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*End Is Forever*
04-01-2006, 14:09:38
I should know better than to ask for help here, but ah well...

My job is looking a little insecure at the moment, and it has been so long since I used my CV that I tore it up and started from scratch. Any advice greatly appreciated - this is just the bare bones. Don't laugh too hard. :smoke:

It is currently tailored to a graduate marketing job (no, not marketing graduates) I was looking at not long ago.

Clickety-click (http://www.iainlindley.com/iainlindleycv.doc)

King_Ghidra
04-01-2006, 14:13:10
after a quick look:

i like it, brief and to the point, no bullshit (apart from a little in the opening paragraph, but that seems to be standard on the cv's i get these days).

if anything you might even want a tad more detail on some of your past roles to bring out the skills you used and the things you did a bit more

*End Is Forever*
04-01-2006, 14:18:24
I was wondering whether to go further back in my employment history (that is, one or more of the jobs I had as a student), because of those three roles there only one is a genuine full-time job (and they are all concurrent).

My work at Salford Young Peoples' University (it's a summer school) might be worth adding as it was a position of responsibility - looking after and mentoring groups of 20 or so children for a week at a time. On the other hand it was only 6 weeks work over two summers, and it was quite a while ago.

Funko
04-01-2006, 14:19:01
I agree with K_G.

If it's for graduate roles shouldn't you include some stuff about what you did in your degree?

*End Is Forever*
04-01-2006, 14:22:11
Originally posted by Funko
If it's for graduate roles shouldn't you include some stuff about what you did in your degree?

Yeah, probably, but I wasn't entirely sure what to put, and my work experience was far more directly relevent to the position I drew up the CV for.

Funko
04-01-2006, 14:33:19
It's a long time since I did mine but relevant then was loads of programming stuff, other computer skills, presentation skills, group projects (ie. teamwork), etc.

Basically anything that was potentially useful in a real job (depending on the job) rather than just academic study.

*End Is Forever*
04-01-2006, 14:40:32
You evidently did a useful degree... ;)

Japher
04-01-2006, 14:41:31
I'd change the name

to something like Cock Sucker, it's catchy!;)

sorry

this thread was too serious

Funko
04-01-2006, 14:44:04
Originally posted by *End Is Forever*
You evidently did a useful degree... ;)

None of this pointless arts wank. ;)

Aredhran
04-01-2006, 15:36:20
If you're going to send it electronically, make that a PDF.

In Switzerland, employers like to have a bit more on the personal details stuff, but UK might be different I don't know.

You should emphasize anything you did in previous jobs (even if they were part-time, summer jobs, or whatever) if it's related or could prove an asset in the position you're going for.

Zopperoni
04-01-2006, 16:04:15
Originally posted by *End Is Forever*
I was wondering whether to go further back in my employment history (that is, one or more of the jobs I had as a student), because of those three roles there only one is a genuine full-time job (and they are all concurrent).
Go with what you think is relevant. To make it clear to the reader what was a full-time job and what wasn't, you could add the number of hours you spent on each activity.
I have no idea how good those University marks you posted are, but if it's lower than expected/required, you can always use the extra-curricular activities as an explanation to why your marks may be lower.

You also might want to add some more details on skills/competences, such as MS Office skills, mastering a language other than English, or the possession of a driver's license.

Japher
04-01-2006, 16:13:10
I know that some place don't like you to list your skills or abilities but like you to show, in your CV, things you did that used certain skills.

Just from the first job listed;

Experience in media liaison, including regional and national media.

How? What did you do that gave you that experience.

responsible for devising and implementing effective, co-ordinated local campaigns using a variety of methods within strictly defined budgets and timescales.

First, you use the word "effective" way to much. Sometime you can use the word efficient, which also indicates time management, coupled with "goal oriented" or "goal driven". With the above bullet I would embellish on the "methods", possibly working in a way to emphasize that you were able to execute some methods that you were familiar with before they were required as well as successfully executing newer methods (shows you can learn).

Lazarus and the Gimp
04-01-2006, 20:19:42
For a marketing job (depending on the role) it's worth homing in on your experiences with sales or relationship-building.

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 02:02:09
Either make it one page or make it two full pages but not 1.5 pages. Also change your format as that one just doesn't cut it.

There are two types of resumes the first puts an emphasis on experience and the second concentrates on skills. Since you are a recent graduate you should focus on a skills based resume. Center your name and contact info at the top (name in large bold print), below that put your objective (Something like "To obtain a responsible position as a Staff Geologist where my experience, accomplishments, and strong science background can be effectively utilized to contribute to company profits." only changed around for the job you are seeking), then list 4-6 relavent skills (things like your degree, professional qualifications, and things relavent to the job you are seeking), next experience but only the experience which is relavent to the job you want to get, and lastly put your education and membership in professional organizations.

