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Lazarus and the Gimp
23-05-2006, 19:43:42
Preferably not the hippyish wank variety. I'm more into stuff with lots of local history, written by someone who can spin a good yarn.

John Gimlette is my favourite. Absolutely masses of gob-smacking and lurid history, all dished out with flashes of tinder-dry wit.

jsorense
23-05-2006, 19:58:11
Have you read In A Sunburned Country, (2001), by Bill Bryson?

Lazarus and the Gimp
24-05-2006, 21:31:02
The problem with Bryson is that his travel writing is mostly about Bill Bryson. I can take him in small doses, but he gets on my nerves.

Venom
24-05-2006, 21:37:48
Recommending a history book to you, that you will like, is like trying to recommend a good porno to Ron Jeremy.

MOBIUS
24-05-2006, 22:12:20
Well you've got to tell us where the fuck you're going if we're going to provide you with local history recommendations

DaShi
24-05-2006, 22:13:15
Bridges of Madison County?

BigGameHunter
25-05-2006, 04:54:46
Well...here I go being Oregoncentric again, but this is by the guy with the unpronounceable last name who brought you "Fight Club"...you may want to visit here after you read it and I will offer you a couch or a garden shed to stay in if you do:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1400047838/104-2960157-6710312?v=glance&n=283155

Funko
25-05-2006, 08:19:10
Originally posted by MOBIUS
Well you've got to tell us where the fuck you're going if we're going to provide you with local history recommendations

Why does he have to be going somewhere?

jsorense
25-05-2006, 16:24:34
You're welcome Laz.:hmm:

The Snow Leopard (1978)
by Peter Matthiessen

Lazarus and the Gimp
25-05-2006, 16:42:34
Originally posted by Venom
Recommending a history book to you, that you will like, is like trying to recommend a good porno to Ron Jeremy. .

I'm after travel literature, not history books.

Lazarus and the Gimp
25-05-2006, 16:44:07
Originally posted by MOBIUS
Well you've got to tell us where the fuck you're going if we're going to provide you with local history recommendations

I'm going to Tescos later, if that's any help.

I'm after travel literature, not a guide-book.

Venom
25-05-2006, 18:04:17
Oh, well I'm not allowed out of the state anymore so I can't help with anything travel related.

paiktis22
25-05-2006, 19:18:24
if you can stomach endless meticulous descriptions of how things were 2.000 years ago

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/014044226X/qid=1148584601/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/104-8477462-3673551?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

personally i find it boring to be honest. but it can be interesting if you're into travelling guides. this one's very old!

MOBIUS
25-05-2006, 21:38:18
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
I'm going to Tescos later, if that's any help.

I'm after travel literature, not a guide-book.

You said local history, though I suppose I could recommend you some books about the history of Tescos or whatever...

I usually find it adds an extra dimesion to read something interesting about the place you're visiting in an historical context.:cute:

Lazarus and the Gimp
25-05-2006, 21:42:09
You can visit things in a historical context, Time Lord?

MOBIUS
26-05-2006, 01:05:18
You know what I mean, you pedantic grammar nazi...:p

When I went to the Alhambra, I read The Alhambra by Washington Irving; in Prague I bought The Good Soldier _vejk by Jaroslav Hasek etc.

Hence if you want 'travel literature' recommended 'with lots of local history', it usually requires knowledge of said travel destination.

Immortal Wombat
26-05-2006, 02:08:28
'Travel literature with lots of local history' is still meaningful even when the locality is unspecified. You can recommend books about a variety of places. :idea:

The Snow Leopard is a great book, though it probably comes under hippyish wank.

King_Ghidra
26-05-2006, 08:05:24
How about 'travels with my aunt' by graham greene. not read it myself, but it appears to be highly regarded, and greene is the daddy

Nills Lagerbaak
26-05-2006, 08:37:35
Try a friend of ours - Roger King, his book "A girl from Zanzibar" . could be a little too novelly, but good local knowledge.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
01-07-2006, 09:23:15
Robert Byron: The Road to Oxiana

Jonathan Raban: Old Glory

Ibn Battuta: Travels In Asia and Africa, 1325-1345

Anthony Smith: Blind White Fish In Persia

Isabelle Eberhardt: Nomad: The Diaries of...

The Travels of Sir John Mandeville (Penguin Classics)

Lesley Blanch: The Wilder Shores of Love: The Exotic True-Life Stories of Isabel Burton, Aimee Dubucq de Rivery, Jane Digby, and Isabelle Eberhardt

Dr. Johnson: Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland & Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides



" The farther behind I leave the past, the closer I am to forging my own character. "

Isabelle Eberhardt

Scabrous Birdseed
02-07-2006, 10:15:02
At the risk of being all F&TBC-like and recommending stuff that pops into my brain without even glancing at the original specification,

"Exterminate all the brutes" by Sven Lindqvist. A travel book, a piece of literary criticism and an excellent analysis of the colonial roots of genocide in one. It's also totally grim and though excellently written by no means a good yarn, which means it's nothing like what you were asking for. :)

At least he's not a hippie.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
03-07-2006, 10:33:20
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
At the risk of being all F&TBC-like and recommending stuff that pops into my brain without even glancing at the original specification,



Gosh, sarky for a turnip, ain't ya ?


