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View Full Version : Have there ever been any good black british musicians?


Snapcase
30-04-2002, 19:10:31
No, honestly. I mean, Black people from Africa to the Carribean to North america have produced some of the best and most enduring popular music in the world. White britons have been doing okay compared to their country's small size. But black britons? I'm sure good records by black britons exist, but I sure as hell haven't heard any. Anyone able to help?

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 08:19:32
Goldie and Tricky?

There's loads of good drum 'n' bass and other dance stuff, I have no idea which records are made by black and / or white artists though.

FunkyFingers
01-05-2002, 09:03:47
There have been some, but their names completely escape me.

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 09:19:03
Stevie Wonder

Noisy
01-05-2002, 09:19:19
Shirley Bassey!

FunkyFingers
01-05-2002, 09:52:21
Mica Paris? Sade?

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 11:31:07
5 star

FunkyFingers
01-05-2002, 11:43:05
Originally posted by MikeH
5 star

LMAO!:lol:

King_Ghidra
01-05-2002, 12:13:15
Roni Size & Reprazent

Carl Cox

Craig David??!?!?!?

Seal (if you like that kind of thing...)

Noisy
01-05-2002, 12:14:46
M People

Bossman
01-05-2002, 15:37:26
Originally posted by King_Ghidra


Craig David??!?!?!?



How dare you...

King_Ghidra
01-05-2002, 15:55:56
he's all over your ass *boink*

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 15:56:53
He met a Bossman on Monday, they went for a drink on tuesday, they made love on wednesday, thursday, friday, saturday and chilled on Sunday.

Lazarus and the Gimp
01-05-2002, 17:19:38
Roni Size, Horace Andy, Steel Pulse, 2/3 of Massive Attack, Tricky, Credit to the Nation, The Ruthless Rap Assassins, sections of The Specials and many other Ska bands.

walruskkkch
01-05-2002, 17:50:02
Milli Vanilli?

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 19:16:23
Own goal... they were German.

Vincent Fandango
01-05-2002, 20:02:41
Double own goal: they weren't musicians

Snapcase
01-05-2002, 20:51:38
Goldie

I thought he was white.

Tricky, Mica Paris, 5 star, Carl Cox, Credit to the Nation, The Ruthless Rap Assassins

Never heard of 'em. I'll check it out.

Stevie Wonder

Own Goal.

Shirley Bassey!

Yaaay!

Sade

Possibly the most overrated musician ever. Totally shit.

Seal

No.

Craig David

I like my R&B real, not a pale copy.

Roni Size & Reprazent

I've seen him live. It was awful.

M People

Okay, I like the M People.

Horace Andy

One of the greats but... Jamaican. Sorry.

Steel Pulse

Qualify, but part of a different musical legacy really.

2/3 of Massive Attack

I like my hip-hop real, not a pale copy. Possibly the music that's aged the most of the nineties, it's very tame-sounding today.

sections of The Specials and many other Ska bands.

I like my Reggae real, not a pale copy.

---

So, let me get this straight- before 1980 there were no Black British musicians except Shirley Bassey? And only by the beginning of the nineties did they actually form their own musical styles, in the form of the exceedingly boring set of D&B and Trip-Hop?

Funkodrom
01-05-2002, 22:18:50
Goldie is a bit white, a bit black I think. How black does he need to be? 20%? 30%? 50%? 78.543%? Please define your strict racial deliniations before we continue.

As to your conclusions, either that or the posters here are too young to remember musicians pre-1980 and you are too musically narrow minded to appreciate an entire swathe of great 90s dance music. ;)

Never heard of Tricky?!

Noisy
01-05-2002, 22:42:24
Snapcase: Your condemnation of Sade and Massive Attack is just weird. From henceforward your opinion means nothing to me.

Never heard of Tricky!? You haven't actually listened to any Massive Attack, then, and you still criticise it?

Snapcase
01-05-2002, 23:08:45
I don't actively pursue Massive Attack, no. The songs I've heard have been exceedingly bland, or very conventional electronica.

Sade I quite simply see no attraction in whatsoever. A rather mundane voice singing I'm-sure-so-mature pop-soul in the eighties mould to craptacular acoustic jazz. Where's the production excitement? Where are the original hooks? Where are the memorable tunes? Where's the sense of fun, for fuck's sake?

