassidic' Jewish people gives the city a flair that cannot be found in other Belgian cities.

Antwerp, however, does not only live from the past. Nowadays, Antwerp has earned a place among the fashion cities of the world thanks to the efforts of numerous young Flemish fashion designers ( e.g.: Walter Van Beirendonck, Nadine Wynants, Ann De Meulemeester, Dirk Bikkembergs, Kaat Tilley and others). Visit the fashion area of Antwerp near the Meir shopping street.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 11:57:02
Is antwerp the opposite of prowerp?

Scabrous Birdseed
10-07-2007, 12:00:08
I'm indifferent on werp myself.

Colon
10-07-2007, 12:06:16
Antwerp is the real urban deal, a refreshingly down-to-earth yet vivacious cosmopolitan habitat blessed with sublime architecture, fashionable shop fronts, beer-washed olde-worlde pubs, awesome monuments, jazzed-up clubs, inspired artworks and restaurant tables piled with plates of superb multicultural food. The biggest city of Flanders, located in the northern part of Belgium, is no longer than 30 minutes away by car from Brussels. Its culture, history, vibrant nightlife and world class shopping are now within easy reach, thanks to excellent access by air, train, motorway and even water. Hourly high-speed trains connect the city with other European capitals like Paris, Amsterdam and London. Antwerp not only has a wealth of outstanding museums, picturesque galleries, sculpted streets and beautiful architecture, but is also laced with refreshing greenery and urban haunts. The city has been receiving increasing amounts of art loving visitors throughout the years: in 2004 for instance the focus was on its most important inhabitant: Rubens, visionary and master of Flemish Baroque art. Rubens lived and worked in Antwerp during the city's Golden Age and left a big legacy from which over 50 works are now permanently on display. A lot of the pieces can be found in several of the landmarks, but the work of the artist isn't confined to them. So if you prefer your art out in the open you can copy the artist's footsteps by taking a walking tour that shows you his masterpieces dotted around the city. The city has an exuberant shopping scene in which happy consumers are continually tempted by new-season fashions, luxury shops, antique-obsessed galleries and stylish accessories from artful manufacturers. In 2001 the huge fashion event 'Landed-Geland' attracted fashionistas from all over the world and put Antwerp at the top list of fashion capitals. Certainly you'll never be bored when shopping here, you'll find the pick of boutiques, cutting edge contemporary art and sharp design. The shopping streets are mainly found in the cultural and historical interesting neighborhoods, most of them are pedestrian and within walking distance. Several shops are even located in historical buildings, so there's always something stunning to admire, whether it's fashion or architecture. The classy northern end of Meir, fashion-conscious Nationalestraat or trendy Kammenstraat, the choice is up to you! To the east of the historical heart of the city, just a few steps away from the Central Station, you'll find the Wall Street of diamonds. Being the World Diamond Center, Antwerp trades up to 80% of the world's production ... no wonder the quality is brilliant, prices dazzling and customer service stunning. And Antwerp being a fashion and design city, of course you'll also find an impressive range of contemporary jewelry here. Having the second biggest international port in Europe, Antwerp keeps up a leading position in the world. Crossing from right to left bank by taking the tunnel,your options are to walk or cycle through it, or simply enjoy a relaxing river cruise -a good chance to admire the famous skyline with ancient towers- or have a look at the two ports: the trading harbor with big ships or the marinas with the fanciest boats. Conclusion: Antwerp is hip, its diamonds are cool, its nightlife is hot, its innovative fashion is ultra-bold and its beer is served ice-cold. Whatever your tastes, Antwerp won't leave you disappointed!

zmama
10-07-2007, 12:20:24
Pittsburgh (pronounced [ˈpɪts.bɚg]) is the second largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It is the county seat of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Built on land between the confluence of the Allegheny, Ohio and Monongahela rivers and the surrounding hills, Pittsburgh features a skyline of 151 skyscrapers,[1] 446 bridges[2], two inclines and a pre-revolutionary fortification. Residents of the city are called Pittsburghers. The downtown is a compact and walkable area located on the triangular land at the confluence of the rivers.

