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View Full Version : 1994 - best year in music evah!


Mr. Bas
02-02-2007, 13:52:44
I just noticed the 'sort by year of release' option in my media player. I played around with it for a bit, and it struck me how many ace albums were released in 1994. Sure, I'm biased towards that era and it probably wasn't a very groundbreaking year. But just look: Superunknown (Soundgarden), Troublegum (Therapy?), The Downward Spiral (NIN), Welcome to Sky Valley (Kyuss), Smash (Offspring), The Holy Bible (Manics), Whiskey for the Holy Ghost (Mark Lanegan), Vitalogy (Pearl Jam), Dummy (Portishead), Weezer's first album, Music for a Jilted Generation (Prodigy). Hell, even Korn, Green Day and Live made their best albums that year. So I hereby declare 1994 the best year of releases ever.

Discuss!

Scabrous Birdseed
02-02-2007, 14:15:02
I hereby declare 1994 the worst year of releases ever. Britpop was at its loathsome, braggish, sarcastic peak, with Parklife (Blur), Definately Maybe (Oasis) and His'n'Hers (Pulp). Hip-hop, seemingly rescued by the west coast the previous year, gets dragged down by dreary, backpackerish east coast crap by Nas and Notorious B.I.G who both debut this year, signalling the end of the golden era of the genre. Dance music dies with the Criminal Justice Act in britain banning raves and a million eurocheese clones around europe. Kurt Cobain commits suicide, thus neatly ending anything good coming from Seattle. Riverdance makes a big breakthrough. The "Concious" (ie. boring) Dancehall movement slows down progress in Ragga music. Ace of Base release "The Sign". The "MTV Unplugged" series reaches its commercial peak. "Love is All Around" by Wet Wet Wet is the biggest-selling single of the year.

;)

Gramercy Riffs
02-02-2007, 14:29:09
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Britpop was at its loathsome, braggish, sarcastic peak, with Parklife (Blur), Definately Maybe (Oasis) and His'n'Hers (Pulp)

Bollocks, that peak was in 1997. And those are three great albums.

Scabrous Birdseed
02-02-2007, 14:35:07
No they're not.

Gramercy Riffs
02-02-2007, 14:38:44
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
No they're not.

Sorry, you're right. They're not.

Scabrous Birdseed
02-02-2007, 15:12:34
See. I told you.

King_Ghidra
02-02-2007, 15:17:30
i agree with gramercy about the 94 97 thing without reservation.

as a student in 94 it felt like a wonderful new phenomenon, even though i was a blur fan and was anti-oasis on principle) whereas by 96/97 it was so fucking jaded and mainstream it was horrible.

and purely on the basis of having The Holy Bible and Dummy released in 94 it was a very good year

Scabrous Birdseed
02-02-2007, 15:28:43
It's the wonderful new phenomena you should be afraid of. You get swept along by the hype and suddenly you realise you've been listening to a disgustingly smug man singing about gender confusion with way too much self distance.

Good 1994 albums, as far as I'm able to tell, there's only two of. "My Life" by Mary J Blige and "Elegant Slumming" by M People. "Age Ain't Nothing But a Number" by Aaliyah is not too bad either, I guess.

Gramercy Riffs
02-02-2007, 15:46:19
M People?!

This debate is over.

King_Ghidra
02-02-2007, 15:47:37
elegant slumming by m people?!?!?! :eek: that is very easily in the top 10 most hated albums ever for me.

and as for your first comment, there might be a grain of truth in that, but none of the albums so far mentioned have anything to do with gender confusion, so you are either a) recounting some story of your past, or b) trading off some wanky student stereotype

Funko
02-02-2007, 16:32:30
'94 was interesting because it had the last few decent grunge albums (add Jar of Flies, Purple by Stone Temple Pilots and Kerbdog by Kerbdog to the list Bas posted) as that genre died off, the first really big Britpop albums as that exploded and there was still some cool hip-hop and dance stuff around too. Music for the Jilted Generation came out in '94...

