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Drekkus
22-09-2006, 08:58:09
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yk3dZjIEzyk

Drekkus
22-09-2006, 09:01:21
why did a write an SUV, and not a SUV? :(

mr_G
22-09-2006, 09:02:40
best sentence EVAH!!!!

Funko
22-09-2006, 09:03:14
:lol:

Kitsuki
22-09-2006, 09:18:10
:lol:

Funko
22-09-2006, 09:22:57
an SUV is correct anyway.

mr_G
22-09-2006, 09:37:16
why?

Mr. Bas
22-09-2006, 09:47:39
own goal

an es-u-vee

mr_G
22-09-2006, 09:51:02
ass u vee

ok

Resource Consumer
22-09-2006, 10:00:24
hum-vee?

mr_G
22-09-2006, 10:01:31
Originally posted by Mr. Bas
own goal

an es-u-vee own goal in your trousers jesjes

Venom
22-09-2006, 12:39:45
This is an brilliant thread.

Greg W
22-09-2006, 13:30:22
Oddly enough:

Who owns an SUV?
Who owns a Sports Utility Vehicle?

Both sound correct. Stupid bloody language. :clueless:

mr_G
22-09-2006, 13:41:33
Originally posted by Venom
This is an brilliant thread. and so is i

Kitsuki
22-09-2006, 13:43:31
You are a thread?

mr_G
22-09-2006, 13:47:29
nono i is a thread

Oerdin
22-09-2006, 17:39:21
Originally posted by Greg W
Oddly enough:

Who owns an SUV?
Who owns a Sports Utility Vehicle?

Both sound correct. Stupid bloody language. :clueless:

I believe you'd use an when the noun begins with a vowel and a when it does not.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
22-09-2006, 18:53:49
And the first word is assuvee. An assuvee.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
22-09-2006, 18:54:16
Originally posted by mr_G
nono i is a thread

A thread is you!

Provost Harrison
22-09-2006, 21:24:41
Originally posted by Oerdin
I believe you'd use an when the noun begins with a vowel and a when it does not.

Yeah, it's a fairly straightforward rule of English...I am just trying to think of an awkward exception though, although none spring to mind ;)

Greg W
22-09-2006, 23:34:19
Originally posted by Oerdin
I believe you'd use an when the noun begins with a vowel and a when it does not. That would be the American usage. Which, like the rest of your mangling of the language, is not entirely incorrect. :cute:Kenneth G. Wilson (1923). The Columbia Guide to Standard American English. 1993.

a, an (determiner, art., adj.)


Choose a or an according to what sounds right, and you will almost certainly be correct: most variations are Standard English. Americans usually use a (pronounced uh when unstressed) before words beginning with consonant sounds, as in a dog, and an (pronounced uhn or occasionally an, especially at higher levels of speech) before words beginning with vowel sounds, as in an apple. But when a and an receive heavier stress than the nouns they precede, as in a boy, not two boys, and an army, not several armies, they rhyme with day and can, respectively. Atypical and Nonstandard is any use of a with words beginning with a vowel sound. Using an before words spelled with initial vowels but pronounced beginning with consonant sounds, as in an union, is rare and may seem affected.

Use of a and an varies before words beginning with h-. When the h is silent as in honor, use an; when it is always sounded, as in horror, use a. When a spoken h is sounded in one context but not in another, as with hysterical, use either a (uh his-TER-i-kuhl WIT-nes) or an (an is-TER-i-kuhl WIT-nes); Edited English requires a rather than an, regardless of which way readers might pronounce it aloud. When the sound of initial h- is in divided usage, as in herb, use either an UHRB or uh HUHRB, depending on your pronunciation of the noun.Which would explain why "an SUV" sounds more correct than "a SUV". Because the "S" is pronounced "ess", it sounds like it starts with a vowel, and thus it is appropriate to say "an" rather than "a". ;)

Greg W
22-09-2006, 23:37:30
And that's not to mention this, which gives more concrete examples:A and An

The word a is often referred to as the indefinite article. The indefinite article has two forms: a and an. The form a is used before words which begin with a consonant sound.
e.g. a broom
a garage
a green apple

As well as being used before words beginning with consonants, a is also used before words which begin with vowels, but which are pronounced with an initial consonant sound. For instance, a is used before words beginning with eu and words beginning with a long u, since these words are pronounced with an initial y sound. A is also used before the word one, since one is pronounced with an initial w sound.
e.g. a euphonium
a utensil
a one-way street

As was mentioned in Chapter 3, a vowel followed by a single consonant, followed by another vowel, is usually pronounced long. A is used before the following words which begin with a long u:


ubiquitous unanimous
unicorn unification
unified uniform
union unique
unison unit
united university
uranium use
useful useless
usual usurper
utensil utility
Utopia


The word an is used before words beginning with a vowel sound.
e.g. an apple
an old broom
an umbrella
an hour

As well as being used before words beginning with vowels, an is also used before the following words which begin with a silent h:

heir
heirloom
honest
honor
honorable
honorarium
honorary
honorific
hour
hourglass
hourly

See Exercise 1.



3. The use of A and An before singular countable nouns

In many languages, the word for a is the same as the word for one. This was also formerly the case in English. Because of the association of a and an with the idea of one, a and an are usually used only with singular countable nouns.

a. A weakened form of One
A or an frequently has the meaning of a weakened form of one.
e.g. I would like a cup of tea.
A car is parked in front of the house.
The child owns a bicycle.

b. Naming a profession
When a sentence such as the following is used to name someone's profession, a or an must precede the name of the profession.
e.g. She is an artist.
He is a student.

c. Making a general statement
A is referred to as the indefinite article because it can be used to refer to something in general terms. A and an are often used in general statements.
e.g. A bank account can provide a good means of saving money.
An accountant must have a good knowledge of arithmetic.
A good pair of scissors should be used for cutting cloth.

d. Referring to something not mentioned before
In dialogue and descriptions, a and an are used with nouns that name something which has not been referred to previously.
e.g. Where can I find a telephone?
Suddenly we heard an eerie sound.
All at once a moose appeared in front of us.
In these examples, it is assumed that the things referred to by the nouns telephone, sound and moose have not been referred to previously.

e. A or An with the meaning of Per
A or an can also be used with the meaning of per.
e.g. once a week
two dollars a dozen
four times a year
In these examples, a has the meaning of per. For instance, once a week means once per week, and two dollars a dozen means two dollars per dozen.

Funko
23-09-2006, 09:17:43
I think Drekkes started this thread with the exact purpose of pointing out this weird rule in the english language. Pretty clever.

Greg W
23-09-2006, 09:33:13
Or not. :D

Funko
23-09-2006, 10:16:27
Greg the new dorkstar

Greg W
24-09-2006, 00:53:09
If I hadn't cut and pasted the whole thing, I'd be tempted to agree with you. :o

C.G.B. Spender
24-09-2006, 08:21:45
An lame excuse

Funko
24-09-2006, 10:11:14
Ann?