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View Full Version : What's all the fuss about James Blunt?


Walrus Feeder
04-08-2005, 12:23:01
Is it just me or is anyone totally baffled by the amount recent praise and chart success given to singer/songwriter James Blunt. He's music seems really unremarkable and dull and his voice sounds terrible. :confused:

Funko
04-08-2005, 12:24:15
Same with Coldplay

King_Ghidra
04-08-2005, 12:30:34
in that case, why should it be remarkable? happens all the time...

Funko
04-08-2005, 12:31:10
Yeah.

protein
04-08-2005, 12:40:57
He's beautiful. Beautiful. Beautiful, it's true.

Walrus Feeder
04-08-2005, 12:46:28
:vom: - with extra cabbage.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
04-08-2005, 14:29:08
Originally posted by Walrus Feeder
Is it just me or is anyone totally baffled by the amount recent praise and chart success given to singer/songwriter James Blunt. He's music seems really unremarkable and dull and his voice sounds terrible. :confused:


Yes, but he's been an officer in the army and can still tie his own shoelaces without the aid of the Catering Corps, a batman and a valet.

Women of a certain age moisten at the gusset over thoughts of his long(ish) hair caressing their heaving bosoms and tickling their erect nipples, and women of another age admire his slender yet muscular physique as he sits half naked in what appears to be an Irish summer setting.


I think he's about as interesting as David Gray crossed with Travis with a soupcon of Coldplay to follow.

protein
04-08-2005, 14:32:34
Originally posted by Fergus & The Brazen Car
I think he's about as interesting as David Gray crossed with Travis with a soupcon of Coldplay to follow.
Scathing! :lol:

novacane
04-08-2005, 16:22:50
I saw him in Homebase in Reading on Sunday. His jeans were covered in paint. I concluded that he must have been decorating or something.

Gramercy Riffs
04-08-2005, 16:57:42
PR Man
"So James, the last album was a real success, you've got those Tesco shoppers going crazy for your bland, inoffensive style. In fact you've been compared to David Gray, Travis and Coldplay in some quarters. The futures bright for you son. But we need a bit of a change of image for you for the second album, something abit more ccrraazzyy.

Something like this perhaps? They were a very popular beat combo from somewhere up North a while ago....
http://www.thestoneroses.co.uk/pressandmedia/books/images/0711998906.jpg

Mr Blunt
"Hm, ok, I'll do that if you tell me too. We'll do the shoot on Saturday, then, for no reason whatsoever, I'll hop down to Homebase. In Reading."

:rolleyes:

novacane
04-08-2005, 17:06:39
And it all becomes clear............

King_Ghidra
04-08-2005, 17:13:00
james blunt is surely just the next in a great line of rhyming slang singers, viz. rick witter

Beta1
04-08-2005, 17:53:44
anyone hear chris moyles taking that song apart on the radio one breakfast show?

One minute he says everythings alright cos he's got a plan but than plan appears to be that he doesn't know what to do!

Not much of a plan that.

Probably why he's not in the army anymore.

Provost Harrison
04-08-2005, 18:10:21
They should put Chris Moyles in the army. As one of those sacks that gets bayonetted...

Debaser
05-08-2005, 01:36:43
I had to listen to James Blunt's piss-weak album Back To Bedlam about 20,000 times on a loop last Sunday at work.

I'd like to either shave his smug ex-military face off and and wear it as a trophy mask, or perforate my own eardrums with his shitty 11th fret capo rather than listen to any of his listless, shitty, bland bland bland ballads ever EVER again.

I'd even go as far as to say I INFINATELY prefer Axel F by the Crazy Frog.

I'd like to mark Blunt out as a Brazilian and shove him on a tube with a ticking rucksack. Though I'm not sure I'd be satisfied with just 5 shots to the face...

Debaser
05-08-2005, 01:53:48
p.s: sorry if this sounds harsh, but I've had a bad night.

p.p.s: I mean it all.

novacane
05-08-2005, 09:53:34
So, you're not a fan either........

Nills Lagerbaak
05-08-2005, 10:44:17
I think James blunt should be the alter-ego of a member of a dope based rap outfit.