Pittsburgh was fueled by the manufacturing industry until the 1980s when the United States steel industry collapsed. The city's economy is now largely based on healthcare, education, technology and financial services.[3] Robotics, in particular, is a major sector of the local economy. The Wall Street Journal dubbed the city "Roboburgh."

Despite a declining population,[4] Pittsburgh remains the principal cultural and economic influence in the eastern Ohio River Valley. Because of its low cost of living, economic opportunities, education, transportation and medical infrastructures, Pittsburgh is consistently ranked high in livability surveys. In 2007 Pittsburgh was named "America's Most Livable City" by Places Rated Almanac.

MattHiggs
10-07-2007, 12:54:17
Salford

Salford's biggest claim to fame, of course, is being the birthplace of the highly overrated artist L. S. Lowry, immortalized in song for drawing "Matchstick men and matchstick cats and dogs". Of course if he were alive today, Mr Lowry would have plenty of Matchstick Chavs to draw, as very few of the younger members of Salford society are under 6 feet tall and they're all skinny as rakes. This is in no small part due to their diet which consists almost entirely of Burger King and MacDonalds burgers, leaving them malnurished and overgrown thanks to their massive injestion of bovine growth hormone.

Mr. Lowry wouldn't get much painting done today however, because within 5 minutes of setting his easel up some chav schoolkid who couldn't be arsed showing up at one of the local low-security prisons that are euphamistically referred to as "schools" will have turned up trying to bum a fag. If no tabacco is forthcoming then the little freak would have no doubt set fire to the poor sod's canvas, saving the art world from another one of his dire little scrawlings but doing nothing for his need to express himself creatively. Indeed, creativity is something that is slapped down at every opportunity by the locals, as is such outlandish notions as having a work-ethic or not wanting to stink like a filthy pesant who hasn't bathed in a month.

Charles Darwin would have had a field day here, as Salford not merely proves the theory of evolution but actually allows a casual observer to witness the process in reverse. The long arms with their dragging knuckles, low sloping foreheads and incoherant grunts that seem to be some kind of language are truely something to behold. In another hundred years, the good people of Salford will have lost their opposable thumbs (which will b a blo c0s u n33d 1 2 txt ur m8s) and will be swinging from the lamp posts by their newly-acquired prehensile tails. Again, the bovine growth hormone may be a factor here, as may the vast carbon monoxide cloud that clings to the city like the rain cloud that is permanently overhead drizzling a miserable cold half-arsed kind of rain down on the place seemingly almost constantly.

The Salford Shoplifting City, a nasty little precinct that serves as the hub of what we'll call, for want of a better term, Salford society, truely is Chav Mecca, as has been pointed out already. There are buggies every 20 feet or so, filled with some pasty looking Chav baby in a little miniature tracky and adoreable little white trainers (Aww, he looks so grown up!) just waiting to mow you down as the little bastard's 14 year old mother pushes them along with no regard to their surroundings as they're too preoccupied txting away on their tacky cheap Pay As You Go mobile shoplifted from Woolworths. If you're lucky, you'll get an apoligy should you be nailed by one of these wheeled menaces, the traditional apoligy taking the form of "Oy, wot your fukin problem?" or "Oy, u fukin blind?" or something along those lines. Should you be foolish enough to wonder into the outdoor market area on a day when there is no market on, you run the risk of being accosted by filthy-looking sexually frustrated old men who aren't too concerned about your gender and will go for some hot tongue achun even if you also happen to be male (No, I'm not making this up, I actually did have this happen to me. I kicked the guy in the nuts and ran like fuck, but then again running like fuck is definately a skill that will serve you well in this hell hole).