MattHiggs
02-05-2002, 01:11:00
Roni Size is great...

I have the In the m0de album.

Funkodrom
02-05-2002, 08:23:45
I've only got Reprazent but I think that In The Mode is even better from what I've heard of it.

Sirius Black
02-05-2002, 08:25:15
Ringo Starr.

MattHiggs
02-05-2002, 10:49:44
I wasn't into Drum and Bass at all, I just found it annoying. But then I went to some festival somewhere and Roni Size was playing, it just sounded really good.

Funkodrom
02-05-2002, 10:56:13
Yeah, he's one of those artists who is so good that they can get people who aren't interested in the genre into it.

FunkyFingers
02-05-2002, 11:01:37
1/2 of Galliano
Grace Jones

What sort of music do you actually like Snappy?

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 11:26:41
I like most music as long as it's (a) original, (b) hook-filled and (c) energetic. Basically, I want lots of fun hooks blasted at me that I've never heard before.

(In terms of what I actually listen to it's mostly 60s-70s soul, proto-punk and reggae, and contemporary american garage-punk, hip-hop and urban)

Funkodrom
02-05-2002, 11:28:37
But all this new garage punk stuff isn't original at all.

FunkyFingers
02-05-2002, 12:41:57
Snappy - get hold of "A joyful noise unto the creator" by Galliano. Ignore the first track, which is pap, and enjoy.

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 14:09:24
Originally posted by MikeH
But all this new garage punk stuff isn't original at all.

I consider it an extension of the same musical legacy as that which produced the original garage and US punk sounds.

Funkodrom
02-05-2002, 14:50:10
I consider it a blatant copy.

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 14:55:47
Anyway, the other two aspects are more important. As long as the hooks and arrangements are fresh, I don't much care about the "sound". Whereas most other genres degenerate into using exactly similar instrumentation, phrasing, flourishes, chord progressions, voices, arrangements, drumming patterns, melody structures, timing, openings, closings, etc. to the extent that one band is indistinguishable from another (Pop Punk and Nu-Metal are the obvious culprits here), garage punk never loses the creative edge, sound or no sound.

Funkodrom
02-05-2002, 14:58:40
They pretty much all sound the same to me I think it's easier to distinguish bands within genres that you like, rather than you like the genre because you can distinguish the bands.

FunkyFingers
02-05-2002, 15:07:09
genres schmenres. Who cares what genre a band or style of music is in - if you like it and you think it sounds good, it's a good band/song/whatever.

Resource Consumer
02-05-2002, 15:16:04
Courtney Pine has been around for years. And let us recall the Selecter and The Specials/Funboy3

Resource Consumer
02-05-2002, 15:16:30
And one from the 60s - Eddie Grant

FunkyFingers
02-05-2002, 15:48:43
Of course, there's "Oui 3", with a fantastic lyric
"and it hurts and it hurts and it hurts like pain does"

Lazarus and the Gimp
02-05-2002, 17:30:01
Originally posted by Snapcase
I don't actively pursue Massive Attack, no. The songs I've heard have been exceedingly bland, or very conventional electronica.



You really haven't heard very much, have you? "Mezzanine" contains some genuinely brutal guitar-work. Massive Attack produce very edgy and paranoid music- how you can say it's a pale copy of hip-hop staggers me.

Interesting that you praise Horace Andy as one of the greats, and gloss over the fact that his best work is the (many) tracks he did with Massive Attack.

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 17:33:45
Like I said, I haven't heard much Massive Attack. I've been meaning to buy an album of their stuff, but never got around to it. Write it up as a potential future conquest.

Also, I know Horace Andy mainly as possibly the best Roots Reggae artist after Bob. Jah Jah Children is brilliant.

Sean
02-05-2002, 17:36:53
That would probably be Dissolved Girl or Group Four for the brutal guitar work, just in case Snapcase wants to give them a listen before criticising them.

Lazarus and the Gimp
02-05-2002, 22:09:44
Or "Angel".

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 22:46:14
Oh all right I'll download them all. See if I like any of them.