James Blunt
Bobby Bone
Kolonel Kronik
&
Ronnie "the reefer" Rizla

Fergus & The Brazen Car
05-08-2005, 12:01:27
Bland Aid:


Blunt James

David Greeeyyyyy

Travisty

Dildo

Lighthouse Inbred Family

Plague David

Cold Sick

Enyema

DevilsH@lo
11-08-2005, 00:36:28
It's a 'safe' record isn't it, i can't say i enjoyed all of it but i did find/feel something listening to No Bravery.

Seems like a riff was stolen from the connels at the start of billy sounds alot like 74-75

Provost Harrison
11-08-2005, 11:10:24
I'd like to mark Blunt out as a Brazilian and shove him on a tube with a ticking rucksack. Though I'm not sure I'd be satisfied with just 5 shots to the face...

:lol:

Lazarus and the Gimp
11-08-2005, 13:22:24
Never heard him, but I gather he's the latest rising star in the "Nicerock" genre.

The Norks
16-08-2005, 22:34:40
i liked his 'beautiful' single but then i havent heard anything else he's done. In isolation it seemed good. At least it wasnt the crazy frog.

The Norks
16-08-2005, 22:35:48
Originally posted by Fergus & The Brazen Car
Bland Aid:


Blunt James

David Greeeyyyyy

Travisty

Dildo

Lighthouse Inbred Family

Plague David

Cold Sick

Enyema

can we please add crowded fucking house to this? the most shit and overrated band in history. And Hootie and the blowfish.

protein
16-08-2005, 23:36:56
Not as bad as Pulp. Surely they were the shittiest band ever.

The Norks
16-08-2005, 23:51:15
don't diss the Cocker!!

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-08-2005, 10:17:09
Originally posted by protein
Not as bad as Pulp. Surely they were the shittiest band ever.


Nah. 'Common People' summed up so many people on the History of Art course at Manchester University in 1982-85.

Jarvis was literate and witty, and didn't write singalong tunes for drunken neds and chavs.

And took the piss out of Messiah Jackson and his Teeny Tot Choir.

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 10:27:27
Can we please have wake up boo by the boo pig-godman-motherfucking radleys as worst song ever , please.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-08-2005, 10:39:03
Originally posted by Nills Lagerbaak
Can we please have wake up boo by the boo pig-godman-motherfucking radleys as worst song ever , please.



Ooohhh. Works better than a leper's two fingers or Ann Widdecombe's tongue down the throat for shifting a heavy lunch.


I'd also like to nominate Whitney Houston for ruining a Dolly Parton number, and turning a delicate love song into the love sick trumpeting of a hippo with constipation,vaginismus, cystitis and nymphomania, and Bryan Adams for having a skin the texture of a moonscape and for singing a theme tune to a shitty Kevin Costner film and endowing yet more chav weddings with another god awful ballad of bilge.

protein
17-08-2005, 10:52:12
Witty lyrics don't mean shit to me. That's why I couldn't give a toss about The Smiths. I'm into the actual sound I hear, not the translation of the literal content of the words that make up the melody.

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 11:04:10
Originally posted by Fergus & The Brazen Car
Ooohhh. Works better than a leper's two fingers or Ann Widdecombe's tongue down the throat for shifting a heavy lunch.


I'd also like to nominate Whitney Houston for ruining a Dolly Parton number, and turning a delicate love song into the love sick trumpeting of a hippo with constipation,vaginismus, cystitis and nymphomania, and Bryan Adams for having a skin the texture of a moonscape and for singing a theme tune to a shitty Kevin Costner film and endowing yet more chav weddings with another god awful ballad of bilge.

Good analogy! Which witney song are you on about? I hope it's not I wanna dance with somebody, cos that was her finest moment

Debaser
17-08-2005, 11:12:00
I Will Always Love You.

A delicate acoustic ballad in the hands of it's creator Dolly Parton, and weapon of mass destruction (to windows and eardrums across the globe) in the hands of Mrs Bobby Brown. Truely awful.

protein
17-08-2005, 11:14:09
and iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiii

will always love yooooooooooooooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuoooooooo oo

will aaaaaaaaaaalways looooooooveeeeee

yooooooooouuuuuuuuuuuuuuuo oooooooooooooooooooooo uuuuuuuu ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Tizzy
17-08-2005, 11:22:43
God I hate that song

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-08-2005, 11:44:54
Originally posted by Debaser
I Will Always Love You.

