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Greg W
18-11-2005, 05:30:51
And no, this is not yet another lame copycat/pun/joke attempt.

So... COOKING FORUM!?

Just a case of I cooked a Korma the other night. Yes, from scratch, with spices and stuff. I even had to use a mortar and pestle for the first time ever (in relation to cooking anyway). Only it wasn't particularly like any Korma that I had ever eaten before. It was very nice by all means, but I tend to equate Korma with creamy sauces, and this recipe wasn't quite that. No doubt I just got a particular variant, probably a northern/southern recipe, where I am used to the opposite. :confused:

Or something. I dunno, it's cooking. A subject (amongst many) that I am happy to confess that I know little about. :clueless:

However, I wouldn't mind experimenting, or figuring out how to make it more like what I have eaten before.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 07:38:04
Korma, Korma.... is that a bit like Schnitzel?

Greg W
18-11-2005, 08:29:49
You have schnitzel with creamy sauces? :eek:

It's an Indian curry. Just in case that's not a terrible own goal attempt, and you really don't know...

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 08:59:37
1. yes

2. aha, and what's special about it, why not just "curry"?

Funko
18-11-2005, 09:15:52
There are loads of different types of curry... we English have as many words for curry as the eskimos have for beer.

What was that recipe.

Greg W
18-11-2005, 09:16:12
Weird. Here a Schnitzel could have a creamy sauce added afterwards, but I would never describe a schnitzel as having any sauce really. A schnitzel is just a crumbed piece of meat. In basic terms anyway.

It's just a type of curry. Like the difference between a salami and a bratwurst. They're both sausages, but they both taste very different, have different recipes, etc.

Drekkus
18-11-2005, 09:18:07
Oh, young Greg, you have no knowledge of the wide and delicate world of the Schnitzel.

Greg W
18-11-2005, 09:23:05
That's allright. This is a thread about Korma. I think that Schnitzel deserves it's own thread. :nervous:

Funko
18-11-2005, 09:24:01
so what was the recipe? :bash:

Greg W
18-11-2005, 09:26:00
Oh, my recipe? Gimme a few mins, I'll get it and type it out.

Greg W
18-11-2005, 09:39:40
Take 1kg of diced lamb. Mix in 2 tblsp of thick plain yoghurt and set aside.

Dry roast (seperately) 1 tblsp of Coriander seeds, and 1 teasp Cumin seeds until aromatic. Grind into a fine powder in a mortar and pestle. Remove seeds from 5 Cardamom pods, and grind them.

Roughly chop one onion, and finely chop another. Place the roughly chopped onion, ground spices, 2 tblsp grated coconut, 1 tblsp white poppy seeds (khus khus), 3 green chillies, 4 cloves crushed garlic, 2 inch piece of ginger (grated), 25g cashew nuts, 6 cloves, 1/4 teasp cinnamon and 2/3 cup water into a food processor and process to a smooth paste.

Heat 2tblsp oil in a khakri/casserole dish (I used a large pot) and fry the finely chopped onion until lightly browned. Pour the blended mixture in, and heat for 1 minute, or until the liquid evaporates and the sauce thickens. Add the lamb with yoghurt, and slowly bring to the boil. Cover tightly and simmer for 1 & 1/2 hours, or until the meat is very tender, stirring occasionally.

Funko
18-11-2005, 09:44:00
That sounds nice. It's a relatively healthy version though.


You can use cream rather than yoghurt to make it more creamy...

Also, did your yoghurt separate? If you are using yoghurt you can mix it with some flour before heating and that will keep it thicker.

And don't forget that in restaurants etc. they use about 2.5 Kg of ghee (clarified butter) per serving.

Funko
18-11-2005, 09:47:44
Also I tend to associate kormas with almonds, cashews seems a little odd. So you could try swapping the cashews for almonds

Greg W
18-11-2005, 09:53:40
Yeah, it was very tasty, it just didn't seem like a Korma to me.