Eklektikos
03-02-2007, 01:27:29
Kerbdog had another album apart from On The Turn? :eek:

Scabrous Birdseed
03-02-2007, 07:12:20
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
elegant slumming by m people?!?!?! :eek: that is very easily in the top 10 most hated albums ever for me.

and as for your first comment, there might be a grain of truth in that, but none of the albums so far mentioned have anything to do with gender confusion, so you are either a) recounting some story of your past, or b) trading off some wanky student stereotype

"Girls & Boys" off Parklife, surely? Right up there with Frank Zappa, Sly Stone and the Fugs in the sneering stakes.

Scabrous Birdseed
03-02-2007, 07:24:29
See, I think the difference between us, (together with a bunch of other stuff, I guess) is that I was a thirteen-year-old computer nerd living in Tanzania and spectacularly uninterested in music back in '94. I came home in the summer and wondered, briefly, what the fuss was about with the Blur vs Oasis feud (my friend Måns, 12, was a Blurite) but nothing more.

Now that either means (a) that being away from the hype means I'm able to see through the phenomenon with the benefit of time and fresh eyes. Or more likely (b) because I only found true passion in music in late 2000 I harbour a dislike of the music that didn't spark my interest when I heard it before then, like any generation does with the music of its immediate predecessors.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
03-02-2007, 10:19:26
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
...I harbour a dislike of the music that didn't spark my interest when I heard it before then, like any generation does with the music of its immediate predecessors.

I don't like Oasis because I heard the Beatles and Burt Bacharach the FIRST time around, and the originals were better then.

I'm not mad keen on Blur, but I like some of their songs, perhaps because they don't sound like meaningless terrace chants for tanked up lads.

As for disliking the music of the previous generation- I was born in 1963, but I love r'n'b', the blues and early soul, although I'm easy on the Pat Boones and Bing Crosbys of the world. Not mad keen on Jim Reeves or Slim Whitman either.... but I like the Carter Family.


...Sly Stone ... in the sneering stakes.

What on earth's that meant to mean ?

Scabrous Birdseed
03-02-2007, 20:53:24
Um, that his lyrics are very von oben and sneeringly cruel? Dude. He was not an earnest, kind, humble man.

As for the first statement that kinda fits into my theory because I tend to like a lot of stuff that was hovering semi-underground in the nineties, like Goa Trance or New Orleans Bounce or some of the Garage-rockey sounds or some of the Americana. The stuff I wouldn't have heard on MTV or commercial radio, which was all I listened to at the time. Anyway, wouldn't the generation before you have been, I dunno, Genesis-style prog rockers or disco or pub rock or something? I don't mean an entire, proper generation, man.

Lazarus and the Gimp
03-02-2007, 21:26:48
Three of my favourite bands split up that year- The God Machine (after the sudden and shocking death of Jimmy Fernandez), American Music Club and Uncle Tupelo.

Greg W
03-02-2007, 23:04:39
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
like any generation does with the music of its immediate predecessorsHave to disagree with this one personally. I was born in 71 and didn't really start listening to music until the early 80s. I happen to love 60s and 70s music. Especially bands like Led Zeppelin, the Rolling Stones, the Beach Boys, Queen, The Eagles, etc.

My vote is going to have to go for 1986 (http://www.oldielyrics.com/1986.html)...
AC/DC - Who Made Who
Beastie Boys - Licensed to Ill
Billy Idol - Whiplash Smile
Billy Joel - The Bridge
Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet
Cyndi Lauper - True Colours
Eurythmics - Revenge
Iron Maiden - Somewhere in Time
Madonna - True Blue
Paul Simon - Graceland
Queen - A Kind of Magic
Sting - Bring on the Night
Van Halen - 5150