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 23:09:44
Angel: Woefully repetitive. Has an entirety of six hooks (of which one "good", ie. totally different from everything else). And two of which aren't even used in the first half. The thought of stretching something like this out to a total of six (!) minutes is astounding- even a call to minimalism can't justify repeating a set of hooks that are not totally groundbreakingly magnificent (nothing of Timbaland level here) or utterly sublime (nor any tendencies towards soul). A is for My Arse.

The difference between this and something of quality like Get Ur Freak On is pretty obvious. Both use similar instrumentation. Both are minimalist in their production in that every sound has a purpose and every level is clearly defined. Both have basic hooks that are essentially repetitions of a simple note-pattern. However, one is unusual, varies itself constantly (litsen to the fadeout, where the basic hook is improvised around), has unexpected breaks, has a bridge, brings new hooks in and out of the production, yet manages to stay coherent and congruent. The other has one (!) change in the entire song, and manages to feel entirely non-song-like anyway.

I'm beginning to worry that I might have downloaded the wrong song... :hmm:

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 23:33:11
Group For: Serious Goldfrapp warning on this one. Easy litsening french chanson mood music, again soulless, a guy whispering incoherently. For eight minutes. Awful.

Snapcase
02-05-2002, 23:50:59
Dissolved Girl: I actually quite like this one. Nicely melodic, good lyrics. Cutting it in half and dropping the Old-Skool beats would do it a favour, though. Stil not very soulful. More Dido than Aretha, so to speak.

Lazarus and the Gimp
03-05-2002, 07:08:30
Alison Goldfrapp? What do you store in your ears, you bizarre Scandinavian? That's Elizabeth Fraser- the most disctinctive and unique female vocal on this planet.

And in slating "Angel", you're slating what Horace Andy considers his best ever recorded performance. What's more, the instrumentation between "Angel" and "Get ur freak on" is totally different- "Angel" was a live band studio recording with top-end fx and vocal overdubs. Can you, in all honesty, say that bears any resemblance to the Pro-tools onslaught of "Get ur freak on"?

It's meant to be oppressive. It's meant to be threatening. This is music with nuances, not a "paint by numbers" trowelling of anything that can't climb out of the bucket.

You're breaking music down into functional blueprints with a nod to "soul" and "fun" to remind people that you're human. Keep that up and you'll end up praising Yes albums.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 08:17:02
It sounds like you enjoy analysing snippets of music and pigeon-holeing them in to micro-genres more than you do actually enjoy wanting to listen to music for the sake of just enjoying the music!

Lighten up!

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 08:24:06
Yeah!

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 10:59:47
Honestly, I think I downloaded the wrong track for Angel. Must have been mislabelled- It sounds like a Boards of Canada track, and there's no Horace Andy on it.

Still, you indie types are all the same. Go on, litsen to your damned depressive inferior music. Wallow in your damn self-pity. Stop caring about basic qualities like "songwriting" and "joy of creation", go for your laboured, ill-written tripe. Go on, put on that radiohead track, you'll like it! Oh sure, there's not an ounce of geniune human emotion that comes even remotely close to touching it, but hey, I'm so cool, I litsen to subtle music, right? Oh, right, I can pile layers of noise onto each other. How threatening.

The Simple Pop Song is the most threatening form of musical expression that's ever been concocted in the brains of man. Oooh, look at Elvis, Wraggling his hips. It's only got three chords! How can you listen to that? "I Love you, I love you", Mr. Spector, how can you write such irredeemable nonsense? They can't even play their instruments! Better snuggle back and litsen to my hard bop, my Stravinskij, my latest Elbow album, suitably dense and complex, and shut my eyes and ears to the rest of the world. Mommy.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 11:09:40
It's possible to like both simple and complicated music. You are missing out by denying yourself anything but simplistic stuff.

You are also tagging our musical tastes unfairly. You are categorising us with bullshit genre definitions.

Indy Schmindy.

Subtle is good.

Elvis is good.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 11:11:17
Oh and depressive music is good, nothing more annoying than relentlessly upbeat music. Life's not like that. If it hasn't got any kind of dark edge to it it's most likely going to bore me pretty soon. It doesn't have anything for me to relate to.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 11:38:22
Originally posted by MikeH
Life's not like that.