If you know anything about fitting windows then you'll never be out of work in Salford, bricks seem to be gravationally defiant in this place and will come sailing through any window pane that is foolish enough to be on the ground floor of your dwelling. In fact, if you're a student and living in university accomodation, go for one of the high rise flats near the Shoplifting Centre, the higher the floor you're on the better. The lift may be always full or broken and you'll have a metric shitload of stairs to climb every day you're brave/dumb enough to wonder outside, but at least the flying debris wont get high enough to put your window through.

To sum up, Salford is quite possibly the worst place on the face of the planet outside of downtown Bhagdad. If someone decided to nuke this miserable little town I'd shake their hand for the service they'll be doing to the gene pool.

Mr. Bas
10-07-2007, 13:06:24
Sounds good. :beer:

Drekkus
10-07-2007, 13:12:17
So who is it? Is Hamburg or Antwerp the second biggest port?? Rotterdam is number 1, everyone knows that, but who is the mysterious number 2!!!

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:24:03
Hamburg are the pretenders!

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:25:55
I didn't realise my text said Antwerp was the number two port BTW.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:31:20
number 2

hihihi the first VERLIEZERS!!!!!

Drekkus
10-07-2007, 13:32:24
Vleuten is een dorp in de gemeente Utrecht, in de Nederlandse provincie Utrecht. Tot 2001 was het een zelfstandig dorp behorende bij de voormalige gemeente Vleuten-De Meern. Sindsdien is het een onderdeel van de gemeente Utrecht en is het ingedeeld bij de wijk Vleuten-De Meern. Het dorp heeft echter niet zijn volledige zelfstandigheid verloren, zoals plaatsnaamborden en postadressen. In 1999 had het dorp 7580 inwoners.

In de Romeinse tijd lag er een fort (castellum) met een aangrenzend kampdorp (vicus), langs de toenmalige rijksgrens, de (oude) Rijn. De naam is mogelijkerwijs Fletio(ne) zoals op de Peutinger kaart staat aangegeven. Ofschoon sommigen denken dat het een schrijffout is van Fectio, dat echter te Vechten bij de stad Utrecht ligt. De naam klinkt nog bijna hetzelfde als de huidige en een schrijffout voor het andere fort is niet waarschijnlijk.

In Vleuten zijn drie verschillende basisscholen, de Willibrordschool (katholiek), de Kees Valkensteinschool (openbaar) en de Torenpleinschool (protestants). Een middelbare school is in het dorp niet aanwezig, maar is wel dichtbij te vinden, bijvoorbeeld in Leidsche Rijn, Maarssenbroek, Woerden en natuurlijk nog een paar in Utrecht. In het dorp zijn niet veel winkels, 2 supermarkten, 2 drogisten, 2 slijters, 2 chinese restaurants (+ afhaal), 1 groenteman, 1 fietsenmaker, 2 slagers, 1 bakker, 1 doe het zelf winkel, 1 woonwinkel, 1 bruna, 1 postkantoor, 2 reisbureaus, 1 benzinestation, een paar kappers en veel tandartsen. Ook beschikt Vleuten over 2 banken.

Een paar wijken van Vleuten zijn: Het centrum, wijk Odenvelt, wijk Over het spoor, wijk Multatulie, De Tol, en de schilderswijk.

Het dorp heeft een treinstation op het spoortraject Utrecht-Den Haag, waarmee U in een paar minuten in Hoog Catharijne in Utrecht kunt zijn. Het station in Vleuten gaat in de toekomst echter zo'n 300 meter meer naar het westen verplaatst worden. Het voormalige gemeentehuis van de gemeente Vleuten-De Meern staat in Vleuten. Deze heeft sinds 2001 de functie van wijkbureau. Ten zuidwesten van het oude dorp, op de oude weg naar Harmelen, ligt de dertiende eeuwse toren, De Hamtoren. Ook erg dichtbij ligt het grootste kasteel van Nederland, Kasteel de Haar, waar vaak evenementen georganiseerd worden.