Leave off information like your age, religion, and other personal stuff. It won't help and might be a mark against you. You don't need hobbies either since that isn't useful at this stage. Remember they see hundreds of these things so you want it to be short and sweet concentrating only on why you would be good for the job you're applying for. Lately, make sure you individualize the objective section specifically for the job you are applying for. Hope that helps.

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 02:06:52
http://www.savefile.com/files/7518754

Here's my resume as an example. It's about 2 months out of date and doesn't show my current job but you should get the picture.

King_Ghidra
05-01-2006, 09:18:19
Oerdin, you're a funny guy:

Details orientated, dependable, & articulate

Collected rent payments, wrote ads for vacant units, showed properties to perspective tenets

i guess spellcheckers can only do so much :lol:

Funko
05-01-2006, 09:20:19
:lol:

I don't know if it's a cultural difference thing but I like Iain's format a lot more than Oerdin's.

King_Ghidra
05-01-2006, 09:21:58
ditto

Kitsuki
05-01-2006, 10:08:45
Yeah.

From all of the careers courses etc I went to in third year a lot of emphasis is placed on extra-curricular activities for graduate jobs in the UK, in order to differentiate between graduates.

The trick is to make those things seem relevant and/or useful to the job at hand.

Nav
05-01-2006, 10:10:08
Originally posted by Aredhran
If you're going to send it electronically, make that a PDF. Disagree, in office environments people are more likely to have Word than Acrobat (despite the latter being free).

Kitsuki
05-01-2006, 10:12:44
Word is easier to open and close documents over and over again. On the sub-standard PCs most companies have it takes ages to open Acrobat, and that normally pisses me off when I'm in a hurry to do something.

Zopperoni
05-01-2006, 10:17:01
Try the Acrobat Reader speed-up:

http://www.tnk-bootblock.co.uk/prods/misc/index.php (first item)

Scabrous Birdseed
05-01-2006, 10:49:24
Oerdin also managed to spell "geology" wrong in the file name. :D

I guess it's quite interesting how different CVs are expected to be from country to country. Here, for instance, hobbies and side activities are considered positive, not detrimental to a CV. Plus that cover-letter type stuff is meant to go in the cover letter, the CV is meant to be a pure list of accomplishments. And there's no set organisation.

For comparison here's my latest CV, which I worked quite a lot on:

http://www.savefile.com/files.php?fid=4235707

It's in Swedish, of course, but the headings are:

Education
Relevant employment and work experience
Relevant voluntary and hobby activities
Possibly interesting voluntary and hobby activities
Languages
Interests
Reference
Contact information

Each briefly annotated with a description of the skills required and acquired. I nicked that idea off the anglo-saxon idea of a CV.

Scabrous Birdseed
05-01-2006, 10:50:22
Note I've got nouse, poly, Jeopardy! and even CG in there.

Funko
05-01-2006, 10:54:09
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Here, for instance, hobbies and side activities are considered positive, not detrimental to a CV.

Here too but it also depends on relevance I think. This is just my opinion but there's no point having side activities like "reading books and watching films" but I've got stuff like organising gigs, writing reviews etc. to put on my CV that illustrate leadership and communication skills that are complimentary to the skills in my work experience.

Scabrous Birdseed
05-01-2006, 10:59:59
Well, looking for a job as a journalist obviously all the student journalism stuff will be relevant. That's almost a full page by itself.

Zopperoni
05-01-2006, 11:05:04
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
For comparison here's my latest CV, which I worked quite a lot on:
It's quite long. Perhaps you could fit it on two pages.

Is it common in Sweden to use chronological order instead of anti-chronological order?

Funko
05-01-2006, 11:05:12
Yes, exactly. I was just being a bit MoSe about your sentence.

Nav
05-01-2006, 11:08:17
anti-chronological (is that a drug?!)

Be sure to mention Counterglow in there somewhere, that's sure to get you the job!

Zopperoni
05-01-2006, 11:19:16
Originally posted by Nav
anti-chronological (is that a drug?!)
It gives the patient the impression that s/he can travel back in time.

Scabrous Birdseed
05-01-2006, 11:27:21
Originally posted by Zopperoni
Is it common in Sweden to use chronological order instead of anti-chronological order?

It's practically compulsory. I've only ever seen it done that way.