Amongst a host of others from Black Sabbath, Blue Oyster Cult, Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, Depeche Mode, Duran Duran, Elvis Costello, Eric Clapton, Frank Zappa, Genesis, Iggy Pop, Janet Jackson, Joan Armatrading, Joe Cocker, Judas Priest, Lou Reed, Moody Blues, Motorhead, New Order, Nick Cave, Ozzy Osbourne, Pet Shop Boys, Peter Gabrtiel, Prince, Quiet Riot, REM, RATT, Rod Stewart, Roxette, Run DMC, Slayer, Sonic Youth, Status Quo, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Talking Heads, The Kinks, The Police, The Pretenders, The Ramones, The Velvet Underground, UB40, Van Morrison and Weird Al Yankovic...

Greg W
04-02-2007, 11:51:21
Oooh, I may have to disagree with myself here. MMM (my radio station) had a thing tonight about albums that were 30 years old this year. And boy was 1977 (http://www.oldielyrics.com/1977.html) a good year for albums...
10CC - Deceptive Bends
ABBA - ABBA the album
AC/DC - Let There Be Rock
Bee Gees - Saturday Night Fever (and Here At Last)
Billy Joel - The Stranger
Boney M - Love for Sale
Cat Stevens - Izitso
Chicago - Chicago XI
David Bowie - Heroes (and Low)
Elvis - Moody Blue
Eric Clapton - Slowhand
Fleetwood Mac - Rumours
Foreigner - Foreigner
Iggy Pop - Lust for Life (and The Idiot)
Judas Priest - Sin After Sin
Meatloaf - Bat out of Hell
Motorhead - Motorhead
Queen - News of the World
Rod Stewart - Footloose and Fancy Free
Santana - Moonflower
Status Quo - Rockin all Over the World
The Sex Pistols - Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols

And that's just the albums I have heard of. There's some damned fine albums in that lot.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
10-02-2007, 10:58:14
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
He was not an earnest, kind, humble man.



Yeah, I'm really digging' the sneerin' contempt for a generation in Sly's music... not.

'Family Affair':

It's a family affair
It's a family affair
It's a family affair
It's a family affair

One child grows up to be
Somebody that just loves to learn
And another child grows up to be
Somebody you'd just love to burn
Mom loves the both of them
You see it's in the blood
Both kids are good to Mom
Blood's thicker than the mud

It's a family affair
It's a family affair

Newlywed a year ago
But you're still checking each other out
Nobody wants to blow
Nobody wants to be left out
You can't leave, 'cause your heart is there
But you can't stay, 'cause you been somewhere else
You can't cry, 'cause you'll look broke down
But you're cryin' anyway 'cause you're all broke down

It's a family affair
It's a family affair



The lyrics alone don't convey the (to me) heartfelt feeling in the song. It trumps an awful lot of what passes for r & b or 'soul' in today's charts, where bellowing or vibrato off the Richter Scale seems to have been substituted for genuine emotion.

Let's take a look at that sneerin' missive 'de haut en bas', 'Dance To The Music':

Sing, get up and dance to the music
Get on up and dance to the music

Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music

Hey Greg!
What?
All we need is a drummer, for people who only need a beat
I'm gonna add a little guitar and make it easy to move your feet
I'm gonna add some bottom, so that the dancers just won't hide
You might like to hear my organ
I said ride, Sally, ride
You might like to hear the horns blowin'
Cynthia on the throne, yeah

Cynthia and Jerry got a message they're sayin'
All the squares, go home

Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music
Dance to the Music...

Mmm. That's pozzitiverly Olympian in its crushing condescension, ain't it ?



As for being an earnest, kind, humble man- not many creative artists qualify as humanitarians of the year. Not Mozart, Bach, Wagner, Van Gogh, the ghastly Gallaghers or legend in his own living room, Bono. I can't recall it being a requirement in the 'wunderkind' job description...

Anyway, wouldn't the generation before you have been, I dunno, Genesis-style prog rockers or disco or pub rock or something? I don't mean an entire, proper generation, man.