A delicate acoustic ballad in the hands of it's creator Dolly Parton, and weapon of mass destruction (to windows and eardrums across the globe) in the hands of Mrs Bobby Brown. Truely awful.

Indeed.


Imagine if only the Titanic had had a recording of that available- no iceberg left in the water, just little chunks to chill cocktails or drop in gazpacho.

Witty lyrics don't mean shit to me.

protein

Aahh, a Coldplay fan !


(Just kidding)

Beta1
17-08-2005, 11:45:06
I think I'm going to go over to reading and slap protein for that post.

Can we add "Anything for love" by meatloaf and "Can't live (If living is without you)" by some annoying twat to the list.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-08-2005, 11:50:38
And Madonna's 'rendition' of '(My) American (Fur) Pie'- added nothing to the original and just made her look like a has been, had by all.


There must be some other retreads of old Motown or Stax et cetera numbers by hacks of little or no ability- oh, have I mentioned Kylie's 'The Locomotion' which made me wish she'd been on the tracks in the Moorgate Tube Disaster ?


Aahh- just thought- The Fugees' version of 'Killing Me Softly'- fortunately it couldn't get past the magic of the Roberta Flack version coupled with 'The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face' on 7" single.

'One Time, One Time'= two times too many.

Walrus Feeder
17-08-2005, 11:58:03
Originally posted by protein
Witty lyrics don't mean shit to me. That's why I couldn't give a toss about The Smiths. I'm into the actual sound I hear, not the translation of the literal content of the words that make up the melody.

Good, good, nice to hear someone who prefers the actual music composition and sound created rather then the yrical content I pisses me off when people seem to be able to fully recite lyrics to their favourite songs when they hear it! Haven't they grown up from primary school rhymes? Mind you I only pay attention to lyrics if they are from really intriguing frontmen like Morrissey, Kurt Cobain or even Ian Dury. Who gives a toss what Kelly Jones, Chris Martin or Rufus Wainright are on about - and as for Dylan, I get more pleasure listening to the old drunken tramp sitting outside Sainsburys!

Debaser
17-08-2005, 12:05:51
Your post makes no sense. First you ridicule those who listen to lyrics, "Haven't they grown up from primary school rhymes?", then you admit to it yourself, "Mind you I only pay attention to lyrics if they are from really intriguing frontmen like Morrissey, Kurt Cobain or even Ian Dury".

What is your point?

(and you know that Morrissey was in the Smiths right?)

protein
17-08-2005, 12:06:29
Pink Floyd were in two camps. The guitarist and keyboardist were really into the sounds, textures, melodies, atmospheres and emotion of the music and couldn't care less about lyrics and the drummer and bass player were into the content of the lyrics. Which is why I think they are such a good package, you can get lost in the music or listen to the actual words. Or, if you have a supercomputer brain do both.

King_Ghidra
17-08-2005, 12:12:03
that's a really retarded post walrus, let me summarise its idiocy

'yeah i don't give a shit about lyrics, how childish to remember them. Still i love kurt cobain's lyrics, i find him fascinating.'

:rolleyes:

as for the general principle, music without lyrics is fine, but that's just one form of expression. Contrast that with written poetry which can have a rhythym despite having no music. Most modern music falls somewhere between those two places, with varying portions of actual music and the suggested rhythym and flow of words or singing. Disputing the relative importance of one or the other is ridiculous, they are so heavily intertwined.

[edit] :o and well beaten by debaser :cry:

Fergus & The Brazen Car
17-08-2005, 12:13:41
Originally posted by Walrus Feeder
Good, good, nice to hear someone who prefers the actual music composition and sound created rather then the yrical content I pisses me off when people seem to be able to fully recite lyrics to their favourite songs when they hear it! Haven't they grown up from primary school rhymes?


Yes, imagine wanting to sing the lyrics of a song. Makes you wonder why lyricists bother.

How much more fun it is simply to hum instrumentals, like drunken chavs or rambling bag ladies.