The way they described the thick ypghurt was to take 2 & 1/2 cups of milk, which were to be brought to boil in a saucepan, then allowed to cool to lukewarm. Stir in 2 tablespoons of plain thick yoghurt, cover and leave in a warm place for about 8 hours. I got lazy (well, more to the point I didn't have 8 hours), so I just threw in 2 tablespoons of plain thick yoghurt. Didn't seperate that I saw.

Thickness wasn't a big deal, in fact I added a little too much water cos I thought it was too thick. And of course when simmering, I ended up with too much liquid, so I had to allow it to simmer down a little.

Thanks, I may try the ghee/almonds idea.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:04:35
Originally posted by Funko
There are loads of different types of curry... we English have as many words for curry as the eskimos have for beer.


Dead Eskimos? Beer?

Btw, you have no Schnitzel culture, we have no curry culture. So thanks for getting the aussie bastard to finally explain his recipe. :D

mr.G
18-11-2005, 10:05:27
Auf Wiener Schitzel?

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:05:57
Auf?

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:12:33
Alf?

You don't have Indian restaurants in Germany? Damn, I may have to change my plans to visit Germany for WC2006. :cry:

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:13:21
What's Germany?

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:14:41
Yeah, nevermind me, blonde moment.

mr.G
18-11-2005, 10:14:47
Originally posted by Dyl Ulenspiegel
Auf? jesjes I thougt that was what you German or semi German people say instead of goodbye

heeeej duuuu
auf wiener schjitzzzel

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:21:16
Originally posted by Greg W

Thanks, I may try the ghee/almonds idea.

If it were me I'd go with cream/almonds and not use ghee...

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:21:30
"semi German people"

Dutch people?

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:21:50
Originally posted by Dyl Ulenspiegel
Btw, you have no Schnitzel culture, we have no curry culture

and the aussies have no culture! :beer:

Drekkus
18-11-2005, 10:22:08
I thought it was Auf Wieder Schnitzel

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:26:58
Originally posted by Funko
and the aussies have no culture! :beer:

Those bloody southern Eskimos! :beer:

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:27:10
Originally posted by Funko
and the aussies have no culture! :beer: What, budgie smugglers and throwing another shrimp on the barbie don't count? :cry:

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:27:42
Sorry. :(

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:29:53
God, you know the worst thing. I actually used the word shrimp. We're becoming so Americanised. :cry:

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:31:56
So much so that I thought you called them shrimps!

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:34:37
Originally posted by Drekkus
I thought it was Auf Wieder Schnitzel

There is lemon and raspberry jam auf a Wiener Schnitzel, and that's it.

mr.G
18-11-2005, 10:38:09
Originally posted by Drekkus
I thought it was Auf Wieder Schnitzel Auwjaaah Da was it

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:38:42
Now Dyl, where's your lemon curry recipe?

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:43:46
Lemon Schnitzel:

Slice a medium sized lemon
Put in flour, egg and bread crumbs
fry

Serve with lemon and raspberry jam

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:44:14
Originally posted by Funko
So much so that I thought you called them shrimps! Well, in fairness, in our advertising campaigns to the Yanks, we use the word Shrimp, so that they know what we're talking about. So maybe that filtered through to you lot as well.

I still feel ashamed though. :(

mr.G
18-11-2005, 10:44:58
yum yum
and then they say you austians can't cook.

fried lemon, mmmhmmmmhhhhmmmmmjam

Greg W
18-11-2005, 10:46:20
I don't want to know what they cook to make a weiner schnitzel. :eek:

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:48:39
wine

Funko
18-11-2005, 10:49:05
Someone from Vienna.

Drekkus
18-11-2005, 10:52:59
Oh, not those damn Whiner Schnitzels again, please. It's always the same with those bastards, complaining and complaining and complaining.

mr.G
18-11-2005, 10:54:22
:lol:

Dyl Ulenspiegel
18-11-2005, 10:59:48
Ok, Hamburger then.

Funko
18-11-2005, 11:00:05
Vinnie burger.