Err, no. I'm 44 this year. My teenage years were spent grooving to Donna Summer & Giorgio Moroder, Eno, Talking Heads, Patti Smith, Harold Budd, Kraftwerk, Bowie, the Banshees et cetera, as well as Breton and Irish folk.

I didn't much care for a lot of prog rock, or Led Zep or Deep Purple though. Tedious decade long guitar solos, pointless unattributed retreads of American blues classics or Rick Wakeman farting into banks of synths whilst Jon Anderson plates a wood nymph fellating Merlin at the court of Henry VIII, on a journey to the centre of a denim clad Tartarus.... .:vom:

Scabrous Birdseed
10-02-2007, 14:38:40
See! You do dislike the music that was hip from right before you became interested in music! QED.

Isn't Family Affair's basic message "everyone sucks"? That's how I've percieved it. A cold, distant look at human social life. In the course of those two verses he manages to diss (a) thugs, (b) normal kids, (c) mothers, (d) the institution of the family, (e) love, (f) emotionality, (g) keeping up appearances.

Dance to the music, on the other hand, is only nasty to "people who only need a beat" and "squares", so I guess that's okay. Note, however, that the man can't even write a song about music without a couple of snide, condescending comments.

Lazarus and the Gimp
10-02-2007, 15:33:23
That's just plain bonkers, Scabby.

Funko
12-02-2007, 09:00:36
Originally posted by Eklektikos
Kerbdog had another album apart from On The Turn? :eek:

Their eponymous debut. It's heavier, less poppy good though.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kerbdog_(album)

Seems to be completely unavailable now but download End of Green, Dry Riser, Dummy Crusher to get an idea. Or PM me if you can't find it...

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-02-2007, 10:22:02
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
See! You do dislike the music that was hip from right before you became interested in music! QED.

Isn't Family Affair's basic message "everyone sucks"? That's how I've percieved it. A cold, distant look at human social life. In the course of those two verses he manages to diss (a) thugs, (b) normal kids, (c) mothers, (d) the institution of the family, (e) love, (f) emotionality, (g) keeping up appearances.

Dance to the music, on the other hand, is only nasty to "people who only need a beat" and "squares", so I guess that's okay. Note, however, that the man can't even write a song about music without a couple of snide, condescending comments.


Sorry, but you appear to have 'issues', as Oprah would put it, with Sly and the Family Stone.

Your interpretation of his lyrics is so far removed from any other intelligent analysis of his music or similar music of his time, that I can only conclude you once were hit over the head with a large watermelon and associate it with Sly Stone's 'Watermelon Man'...

He led a truly integrated group- men, women, black and white, at a time when this was hardly a popular thing to do, in a country at war with itself. One has to wonder just how condescending you think he was being, and to whom- especially when he records songs such as:

'Everyday People'

'You Can Make It If You Try'

'Don't Call Me Nigger Whitey'

and that epic of true Apollonian hauteur and aristocratic disdain:

'Everybody Is A Star'.

Scabrous Birdseed
17-02-2007, 11:31:11
Originally posted by Fergus & The Brazen Car
He led a truly integrated group- men, women, black and white, at a time when this was hardly a popular thing to do

Ah but it was. Sly was a fucking (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZQhLfgV9lc) hippie (http://snipurl.com/1aikh), you see. Fucking Hippie bands usually included some token racial or gender mixing, cf. Jimi Henrix, Arthur Lee, Janis Joplin.

In that context his lyrical content is unsurprising, I think, as it ties into an angry, sneering "counterculture" tradition with Sanders/Kupfenberg, Zappa, George Carlin et al which was all around at the time. There's a scary undercurrent of unpleasant, seething aggro underneath the flower power pleasantries.

Sly's music may not have been the same as the mainstream of the movement's*, but the sentiments were there. Sneering and all.

--- --- ---

* It was not, of course, "his" music he'd grown up with. He was upper-middle-class and had mostly white friends. Thus it places itself in the same musical tradition as, say, India Arie of hegemonically absorbed house niggers trying to recapture their lost blackness by being more "genuine" than their contemporaries.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-02-2007, 15:39:35
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed


* It was not, of course, "his" music he'd grown up with. He was upper-middle-class and had mostly white friends. Thus it places itself in the same musical tradition as, say, India Arie of hegemonically absorbed house niggers trying to recapture their lost blackness by being more "genuine" than their contemporaries.


What a load of patronising old bollocks.


You need to stop smoking burning linoleum.

Drekkus
19-02-2007, 09:19:49
Sly Stone is God!! 'If you want me to stay' is about the best song ever.

Diss
07-03-2007, 07:33:50
I think 1990 was a great year- for metal at least. The only thing lacking was a Metallica album.

1994 looked pretty cool. I enjoyed Smash, superunkown, and downward spiral.

Diss
07-03-2007, 07:48:33
okay I had to research a little. But 1986 was a great year. About the year I started getting into heavier stuff.

Metallica- Master of Puppets
Slayer- Reign in Blood
Iron Maiden- Somewhere in Time
Megadeth- Peace Sells... But who's buyin'
Metal Church- The Dark

but then I look at 1988- an even better year.
Metallica- And Justice For All
Iron Maiden- Seventh Son of a Seventh sun (great concept album)
Slayer- South of Heaven
Helloween- Keeper of the Seven Keys part I
Queensryche- Operation Mindcrime
Megadeth- So Far...So Good... So What
Manowar- Kings of Metal
Anthrax- state of euphoria

1990 for those who care about metal
Slayer- Seasons in the Abyss
Megadeth- Rust in Peace
Pantera- Cowboys from Hell
Anthrax- Persistance of time
queensryche- empire
testament- souls of black
prong- beg to differ
primus- fizzle fry

Diss
07-03-2007, 07:53:36
more good albums from 1994 for metal fans

Megadeth- Youthanasia
Slayer- Divine Intervention
Pantera- Far Beyond Driven
Korn- Korn
Prong- Cleansing

Diss
07-03-2007, 07:59:30
Originally posted by Greg W
Oooh, I may have to disagree with myself here. MMM (my radio station) had a thing tonight about albums that were 30 years old this year. And boy was 1977 (http://www.oldielyrics.com/1977.html) a good year for albums...
10CC - Deceptive Bends
ABBA - ABBA the album
AC/DC - Let There Be Rock
Bee Gees - Saturday Night Fever (and Here At Last)
Billy Joel - The Stranger
Boney M - Love for Sale
Cat Stevens - Izitso
Chicago - Chicago XI
David Bowie - Heroes (and Low)
Elvis - Moody Blue
Eric Clapton - Slowhand
Fleetwood Mac - Rumours
Foreigner - Foreigner
Iggy Pop - Lust for Life (and The Idiot)
Judas Priest - Sin After Sin
Meatloaf - Bat out of Hell
Motorhead - Motorhead
Queen - News of the World
Rod Stewart - Footloose and Fancy Free
Santana - Moonflower
Status Quo - Rockin all Over the World
The Sex Pistols - Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols

And that's just the albums I have heard of. There's some damned fine albums in that lot.

Scorpions- Taken By Force
Black Sabbath- okay I didn't like them that much at this point, but I'll mention them

Drekkus
11-05-2007, 16:07:53
Originally posted by Drekkus
Sly Stone is God!! 'If you want me to stay' is about the best song ever. Sly & the Family Stone are coming to the North Sea jazz festival in Rotterdam this july!!! :bounce: :bounce: :beer: :beer: I will be there!!

C.G.B. Spender
11-05-2007, 16:11:28
1973, for no reason

Foetus
13-05-2007, 21:13:38
Adding to 1994, you've missed Release by Cop Shoot Cop.

Oh, but I'll go with 1986 for the aforementioned reasons. And the fact I was 16.