I'm sure Cole Porter was just really pissed off writing witty lyrics and relating the meanings or sounds of the words to the sounds and rhythm of the music.

protein
17-08-2005, 12:24:24
I tend to get lost in music so the rhythms and the possibilities of other rhythms and synchopations of the rhythms takes up alot of my brain power (I'm a drummer after all), then the the textures, chords and harmony and everything else that fills up the picture gets added to that and the music becomes something that I really engage in.

I suppose when I really properly listen to music it's a bit like when i am playing music. If you ask me a question when I am playing the guitar it's impossible for me to engage fully in both and I'll probably just dribble at you or have to stop playing.

For me, it's like reading a book, the part of the brain that recreates a scene or dialogue that you are reading in a book is taken up by listening to/playing music. Having to try to do the same by imagining a story or emotion told in the lyrics means I have to mentally step back out of the music and I enjoy it less. It becomes more of a story with music in the background rather than an emotional engagement.

That sounds ridiculous doesn't it?

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 12:35:26
Not really, you are a man after all, and like Michael Burke remarked the other day, positive male traits like stoicism and single mindeness are being beaten out of us by women

Women I tells ya!

protein
17-08-2005, 12:39:55
Which is why one would think that women would make excellent drummers/musicians because of their multitasking brains. Perhaps when you multitask you only put a certain amount of effort into each task and each task suffers?

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 12:52:58
Well, there has to be an advantage of being a man! If no task suffered, we would running for our lives...

King_Ghidra
17-08-2005, 12:58:13
i think what you said is fascinating protein, but it just shows that people's minds work differently. I suspect i might not hear the same depth of the music as you, but on the flip side i don't find lyrics distracting. I know some people feel the same way about subtitles in films as well, whereas i don't find them distracting at all.

The whole area of what we do and don't see and hear, and what bits the brain tries to fill in for us is a really fascinating area.

Tizzy
17-08-2005, 13:05:05
Originally posted by protein
I suppose when I really properly listen to music it's a bit like when i am playing music. If you ask me a question when I am playing the guitar it's impossible for me to engage fully in both and I'll probably just dribble at you or have to stop playing.

For me, it's like reading a book, the part of the brain that recreates a scene or dialogue that you are reading in a book is taken up by listening to/playing music. Having to try to do the same by imagining a story or emotion told in the lyrics means I have to mentally step back out of the music and I enjoy it less. It becomes more of a story with music in the background rather than an emotional engagement.

That sounds ridiculous doesn't it?

In that case I'm ridiculous too :)
I can't listen to a piece of music without taking it apart in my head, and the lyrics is the part I'm least interested in.
Having said that, it's unfortunately the part that sinks into my brain the easiest, so while I might not be able to play along with a song I'll probably be able to sing along (well, what passes for singing)

protein
17-08-2005, 13:38:52
I can sing along and remember words etc. I would have to think about the actual meaning and read between the lines after the song had finished or if I knew the song well. I like it when the feel of the song goes with the lyrics. I like to read lyrics separate to listening to the music if I really want to get an understanding. It's all too much effort for my lazy brain.

I guess it's really just because I'm more into nodding my head to the drumbeat rather than nodding my head in intellectual agreement. There are exceptions of course. Ghost Town by the Specials is good for me because you can actually hear the streets in the music and the scene is set for the lyrics to reinforce. Radiohead is also good for me because the lyric is often nonsensical and psychadelic enough for me not to have to wonder what it's about - and the singing will often be set to a bit of music that holds back to let the vocal become centre stage. When they go off on one musically, the singing usually drops away.

The Smiths' music for me is bland and the only way I'd get enjoyment out of it is if I was reading the lyrics. Same with Bob Dylan. Same with Pulp, most rap music and all ballads.

Walrus Feeder
17-08-2005, 14:01:53
Yeah, I kinda agree that my post seemed more than a little contradictorary and didn't get my point over well. I suppose the point i am trying to make is that enjoying music doesn't neccessarily mean you have to listen to the lyrics of a song, learn them off by heart like a nursery rhyme and then recite then fully whenever hearing that song.

