PDA

View Full Version : I'm feeling good.


Oerdin
24-09-2005, 23:05:39
I hadn't stopped by to see my old man in a while so I figured Saturday lunch was a great time to do it. I've always been something of an exotic food consieur while my father has always been a more traditional western style food eater (strange given we live in one of the most multicultural cities in America) so I decided to take him to a local high class Korean restaurant I know.

As always the food was great with BBQed and marinated pork & beef combined with a bit of rice and a million types of kimchee (including a rather good seaweed pepper kimchee). We decided to get a bottle of soju which turned into two or three bottles after we met a group of South Korean businessmen who were visiting California on business. Those Korean guys sure do like to drink.

After the third bottle of soju I decided to switch to OB Lager (a Korean beer which is inexpensive but far better then crap like Bud). It's now 3pm and I'm pretty fucked up. I'm glad my dad drove because I'd have hated to drive after we spent two hours hanging out with the Korean team of professional alcoholics.

protein
25-09-2005, 00:33:28
I've never eaten Korean food. I've never even seen a Korean restaurant. :(

I bet it's nice though. Is it a hybrid between Japanese and Chinese food? Does it have it's own regional style?

Can you mail me some? I'm hungry.

JM^3
25-09-2005, 00:41:14
it is different then Japanese or Chinese... I think

but similiar

maybe closer to Japanese?

JM

Oerdin
25-09-2005, 01:41:15
Korean food is very meat heavy compared to Chinese or especially Japanese food. Rice plays a much smaller role as well since Korea tends to have a climate like Germany instead of the typical steamy East Asian stereotype. Koreans are big on spices like garlic, pepper, onions, and rice vinegar. Soy also is important though the bulk of the food is made up of beef or pork, spiced veggie (lots of kimchee), sea food, and even things like barley or wheat. Rice is in most meals but it is often a side dish where as in other Asian countries it is THE dish (if you know what I mean). The Koreans use a fair amount of soups with wheat, barley, or rice noodles which is very different from Japanese or Chinese noodles (which use almost only rice flour).

Normally a meal will consist of tea and alcoholic drinks (Koreans love alcohol especially soju [fortified rice wine], beer [a result of the Japanese-German influence], or whiskey [American influence]) followed by appetizers like steamed & spiced chopped seaweed, radish kimchee (kimchee means it has been spiced and fermented and has a vinegary taste), soy and spinach, cabbage kimchee, fried tofu in teriyaki, various bean pastes, a jello like side dish, and a great many others

Then the main dish comes (usually with more soju as alcoholic drinks are so popular; these people love to drink and are like the Irish of East Asia) and typically consists of things like pork or beef spare ribs. Chopped pork or beef are main courses at virtually every Korean meal but some times seafood is served as a side dish or, in coastal areas like Jeju-do, in place of pork or beef when those are not available. Westerners, even westerners who dislike Chinese or Japanese food, should find Korean food to their liking. The prominence of meat along with wheat and barley makes the food familiar to westerners. Even if it is served with an Asian twist.

protein
25-09-2005, 01:48:29
hmm. sounds like i should give it a whirl.

there has to be somewhere in London.

I bet it is unbelievably expensive here.

Oerdin
25-09-2005, 02:33:22
Koreans have also taken up the Japanese traditon of BBQing meat at the table. That means each table has a small gas powered grill where each person grills his meat (or more exactly his wife/girlfriend cooks the meat while he waits for her to finish) and then people will pick it up with grape leaves. the last time I was in South Korea (I've been five times for a total of seven months) the UN had a international medical conference in Souel. I paid to go on a DMZ tour which included a tour of a traditional Korean villiage along with a lunch of traditional Korean food. There were women doctor's who had paid to go on the tour and who were highly ranked speakers at this medical convention yet they were expected to cook the food for all the men. This is a tour they paid to be on and which they knew no one! That should tell you a bit about east Asian feelings about where women sit in society.

Oerdin
25-09-2005, 02:34:21
Personally, I thought it was great that internationally recognized doctors were expected to cook my lunch for me. :D

"Cook my lunch, woman!"

protein
25-09-2005, 02:35:34
DMZ = demilitarized zone?

Oerdin
25-09-2005, 03:01:17
Of course.

Nills Lagerbaak
25-09-2005, 09:47:51
Originally posted by Oerdin
Koreans have also taken up the Japanese traditon of BBQing meat at the table. That means each table has a small gas powered grill where each person grills his meat (or more exactly his wife/girlfriend cooks the meat while he waits for her to finish) and then people will pick it up with grape leaves. the last time I was in South Korea (I've been five times for a total of seven months) the UN had a international medical conference in Souel. I paid to go on a DMZ tour which included a tour of a traditional Korean villiage along with a lunch of traditional Korean food. There were women doctor's who had paid to go on the tour and who were highly ranked speakers at this medical convention yet they were expected to cook the food for all the men. This is a tour they paid to be on and which they knew no one! That should tell you a bit about east Asian feelings about where women sit in society.

I went to a korean restaurant when in Japan, and it was just like this, you fry your meat at the table to you likiung. It was ace.

protein
25-09-2005, 11:14:26
Originally posted by Oerdin
Of course.
I wasn't sure. I've only ever heard the term on war films.

I'm going to have to look at what London venues are near a Korean restaurant and make sure we get expenses for that gig.

Funko
26-09-2005, 09:39:46
http://www.london-eating.co.uk/cuisines/korean.asp

Drekkus
26-09-2005, 10:36:33
Hmmmm, fried dog......

mr.G
26-09-2005, 10:49:35
hot?

Funko
26-09-2005, 10:50:12
How do you cold fry something?

mr.G
26-09-2005, 10:57:59
with liquid nitrogen o/c ARE YOU THE SCHJMART ONE?

The Norks
26-09-2005, 11:54:23
Oerdin is the new Darkstar :)

mr.G
26-09-2005, 11:56:09
don't tease him
he likes that

MDA
26-09-2005, 11:57:48
I've heard that Koreans really like to drink alcoholic beverages.

mr.G
26-09-2005, 12:00:02
I've read that

MoSe
26-09-2005, 13:09:04
I've heard someone quoting that

mr.G
26-09-2005, 13:11:44
yaaaay I believe Nills did the quote on that one, noone seconded that tho

MoSe
26-09-2005, 13:19:46
that's Lurker the Slacker