There's a difference between sad or angry songs about shit happening to you and the kind of depressive music that appeals to people with chemical imbalances. I'm perfectly happy to accept songs about how angry you are with the world and everyone, how your world has collapsed since your baby left you, how you're down with the blues since your best friend died, whatever. What I don't like is the kind of medically depressive music written by medically depressive people for medically depressive people. Sardonic, sneering, lifeless droning, empty music for empty lives. How on earth can people who just don't care any more be expected to make good music?

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 11:53:43
If they had totally lost it and didn't care they wouldn't be able to make the music at all. It's too hard.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 12:03:23
You're saying that you can only enjoy music because of it's insane technical difficulty, if it's completely original, if it's got more than 3 chords in it, only if it's up-beat, if it's angry and if it doesn't conform to a genre (apart from the micro-genre that you like)?

How do you know what mental state a musician was in when he/she wrote a particular song? Why should that make any difference to your own appreciation of the music? Some of the greatest musicians of all time (Geniuses) were just that because of their mental instability. But, ok, that's not genuine human emotion, it's just the ramblings of a depressive madman who only wants to dig himself further in to his hole, so it can't possibly be of any value.

You have no idea of the type of music I listen to - and yet you label me an "indie" type. How wrong could you be! I dare you to examine my cd collection and actually attempt to categorise my musical tastes in any genre. I simply like music that I enjoy listening to: from Mozart to Moorcheeba, from Brahms to the Beatles, from Leftfield to Linkim Park.

Again though, you simply dismiss an entire genre of expression simply because you think that it doesn't conform to the the narrow focus of what you think makes good music.

Elvis - wrote some excellent songs. Also wrote some rubbish songs. Most of his songs are simple, uplifting, rock 'n rolling fun songs, or love ballads. They make you feel good and you don't need a degree in guitar technique to play them. Doesn't mean that "all Elvis songs are crap". Doesn't mean all songs with only 3 chords in are crap. Doesn't mean that all songs about love are crap. Doesn't mean all music written before 2001 is crap. etc. There are good and bad examples of all artists works. Artists develop, change their styles etc.


Ultimately, music is an emotive subject, and a personal one. Everybody is moved in different ways, to different degrees, by different things. However, the weakest thing to do, in my opinion, is to close your mind off to music that you've not considered listening to because it doesn't conform to the limits of the genre that you think is best. Thinking that - "because you like style xxxx, therefore your opinions on music are valueless" is so wrong.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 12:14:21
Funky has a great music collection. Very varied. He's got stuff that I love, stuff that I hate and quite a lot of stuff that I used to hate until I heard him play it a few times and then came to like.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 13:49:03
Originally posted by FunkyFingers
You're saying that you can only enjoy music because of it's insane technical difficulty, if it's completely original, if it's got more than 3 chords in it, only if it's up-beat, if it's angry and if it doesn't conform to a genre (apart from the micro-genre that you like)?

Quite the opposite, not quite, quite the opposite, not quite, no, not really. Most of that paragraph was meant to be starcastic, perhaps I should insert more Rolleyes smilies. :D

How do you know what mental state a musician was in when he/she wrote a particular song? Why should that make any difference to your own appreciation of the music? Some of the greatest musicians of all time (Geniuses) were just that because of their mental instability. But, ok, that's not genuine human emotion, it's just the ramblings of a depressive madman who only wants to dig himself further in to his hole, so it can't possibly be of any value.

Just like different drugs produce different types of music because of their different mind-altering properties, so do different mental illnesses. Obsessive-Compulsive is often great. Schitzophrenic I don't mind, plane bonkers is one of my favourite ones. Depressive isn't. I dislike all the "depression classics", Berlin-era Bowie and Iggy (this is coming from a die-hard Bowie and Stooges fan, mind), Joy Division, etc. There's no life in them. There is no emotion at all, no anger, no sadness, just nothing. Boring.

You have no idea of the type of music I listen to - and yet you label me an "indie" type.

I believe I labelled Laz an Indie type. It was meant as a slightly jokey insult. :D

Again though, you simply dismiss an entire genre of expression simply because you think that it doesn't conform to the the narrow focus of what you think makes good music.