I think it depends on the type of song. There are the songs that have a more sing-along nature to them that benefit the following of the lyrics as the song bounces along, for example Somebody Told Me by The Killers, or even I Will Survive by Gloria Gaynor but then there are songs likes Ace Of Spades or a lot of heavy rock, which although not without good lyrics, can be appreciated just as much by nodding your head to or just turning up loud and getting engulfed by the power of it. I mean, how many people do you see singing a long to a song if they're in the mosh pit etc? And I suppose that's my point. There always seem to be an excessive focus on lyrics.

I don't mean that songwriters writing lyrics is a pointless exercise or it's pointless to listen to them but I find most lyrics bland and gain more pleasure from listening to the song as a whole, even if that means treating the singer's voice as another instrument. I appreciate the 'music' being of more expressional value than the lyrics and don't feel that you need to listen to the whole lyrics to judge whether you like or dislike a song.

When it comes it the likes of Morrissey or Cobain though, you can get drawn into listening to their lyrics as they seem like more intriguing characters who have something to say or a story to tell.
I hope that clears things up a little bit!

Walrus Feeder
17-08-2005, 14:37:44
If we are talking a song where the lyrics are great and very poetry-based look at these lyrics from the song 'Jack Shit George' by Ian Dury and the Blockheads.

What did you learn at school today?
jack shit
the minute the teacher turns away
that's it
how many times were you truly intrigued?
not any
is boredom a symptom of mental fatigue?
not many
when have you ever been top of the class?
not once
what will you do when you're out on your arse?
a dunce
what are your prospects of doing quite well?
too small
and what will you have at the very last bell?
fuck all
You can't bear another's beauty, you can't emulate a grace
you can't filch another's mystery, occupy another's space
you can't do another's duty, or take a special place
in another person's history when they've sunk without a trace
What's the reward for being a berk?
a blank
thick as a plank and looking for work
what a wank
what do you think of the welfare state?
it's a fake
what have they handed you on a plate?
the ache
have you considered how lucky you are?
well shucks
what do you think of the system so far?
it sucks
aren't you endowed with the patience of job?
i wish
don't you feel ready to conquer the globe?
oh fish
You can't steal another's thunder, you can't fill a great divide
you can't steer another's fancy, you can't change another's side
not undo another's blunder nor pretend another's pride
you can't offer necromancy till the final hope has died
I'm a second-class person citizen-wise,
this is something i must recognise
it's not my place to make complaint,
but am i happy? no, i ain't
i missed my chance when i was young,
now i live below the bottom rung
i was put on earth to discover my niche;
oh lord, won't you make me nouveau riche?

The accompanying music was damn good too!

Funko
17-08-2005, 15:14:12
Interesting debate.

I guess the revelations that people hear/listen to music differently shows even more how difficult it is to make qualitative judgements on music

protein
17-08-2005, 16:50:08
Just one thing to add, I was just listening to PJ Harvey and I was singing along to a line "See the sun set over me". The actual line is kind of nonsense but rhythmically it fits perfectly over the guitar and drums and makes me want to sing along. I think most catchy choruses are about rhythm/melody rather than the meaning of the words. If you can get a good meaning to go along with the perfect fitting rhythm you're lucky, if not a genius.

protein
17-08-2005, 16:52:04
Another good example is the chorus:

Kamikaze
Kamikaze
You canít touch me
Kamikaze

It's all about the rhythm.

King_Ghidra
17-08-2005, 16:52:37
Originally posted by Funko
Interesting debate.

I guess the revelations that people hear/listen to music differently shows even more how difficult it is to make qualitative judgements on music

no, not at all, making the judgements is easy, the problem is that no one will ever agree with you :D

Funko
17-08-2005, 16:52:41
Yeah, Pete always says that the sound and feel of the words is much more important than what they actually mean.

protein
17-08-2005, 16:56:10
I guess that's just one way of going at writing music. Jamming the words and finding the rhythm. There is the other way of doing it by writing the words and fitting a song around it. The Morrisey/Elton John method.

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 16:59:36
You clearly haven't heard the early elton john that I was refering to in the other thread. His music is really funky and quite progressive. Words are good, but certainly not what the song is fit to.

Funko
17-08-2005, 16:59:47
Yeah, some people can't write/jam at all and hate if anyone changes any part of their song. Which I find interesting...

