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Funko
25-04-2007, 08:33:11
The title should ensure no-one enters.

Anyway:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/6589301.stm#chinese

Ok, the Chinese test is relatively complicated, I think I could have done it easily pre-university I might try later and see if I can remember any maths at all!

What I can't believe is that the English question is a 1st year Uni maths question, even for Chemists. That's very basic GCSE stuff.

Mr. Bas
25-04-2007, 08:37:26
Yeah, the English question is shockingly easy. That's stuff that you learn three or four years before leaving high school. The chinese question is the kind of geometry question that also could very well appear in our advanced maths exams though. At least, back in the days when I graduated from high school.

Funko
25-04-2007, 08:40:41
I did Maths and Further Maths at A Level which actually covered most of the Maths I needed for my Physics degree, I certainly didn't bother going to any Maths lectures, but the Chinese question was probably about the level we were doing then.

Funko
25-04-2007, 08:52:30
A 3-4-5 triangle though!!

Funko
25-04-2007, 08:57:41
Randomly googling for entrance requirements for Chemistry courses, I found Hull. They don't actually require A-Level Maths at all.

http://www.hull.ac.uk/chemistry/entryLevel.php?PHPSESSID=12aa436661eacfb148ea54097 40fbf37

Hmm. Nor does Bristol, which is actually a pretty good university.

http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/Ugrad/chempass.htm

Mr. Bas
25-04-2007, 08:59:40
Indeed. And there's no need to actually make any logical steps anywhere, all you need to know is pythagoras' theorem, the area of a triangle and what a tangent is. If this is a typical question, it's a disgrace.

Funko
25-04-2007, 09:02:06
I guess the disgrace is not that that is a typical question, but that they feel they need to ask it because some people applying for degree level chemistry might not know the answers. I would hope it's not a good university that's asking that.

King_Ghidra
25-04-2007, 09:03:20
i'm no chemistry expert but is there a significant reason why you would need advanced maths knowledge to study it at uni level?

physics i can understand.

does universty level biology have a similar maths requirement?

Funko
25-04-2007, 09:14:32
Any science requires a fairly advanced level of maths knowledge, if for nothing other than statistical analysis of data.

In fairly basic chemistry you have things like reaction rates, things react at a certain speed, get converted into other things, and the concentrations change and reaction rates change so you need fairly decent algebra skills even for stuff like that.

That said, the specific Chinese example, of geometry, probably isn't all that relevant for Chemistry I think it's more an example of the difference in culture. Especially if they are doing as standard problems that most people in Britain would never learn. Actually, most people don't ever need to know that stuff.

Mr. Bas
25-04-2007, 09:29:24
Some basic math skills indeed are necessary. It seems, though, that for the more mathematically advanced directions within chemistry (like chemical physics or theoretical chemistry) they do require A-level maths.

JM^3
25-04-2007, 09:30:56
Chemists I know did some quantum mechanics and some thermodynamics. Both fields have decent level of mathematics understanding required.

Jon Miller

Immortal Wombat
25-04-2007, 13:14:45
So in China it's compulsory to do the equivalent of A-level maths, and in England it isn't, so universities have to check you can still do the basics. It's not that shocking really, it's a direct result of lowering entry standards because not enough people are applying for science places.

Drekkus
25-04-2007, 13:42:41
Originally posted by Funko
The title should ensure no-one enters.

Anyway:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/education/6589301.stm#chinese

Ok, the Chinese test is relatively complicated, I think I could have done it easily pre-university I might try later and see if I can remember any maths at all!

What I can't believe is that the English question is a 1st year Uni maths question, even for Chemists. That's very basic GCSE stuff. I'm confused. Where's the elephant in that test?

Fistandantilus
25-04-2007, 14:17:40
You have to draw it :rolleyes:

Funko
25-04-2007, 14:44:37
Drekkus - F!

Drekkus
25-04-2007, 14:47:38
Is Minus F worse then F Minus?

Funko
25-04-2007, 14:51:38
You fail again.

Drekkus
25-04-2007, 15:00:44
Again?