Yup. What's wrong with that?

Elvis - wrote some excellent songs. Also wrote some rubbish songs. Most of his songs are simple, uplifting, rock 'n rolling fun songs, or love ballads. They make you feel good and you don't need a degree in guitar technique to play them. Doesn't mean that "all Elvis songs are crap". Doesn't mean all songs with only 3 chords in are crap. Doesn't mean that all songs about love are crap. Doesn't mean all music written before 2001 is crap. etc. There are good and bad examples of all artists works. Artists develop, change their styles etc.

Elvis never wrote any songs at all, as far as I know. And he's one of my favourites. From Elvis in Memphis is a permanent part of my litsening sessions.

Ultimately, music is an emotive subject, and a personal one. Everybody is moved in different ways, to different degrees, by different things. However, the weakest thing to do, in my opinion, is to close your mind off to music that you've not considered listening to because it doesn't conform to the limits of the genre that you think is best. Thinking that - "because you like style xxxx, therefore your opinions on music are valueless" is so wrong.

Perhaps it's because I'm from a philosophy background, but I don't believe in Taste in music at all. Once you start theorising about what makes music good or bad (another tendency of philosophy students, just pop into any aesthetics course), you lose the emotive appeal and start to produce theories. No-one ever said to Kant that they liked his taste in Ethics. :) When you factor post-modernist discourse-theory whatnot into the whole thing, the theories become strategies within a system of discourse, and my "taste" becomes my "truth". This is likely not your truth, but it's mine, and therefore to me it's the only one.

And yes, I'll continue to dismiss entire genres, Prog-Rock for instance, and the outputs of entire bands, Yes for instance, without looking back or worrying if I've done the right thing. I'm sure it all becomes relative when I'm thirty-five, but right now let me be nasty and discriminative.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 14:00:28
Hang on, you are the one who's theorising about what makes music good or bad, we're just saying go for the stuff you like. You are strictly deliniating what makes music 'good' or 'bad' or 'worthwhile' or 'pointless' based on a random and extremely narrow definition of what makes good music which can only have come from your own 'taste'.

I'm not sure I should have replied to that last paragraph though 'cause it sounds like a complete load of bollocks to me, I think you're using long meaningless words to befuddle us.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 14:02:37
ps. King Ghidra has a philosophical background and whilst I don't always agree with his musical taste I know he's listening to stuff that he really loves rather than stuff he thinks fits some fascistic musical formula.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 14:04:19
Aah, you're a philosophy student, why didn't you say so before... Now I know to dismiss everything you say as complete mental masturbation :D

My fiancee teaches aesthetics to dance degree students as part of their arts appreciation course. I get similar strings of conversations regarding dance as we're having over music.

I think ultimately I'm argueing over broad-brush dismissals of entire genres and artists, and the incessant need to compartmentalize music in to convenient little boxes. Genre classifying is merely a marketing exercise. In the end there's no argueing over whether you like piece A and not piece B; if you don't like piece B then you don't like piece B. But saying that, because pieces C &D are outwardly similar in genre to piece B and so therefore must be crap, is I believe, not right, but easy to do.

And Radiohead are fantastic :p

King_Ghidra
03-05-2002, 14:14:30
Originally posted by MikeH
ps. King Ghidra has a philosophical background and whilst I don't always agree with his musical taste I know he's listening to stuff that he really loves rather than stuff he thinks fits some fascistic musical formula.

Mike you're too kind :o

But it's true, I listen with my heart not my head - i don't understand Snappy criticising the idea of judging music on arbritrary 'kantian' formulas and yet simultaneously dismissing entire genres on a similarly arbritrary basis

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 14:20:20
You're right, I was too kind.

You might love it but you've got no taste. ;)

Lazarus and the Gimp
03-05-2002, 14:57:24
Interesting....

Snapcase rejects entire genres en masse, yet he seems to think I'm narrow minded.

I bought the Sugababes single today.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 14:58:32
Adam Bomb was saying we should cover that 'cause it's really good but I haven't heard it (or if I have I didn't know it was them)

King_Ghidra
03-05-2002, 15:02:49
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Interesting....