Funko
17-08-2005, 17:00:41
Originally posted by Nills Lagerbaak
You clearly haven't heard the early elton john that I was refering to in the other thread. His music is really funky and quite progressive. Words are good, but certainly not what the song is fit to.

He's just saying how it's written. Elton doesn't write the words at all Bernie Taupin does, and he gives the words to Elton who then writes the melody and the music...

Tizzy
17-08-2005, 17:02:38
Originally posted by protein
I guess that's just one way of going at writing music. Jamming the words and finding the rhythm. There is the other way of doing it by writing the words and fitting a song around it. The Morrisey/Elton John method.

I've always had trouble with the first way,
but that could be because I've only ever written on my own before, in a band it might be different.

Nills Lagerbaak
17-08-2005, 17:05:40
Originally posted by Funko
He's just saying how it's written. Elton doesn't write the words at all Bernie Taupin does, and he gives the words to Elton who then writes the melody and the music...

Ah! Capiche. Did Bernie always write the words for Elton?

Funko
17-08-2005, 17:05:55
I've talked about it several times with 'local band' people seems to be a pretty even mix.

Funko
17-08-2005, 17:06:22
Originally posted by Nills Lagerbaak
Ah! Capiche. Did Bernie always write the words for Elton?

Yep.

Provost Harrison
17-08-2005, 17:14:34
Originally posted by protein
Pink Floyd were in two camps. The guitarist and keyboardist were really into the sounds, textures, melodies, atmospheres and emotion of the music and couldn't care less about lyrics and the drummer and bass player were into the content of the lyrics. Which is why I think they are such a good package, you can get lost in the music or listen to the actual words. Or, if you have a supercomputer brain do both.

The same applies to Morrissey and Marr, buddy :p

King_Ghidra
17-08-2005, 17:19:59
let's face it, in most bands there are one or two people who do the music, one or two people who do the lyrics, and one or two people who could be replaced by session musicians at any time :D

Provost Harrison
17-08-2005, 17:20:45
Yeah, that definitely seems to be true :lol:

Funko
17-08-2005, 17:22:06
You might be surprised how many bands jam all their songs out, even if there's only one or two lyricists.

Funko
17-08-2005, 17:23:42
Personally, I couldn't be in a band where someone else brought the songs to the band. I'd find that totally unfulfilling.

I really like the interaction and mutual inspiration you get when jamming.

protein
17-08-2005, 17:24:54
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
let's face it, in most bands there are one or two people who do the music, one or two people who do the lyrics, and one or two people who could be replaced by session musicians at any time :D

True. Coldplay/Oasis for example. One person who's in charge. I'm glad I'm not in that sort of band but we are a rarity. SU was a kind of group effort too.

The Norks
18-08-2005, 01:50:01
hmmm I like most music for the overall impact, I could barely even tell you the artist or the lyrics to my favourite songs, although I do like some lyrics. music is a bit like wallpaper to me although there's a few artists and genres I'm more into. I'm more visual as a person, so I'm more obsessive about art and who did what to who when and the methods used etc. Music just doesnt light my fire in the same way.

I like the idea of the musical process though, its very personal. How artists come up with new stuff and good stuff is a mystery to me, and I guess some approach it like a science, some have luck, and some just mess about till they find something that sticks.

Debaser
18-08-2005, 10:39:20
Originally posted by protein
There is the other way of doing it by writing the words and fitting a song around it. The Morrisey/Elton John method.

Morrissey was always give tapes of the complete backing, and wrote the words to that, not the other way around.

Funko
09-03-2006, 09:22:19
I suppose itís just that Iím also aware of a wildly popular form of commercial music that appeals to the broad swathe of people who don't actually like music that much, or for whom at least music isn't particularly important, beyond its function as something to fill in life's sonic background. And it seemed to me that James had every chance of being such an artist, who could whip up the masses into a tepid, toe-tapping frenzy as they commuted along the motorway with their suit jackets hung up on the handrail behind them.

And other very interesting stuff in this...

http://blog.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=blog.view&friendID=26931089&blogID=52032004&MyToken=ce522e19-36a7-4076-947d-a75767623235