De nieuwbouwwijk Vleuterweide ten zuidwesten van het oude dorp, is onderdeel van het nieuwbouwproject Leidsche Rijn. Ten oosten van Vleuten ligt het Leidsche Rijn Park. Dit nieuwe stadspark moet als een buffer fungeren tussen Vleuten, inclusief Vleuterweide, en de wijk Leidsche Rijn. Ten noorden van het oude dorp ligt de zandafgraving de Haarrijnseplas.

Het dorp heeft tevens een Hervormde kerk, waarvan de toren uit omstreeks 1300 dateert. In de kerk hangt een orgel van de orgelbouwer Gideon Thomas Bätz. Dit orgel is gebouwd in 1809 voor de Remonstrantse Kerk van Utrecht en in 1860 verhuisd naar Vleuten.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:32:30
You idiots! Hamburg has the second largest port and Antwerp the second biggest port in Europe!

Fistandantilus
10-07-2007, 13:33:32
That's confusing.

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:33:44
It's more important to be the second biggest than it is to be the second largest though.

Fistandantilus
10-07-2007, 13:35:06
I thought it was just another way to avoid the third place??

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:35:15
what aboot Vleuten?

Funko
10-07-2007, 13:39:07
Hamburg is the second largest port city in Europe, and has the second largest port but Antwerp is the second biggest port in Europe if you measure it by the amount of of goods passing through it.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:40:17
And your churches suck too. Look at this list:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_churches_in_the_world

Antwerp? Rotterdam? Bah!

So Hamburg has the largest port+churches in Europe! Hah!

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:40:46
In other words, Hamburg build a shitload of useless quays just so it could pretend to be second biggest.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:41:07
Originally posted by Funko
Hamburg is the second largest port city in Europe, and has the second largest port but Antwerp is the second biggest port in Europe if you measure it by the amount of of goods passing through it.
That means we have a bigger dick but Antwerp has more sex?

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:41:56
I hate churches anyway soooooooooo tralalalalala en pfffffrrrrrrrrt in your face

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:42:22
Antwerp has a tiny little area called "port" and the crane drivers work overtime

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:43:07
St Nikolai is ugly!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Hamburg_StNikolai_Panorama.jpg/256px-Hamburg_StNikolai_Panorama.jpg

While Antwerp's Cathedral of our Lady is beautiful!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Cathedral_of_our_Lady_1_%28Piotr_Kuczynski%29.jpg/450px-Cathedral_of_our_Lady_1_%28Piotr_Kuczynski%29.jpg

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:44:28
Originally posted by C.G.B. Spender
That means we have a bigger dick but Antwerp has more sex?

Our slung is prettier. See above.

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:44:39
and in the pic is silvio brabo tooooooo

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:46:00
Where is the church in the second pic?

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:46:33
:lol:

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:46:41
Oh, now I see it. I thought it was Mr_B's little brother

Zopperoni
10-07-2007, 13:47:46
Amsterdam:

Inhabitants: 738.763
Inhabitants Greater Amsterdam: 1.498.205
Nationalities: 173
Mayor: 1
Bicycles: 600.000
Trees: 220.000
Bulbflowers in parks and public gardens: 600.000
Parks: 28
City trams: 232
Ferryboats: 9
Markets: 21
Flower Market: 1
Shops: 10.334
Antique shops: 165
Diamond polishing factories: 24
Canals: 165
Bridges: 1.281
Wooden drawbridges: 8
Skinny Bridge: 1
Glass-topped canal boats and saloonboats: 110
Houseboats: 2.500
16th, 17th and 18th century buildings: 6.800
Gablestones: 654
Royal Palace: 1
Statues and sculptures: 302
Windmills: 6
Museums: 51
Art galeries: 141
Paintings of Rembrandt: 22
Nightwatch: 1
Civic Guard Gallery: 1
Paintings of Van Gogh: 206
Wax statues at Madame Tussaud's: 140
Animals at the Artis Zoo: 6.100
Barrel organs: 4
Carillons: 9
Historical church organs: 42
Concerts and theatrical performances per year: 16.000
Concerts and theatrical performances per day: 40
Theaters and concert halls: 55
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra: 1
Muziektheater: 1
Cinemas: 61
Cafés and bars: 1.402
Discotheques: 36
Restaurants: 755
Hotelbeds: 38.200
Camping sites: 5
Bednights by visitors from abroad per year: 8.332.600
Day visitors per year: 15.854.000

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:49:12
You only got 1 Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra? Shocking

Zopperoni
10-07-2007, 13:49:38
Yea, I wish we had more Mayors too :(

Funko
10-07-2007, 13:52:13
It's spelt Counterglow Poster.