Snapcase rejects entire genres en masse, yet he seems to think I'm narrow minded.

I bought the Sugababes single today.

oh baby that rocks my world!

I have the original bootleg by Girls on Top aka some DJ guy - it is Adena Howard's 'Freak Like me' vs gary Numan & Tubeway army's Are friends electric?

This great Bootleg site can help everyone enjoy life:

http://www.base58.com/booms/archives/2002_04_01_archive.html

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 15:04:58
Is the Sugarbabes Freak Like Me on that site the single you guys are talking about? I'm downloading it now.

King_Ghidra
03-05-2002, 15:08:17
yes, but you can hear the original bootleg as well

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 15:09:55
I'll download it next

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 15:17:59
The Sugarbabes version is a lot better than I expected.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 15:22:04
The Adina Howard version is good too. Be nice to hear that version at the speed of the Sugarbabes version.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 15:55:36
Originally posted by MikeH
Hang on, you are the one who's theorising about what makes music good or bad, we're just saying go for the stuff you like. You are strictly deliniating what makes music 'good' or 'bad' or 'worthwhile' or 'pointless' based on a random and extremely narrow definition of what makes good music which can only have come from your own 'taste'.

I consider my system to be a pretty decent, non-arbitrary, non-clashing system for rationally deciding what music is good and what is bad. I'm sure most people have such a system, conciously or unconciously. If you chose to call this system "taste", than that's your prerogative.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 15:58:19
I'm hardly a rational person, that sounds way too conscriptive to me.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 15:59:47
I prefer just to listen to it a couple of times.
:clueless:

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:00:27
Yeah. And not think about what it is just how it makes me feel.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:01:06
However, Snapcase, I think you'd fit in well at NME.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:01:50
Originally posted by FunkyFingers
Genre classifying is merely a marketing exercise. In the end there's no argueing over whether you like piece A and not piece B; if you don't like piece B then you don't like piece B. But saying that, because pieces C &D are outwardly similar in genre to piece B and so therefore must be crap, is I believe, not right, but easy to do.

See, I don't see it that way. I think categorisation, compartmentalisation, ranking, rationalising are all basic human instincts, and make up both the evolutionary reason for and the bulk of our intelligence. Whether it's recognising dangerous situations in the fields of africa or recognising good music when you hear it (:D) categorisation is a vital part of the human experience. I don't think most bands believe in a genreless system either.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:04:44
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Interesting....

Snapcase rejects entire genres en masse, yet he seems to think I'm narrow minded.

No i don't. Everyone over 25 is too broad-minded! :D

(I love the new Sugababes single... I heard it on Channel 5 for the first time yesterday, otherwise I might have bought it too when I was in town buying the Yeah Yeah Yeahs EP and the new Tweet single.)

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:05:07
Originally posted by MikeH
However, Snapcase, I think you'd fit in well at NME.

I try. :o

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:07:10
Most bands disagree that they are in the genre that 'journalists' suggest they belong to.

Most of us don't posess the language to describe music properly so we invent genres to help us categorise things. It's arbitrary and doesn't mean the same to different people. I mean your criteria for what bands you like:

"I like most music as long as it's (a) original, (b) hook-filled and (c) energetic. Basically, I want lots of fun hooks blasted at me that I've never heard before."

Describes most of the bands that I like. It's just that what I think is energetic, hook filled and original you think is formulaic and boring. I also like it to have a dark edge to it but your definition doesn't preclude that.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:08:14
Originally posted by Snapcase


I try. :o

You are right, that was meant as an insult. :D

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:08:32
(Currently litsening to a religious acoustic singer/songwriter album. I'm not that narrowminded. :shoot: )

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:10:20
Originally posted by MikeH
Most bands disagree that they are in the genre that 'journalists' suggest they belong to.

Most of us don't posess the language to describe music properly so we invent genres to help us categorise things. It's arbitrary and doesn't mean the same to different people. I mean your criteria for what bands you like:

"I like most music as long as it's (a) original, (b) hook-filled and (c) energetic. Basically, I want lots of fun hooks blasted at me that I've never heard before."