Now which of my recommendations did you have in mind ?


Isabelle Eberhardt lived and died in North Africa; Ibn Battuta was a Moroccan and visited every country in Dar al Islam- his personality shines through in his work.

Robert Byron spins a good yarn, his work is replete with local colour. Raban has a good outsider's view of the Mississippi and so on and so on...


If you're going to nitpick, don't bring a toothless comb.

Scabrous Birdseed
05-07-2006, 10:13:22
Actually I'm reading the Lindqvist book again (this reminded me of it) and it is a good yarn and full of eye-boggling local history. Warmly recommended.

(Hope this is the book that breaks the curse of "Scabby Recommending Stuff to Laz")

Lazarus and the Gimp
05-07-2006, 20:38:53
I've still not forgiven you for "The Long Ships".

Immortal Wombat
06-07-2006, 10:33:49
Seriously, the Travels of Sir "didn't really exist" John "make shit up as you go along" Mandeville? Yarns hadn't even been invented when that was written.

Immortal Wombat
06-07-2006, 10:35:22
(for example)

Fergus & The Brazen Car
08-07-2006, 09:04:05
Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
Seriously, the Travels of Sir "didn't really exist" John "make shit up as you go along" Mandeville? Yarns hadn't even been invented when that was written.


I thought knowing Laz's interests that the (tall) Tales of Sir John would prove of interest to him and would make a fine contrast and comparison with the genuine travels of Ibn Battuta.


I understand now that on this site such kinds of considerate thought are a rara avis, akin to the roc, phoenix or golden goose.


Next time anyone asks for travel literature I'll recommend 'A Year In Provence' or 'Judith Chalmers: Be Your Own Breakfast Lookie-Likie- Where To Get Skin Like Grapefruit & Hair Like Shredded Wheat."

Noisy
08-07-2006, 11:23:13
There's a good Danish writer who's written a series of travel books about his journeys in Russia. None of your nancying about on a bicycle or in a Trabant: used a Panzer, as I remember. 'Wheels of Terror'; 'March Battalion'; 'OGPU Prison' come to mind. Sven Hassel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sven_Hassel).

TCO
09-07-2006, 12:43:49
RVC Bodley WINDS OF THE SAHARA
?author WALKING ACCROSS AMERICA
Peter S. Beagle I SEE BY MY OUTFIT
? IMPERIAL GRUNTS

BigGameHunter
09-07-2006, 20:06:15
Not travel lit per se, but hilarious.
"The River Why" by David James Duncan.

Japher
10-07-2006, 18:49:14
what's Travel Literature?

Fergus & The Brazen Car
11-07-2006, 08:53:38
Originally posted by Japher
what's Travel Literature?


What an American writes about their terrible experience of getting out of the car and walking to a shop.


;)

Japher
12-07-2006, 16:32:35
walking?

Fergus & The Brazen Car
15-07-2006, 09:02:26
Originally posted by Japher
walking?


Well 'undulating in a slug-like fashion' or 'encouraging your rolls of lard to shimmy rhythmically' would have sounded rude.


There's a very good passage in one of Bill Bryson's books about his return to the U.S.A. and how pedestrianization of a downtown shopping area had a negative impact on sales and shops.

If I can recall the book it's in I'll let you know.

TCO
16-07-2006, 18:44:57
You shoulda heard my Euro relatives moan when I marched them around the D.C. Mall to different museums and monuments. At the end of the day, the demanded a taxi ride back to the car (which was only 1.5 miles away.)

Japher
17-07-2006, 14:52:09
"Don't Stop the Carnival" is a good fiction about an American who attempts to start a hotel in a made up fictional caribbean island, set in the 1920s-30s. It draws on a lot of cliche's, myths, and attractions that can be found through the islands and puts them into one spot. It's a good quick read by Herman Wouk who wrote "War and Remembrance". Not exactly what you are looking for, but I just thought I'd add something to this thread.

TCO
18-07-2006, 02:46:34
Dude: WINDS OF THE SAHARA.

MoSe
07-08-2006, 12:29:29
Laz, I recently enjoyed "The Sheltering Sky", although I'm afraid it would only loosely fit in your target....

TCO
11-09-2006, 03:59:31
Dude:Winds of the Sahara. It's better then 7 Pillars of Wisdom. Way less pages, more plot and character and interesting things, and despite that more insights.