I've had different advice as to what length a CV should be (from "Make it as long as you possibly can!" to "one page, no fluff"), but since most of the truly relevant stuff will be in the cover letter anyway I say it should be essentially a reference encyclopedia. Note that in two pages I fit about five times the amount of stuff Iain fits into one.

Funko
05-01-2006, 11:30:16
Weird. Here it's definitely normally most recent at the top. You might change it if something less recent was more relevant though.

Zopperoni
05-01-2006, 12:32:39
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
I've had different advice as to what length a CV should be (from "Make it as long as you possibly can!" to "one page, no fluff"), but since most of the truly relevant stuff will be in the cover letter anyway I say it should be essentially a reference encyclopedia. Note that in two pages I fit about five times the amount of stuff Iain fits into one.
Truesay :)

Over here, it's common to use a two-page layout. The exception is when one has a long list of publications, which can be listed from page three onwards.

Come to think of it, I need to modify my CV soon to replace workshops/masterclasses with publications...

Nav
05-01-2006, 14:02:17
I've always gone for a one page CV. Most people like it. Just it's been getting harder and harder to keep it to one page, lots of tight editing required.

Noticed that the opening para has a few 'fragments (consider revising)' green underlines. Would be best to avoid those as it is distracting to anyone who opens it.

Oh and i never include personal interests, IMO that can wait for the interview stage. Maybe without that you can get it down to one page? ;)

Japher
05-01-2006, 14:14:30
I do a two page CV, but I put all relevant and eye catching information on the first page

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 14:22:49
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Oerdin, you're a funny guy:





i guess spellcheckers can only do so much :lol:

Those sentences where actually spelled correctly. Not sure what you're getting at but I suspect this is another example of English people not spelling things correctly.

Perspective vs prospective is what you are getting at I guess. Going to dictionary.com one of the many definations for perspective is "seeable or to aid in seeing" which seems to work in that sentence. Prospective is likely a better choice though it seems they both work.

King_Ghidra
05-01-2006, 14:26:17
Those sentences where actually spelled correctly. unlike that one huh

:lol: you are seriously killing me now

anyway just to be clear, i'm sure you meant prospective tenants

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 14:28:16
Please see edit which was cross posted.

King_Ghidra
05-01-2006, 14:30:37
here's a hint, don't use dictionary.com as a guide for correct usage of words

you are completely wrong, back down and walk away with some dignity intact

Funko
05-01-2006, 14:32:04
It's definitely prospective tenants.


You spelt both perspective and tenets correctly but neither were the word you meant, which is why K_G said the spell checker can only do so much.

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 14:43:24
OK.

MoSe
05-01-2006, 14:45:29
Originally posted by Funko
I was just being a bit MoSe ....
:eek:
:smoke:

Now, if you insist on antonomasizing me, I expect to become a glossary entry, finally

MoSe
05-01-2006, 15:05:19
Oerdin, I woldn't have been strict myself, I would have conceded that some minor acception of perspective would have been acceptable in place for prospective, but if KG is so sure I won't question him

What I wanted to say anyway, is that at first sight I read your words "perspective tenets" as "rules for drawing/representing objects in the distance" :)

so, when you say that you "showed properties to perspective tenets", that still makes sense!
You showed the properties while respecting the way the eye sees objects in the distance. This hints you master optics, architecture and have an artistic and harmonic sensibility for the disposition of objects in space
;)

Oerdin
05-01-2006, 15:07:24
Atleast the problem is solved. Though the puns will continue no doubt.

*End Is Forever*
05-01-2006, 15:55:34
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
For a marketing job (depending on the role) it's worth homing in on your experiences with sales or relationship-building.

The job in question is more of a publicity co-ordinator than a sales role. I felt my experience of campaign organisation was more relevent to the role.

Perspective tenets... :lol:

Thanks for your comments everyone.

Scabrous Birdseed
05-01-2006, 17:31:13
What about "geolgy" in the file name? :)

Immortal Wombat
05-01-2006, 19:18:05
/me puts Oerdin's, Scabby's and Iain's CV in a little line next to BGH's, TMM's, and PH's

Oerdin
06-01-2006, 00:21:20
The file name was assigned by the file hosting company when it was uploaded.

Oerdin
06-01-2006, 02:39:12
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
What about "geolgy" in the file name? :)

The file name when I download it is "~$hn Jackson Geolgy.doc" The file which I uploaded was "John Jackson Geology Resume.doc". Clearly there have been some changes to the file name made by the file host. Not that I'd complain since it is a free file hosting site.

Immortal Wombat
06-01-2006, 19:05:01
Probably obfuscated for your own protection.