Describes most of the bands that I like. It's just that what I think is energetic, hook filled and original you think is formulaic and boring. I also like it to have a dark edge to it but your definition doesn't preclude that.

I'll include "dark-edged" too. Most music I litsen to is dark-edged. :)

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:11:32
Oh dear. Spunk that right off and download some Fantomas.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:12:21
Originally posted by Snapcase


I'll include "dark-edged" too. Most music I litsen to is dark-edged. :)

OK so your definition is exactly the same as how I'd describe the stuff that I love the most.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:16:52
But the bands are different.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:16:54
Actually, this album is very nice indeed. "Lauryn Hill MTV Unplugged No. 2.0". Awesome.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:17:58
I heard Alice In Chains Unplugged the other day. Absolutely spectacular album.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:21:16
Latest fashionable genre:

"Electroclash".

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:22:35
Phrase most likely to make me form a negative impression before I hear the music:

"Latest fashionable genre"

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 16:23:15
Try listening to something from a "genre" you've never experienced before. Actually listen to it more than once because the initial unfamilarity may repulse you at first. Then when you find you like it, you'll realise that the idea of trying to catagorize your own musical tastes in to certain genres is futile because you've just blown open your own system.
I'm not talking either about "well I like Nu-Ultra-Dense-Plutonium-Metal but not "Nu-even-denser-with-a-tinge-of-anti-matter-Metal because the latter isn't dark enough".

Most bands who try to do their own thing do believe in a genreless system because they all try to "Be Unique" and "have their own sound" and "Do something creative" - ie trying not to conform to a genre stereotype. Then as soon as they manage that, some twat journalist from the NME comes along and puts them in a nice new category. What a load of tosh!

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:24:32
I'm going to make a mix CD of stuff from genres he doesn't like for the CG meeting. PM me suggestions.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:26:34
If it's a genre I've never experienced before I can usually appreciate it. The "problem" from your point of view would be that I usually dismiss entire genres based on a selection of just a few songs. New genres are not a problem- I started litsening to Grindcore recently even though it's totally outside my normal scope.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 16:27:56
Originally posted by Snapcase
If it's a genre I've never experienced before I can usually appreciate it. The "problem" from your point of view would be that I usually dismiss entire genres based on a selection of just a few songs. New genres are not a problem- I started litsening to Grindcore recently even though it's totally outside my normal scope.


"Grindcore"
I rest my case.

:hmm:

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:28:20
Did you listen to that Goatsblood? I started listening to it 'cause of the ridiculous names, then got to like it and then found out that the Goatsblood album is an absolute classic sludgecore album. I can't tell the difference between Grindcore and Sludgecore though.

FunkyFingers
03-05-2002, 16:30:25
I've got a radical idea. Why don't you classify each band as an individual genre, and name the genre after the bands name.
So, Goatsblood sounds like whatever goatsblood sounds like. Future sound of London sounds like whatever FSOL sounds like. Mozart sounds like Mozart. Sepultura sounds like Sepultura.

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:33:18
Goatsblood sound like someone slowly scraping a few cars over a scrap yard whilst some tribal drummers on mogadon and a vomiting brown bear attempt to summon their many headed lizard god.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:34:59
Bah. Rejecting Genres is part of rejecting popular culture, withdrawn, self-important snobbishness. I was wrong about Funky, he is an Indie Boy after all. :D

Funkodrom
03-05-2002, 16:37:15
Anyone who attempted to get their stereo in time with mine both blasting out sepultura as a nice surprise for potential students visiting our hall on open day can't be an indy boy.

Lazarus and the Gimp
03-05-2002, 16:43:17
Aw, cobblers. Genres just exist so people can answer the question "What do they soound like?" without it becoming a thesis.

Snapcase
03-05-2002, 16:47:50
I accept the Gimpian peace proposal, and am willing to amend the definition of Genre in the Treaty of Counterglow to the suggested formulation.

Sean
03-05-2002, 17:08:59
Originally posted by Fred Summery
Snapcase thinks in genres.

We all like the music we like because of how it makes us feel, not by counting hooks or because it is genre music.

Aren’t we great?

PosterBoy
03-05-2002, 20:01:48
I like the music I like because all the cool people talk to me