Colon
10-07-2007, 13:52:51
Originally posted by Zopperoni
Amsterdam:

Inhabitants: 738.763
Inhabitants Greater Amsterdam: 1.498.205
Nationalities: 173
Mayor: 1
Bicycles: 600.000
Trees: 220.000
Bulbflowers in parks and public gardens: 600.000
Parks: 28
City trams: 232
Ferryboats: 9
Markets: 21
Flower Market: 1
Shops: 10.334
Antique shops: 165
Diamond polishing factories: 24
Canals: 165
Bridges: 1.281
Wooden drawbridges: 8
Skinny Bridge: 1
Glass-topped canal boats and saloonboats: 110
Houseboats: 2.500
16th, 17th and 18th century buildings: 6.800
Gablestones: 654
Royal Palace: 1
Statues and sculptures: 302
Windmills: 6
Museums: 51
Art galeries: 141
Paintings of Rembrandt: 22
Nightwatch: 1
Civic Guard Gallery: 1
Paintings of Van Gogh: 206
Wax statues at Madame Tussaud's: 140
Animals at the Artis Zoo: 6.100
Barrel organs: 4
Carillons: 9
Historical church organs: 42
Concerts and theatrical performances per year: 16.000
Concerts and theatrical performances per day: 40
Theaters and concert halls: 55
Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra: 1
Muziektheater: 1
Cinemas: 61
Cafés and bars: 1.402
Discotheques: 36
Restaurants: 755
Hotelbeds: 38.200
Camping sites: 5
Bednights by visitors from abroad per year: 8.332.600
Day visitors per year: 15.854.000

What about brothels, coffee shops and squats?

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:53:28
and amsterdam has one hooker too

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 13:54:59
A lot of bicycles ...

mr_B
10-07-2007, 13:56:46
Concerts and theatrical performances per year: 16.000
Concerts and theatrical performances per day: 40

:eek:

Zopperoni
10-07-2007, 14:03:58
Originally posted by Colon
What about brothels, coffee shops and squats?
I think they're hidden within Art galleries, Cafes and bars, and Animals at the Artis Zoo.

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 14:04:36
and the bikes?

Oerdin
10-07-2007, 14:06:38
About where I live? Hmm, the city is almost bankrupt from bad government and corruption. Oh, and we have nice weather.

MOBIUS
10-07-2007, 14:07:49
Cardiff (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardiff)

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 14:08:07
We have the second largest weather in Europe

Lazarus and the Gimp
10-07-2007, 18:18:20
http://www.quaymarinas.com/assets/images/portishead_approach.jpg

C.G.B. Spender
10-07-2007, 18:35:36
Nice nuclear test site

jsorense
10-07-2007, 20:26:27
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Barbara%2C_CaliforniaIts quality not quantity.:coolgrin:

jsorense
10-07-2007, 20:27:38
Originally posted by jsorense
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Barbara%2C_California
Its quality not quantity.:coolgrin:

Gramercy Riffs
10-07-2007, 22:22:03
Big.

VetLegion-
11-07-2007, 00:10:43
Zagreb

Capital of the Republic of Croatia. World famous for being the biggest Croatian city and my present location. It's a fairly ordinary central european city going back about 1000 years but most of which was built in 19th century and onwards.

Has a quickly growing economy (~7% annually for the last couple of years) and good prospects. The standard of living can be pretty good if you can afford it.