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Lazarus and the Gimp
08-08-2005, 19:05:37
OK- take a leap of faith here. I'm extolling the virtues of a cookery book in the writing forum.

"The River Cottage meat book" by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is something diferent, however. It's astonishingly well written on a literary level, and a genuinley intellectual book. It spends a full twenty pages pondering whether it's morally justifiable to eat meat, and tackles to case for and against without bias (including graphic slaughterhouse photos). Then it dwells at great length on where to get good organic meat, and the cuts of meat to pursue- always coupled with great detail on the type of living conditions suit the animals best. Recipes are only a minor part of the book, and (under the moral code) include recipes for using all parts of the animal- lungs, bollocks, the lot.

I'm not taking the piss. It's the only cookery book worth buying even if you never intend cooking in your life.

The Norks
08-08-2005, 23:00:01
his programmes are always worth watching- you cant diss a man whose eaten a human placenta

Nills Lagerbaak
09-08-2005, 09:30:33
Yes, you can. You can call him a human placenta eating freak. :p

King_Ghidra
09-08-2005, 09:49:12
:lol: agreed

and...

Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
It spends a full twenty pages pondering whether it's morally justifiable to eat meat, and tackles to case for and against without bias (including graphic slaughterhouse photos).

rather pointless perhaps given the premise of the book? why even enter into the argument at all?

you can call it unbiased but given that the entire purpose of the book is to present a set of meat recipes isn't that rather a ridiculous notion?

Lazarus and the Gimp
09-08-2005, 19:15:05
Not in the slightest. We have here a man who has thought long and hard about whether it is morally justifiable to eat meat, and reached the conclusion that it is. He respects the reader enough to share his reasoning and thinks it's an exercise that every meat eater should undertake- primarily because it's one step along the path to accepting we have moral obligations as the custodians of food animals, and that we should therefore treat them a darned sight better than they usually get treated in intensive modern farming aimed at prodicing the cheapest lean meat possible. He's an active campaigner for free-range organic meat.

Japher
09-08-2005, 19:50:34
http://www.petalumapoultry.com/images/product_rocky_bird.gif

Best chicken ever.

Lazarus and the Gimp
09-08-2005, 20:12:36
That's not surprising. Free-range chicken may be a little scrawnier and tougher, but it has much more flavour.

protein
09-08-2005, 21:06:10
Hmm. I might look out for that. Sounds like the type of book you could read on a plane.

I seem to be becoming quite foody as I age. Actually, all the Reading lot are as far as I can tell. Poncy southerners.

Debaser
09-08-2005, 21:21:29
I actually tore a recipe out of a magazine I was reading at work the other day.

I can't believe I'm really admitting this.

Japher
09-08-2005, 21:32:17
I have magazine recipes saved up, I actually have a recipe box and a file in which a hone and save recipes.

I am a subscriber to Cook's Illustrated magazine as well.

BigGameHunter
10-08-2005, 23:05:05
I had an awesome dill pickle soup the other day. Exactly as advertised. I kept the recipe, which the proprietors gladly furnished.

Funko
11-08-2005, 09:44:57
Originally posted by Debaser
I actually tore a recipe out of a magazine I was reading at work the other day.

I can't believe I'm really admitting this.

I'm not a big fan of recipes but if I see them I tend to absorb the more important points eg. what mix of flavours they are using and what method for making it and then just make my own thing along those lines.

Can't be bothered too much with shopping for ingredients to recipes (they never have one or two things exactly the same anyway) or following the recipe exactly.

It normally just fires off some ideas for things I might make in the future.

The Norks
11-08-2005, 13:58:34
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Not in the slightest. We have here a man who has thought long and hard about whether it is morally justifiable to eat meat, and reached the conclusion that it is. He respects the reader enough to share his reasoning and thinks it's an exercise that every meat eater should undertake- primarily because it's one step along the path to accepting we have moral obligations as the custodians of food animals, and that we should therefore treat them a darned sight better than they usually get treated in intensive modern farming aimed at prodicing the cheapest lean meat possible. He's an active campaigner for free-range organic meat.

yeah he actually walks the walk. Did you see his river cottage programme where he was totally self sufficient for a year? It was fascinating, and he really seemed to feel the loss if one of his animals died. He used every single piece of the animal as well. The one where they made black pudding was really interesting, even though I had to watch it from behind a cushion because i'm so squeamish.

King_Ghidra
11-08-2005, 14:06:21
:D i remember seeing floyd make a blood soup once, that was quite surreal

actually i meant to say though, as far as intellectual/literary food books are concerned, this (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0140446141/qid=1123765539/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl/202-1443332-9516652) one is the best i have ever encountered, a truly wonderful read.

This collection of recipes, experiences, reflections, history and philosophy raises gastronomy to the level of an art. First published in France in 1825, this book reflects a new era in French cuisine: the advent of the restaurant and the freedom of the bourgeois to eat out, selecting each dish with precision and anticipation. The book also includes Brillat-Savarin's views on taste, diet, maintaining a healthy and attractive weight, digestion, sleep and dreams and on being a gourmand.

Funko
11-08-2005, 14:25:50
Originally posted by The Norks
yeah he actually walks the walk. Did you see his river cottage programme where he was totally self sufficient for a year? It was fascinating, and he really seemed to feel the loss if one of his animals died. He used every single piece of the animal as well. The one where they made black pudding was really interesting, even though I had to watch it from behind a cushion because i'm so squeamish.

He fed up a pig for the whole series then had it slaughtered.

They got loads of complaints about the program

:confused:

Spartak
12-08-2005, 18:44:51
I just learned how to make a pepper sauce from a cookbook. :bounce:

Gary
12-08-2005, 19:56:32
You could have provided a link (http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0340826355/202-6752062-1025404)

Gary
12-08-2005, 19:58:16
So when can we borrow it then Laz ?

Fergus & The Brazen Car
13-08-2005, 09:54:59
Originally posted by Funko
He fed up a pig for the whole series then had it slaughtered.

They got loads of complaints about the program

:confused:


It was because it wasn't given the customary membership of the Conservative Party and allowed a shot at winning a parliamentary constituency.

Debaser
13-08-2005, 17:04:52
No, it was because they showed it at 7pm, right after the TV premiere of Babe, and loads of kids were still watching. :(

protein
13-08-2005, 17:19:22
It's probably healthier to show a kid the death of a pig to provide food than images and sing songs of of happy pigs living in sunny meadows for no apparent reason. Otherwise it will only become a veggie as soon as it finds out the truth.

Debaser
13-08-2005, 17:32:28
I just made that up by the way.

protein
13-08-2005, 18:47:43
It was believable. Damn you.

I'd like to not get upset when piggies get slaughtered but I do. Thankfully bacon is so tasty it's worth it.

The Norks
14-08-2005, 20:55:31
squeal like a piggy!

Funko
15-08-2005, 10:07:54
Originally posted by Debaser
No, it was because they showed it at 7pm, right after the TV premiere of Babe, and loads of kids were still watching. :(

:lol: