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Drekkus
19-07-2005, 16:35:09
and eat it too.


What the hell does that mean? What good is a cake if can't eat it!?

We have cakes here at the office, and I'm contemplating getting a third piece. But I don't want to come over like the cakecrazyguy I really am.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 16:36:49
Cake!
What is it good for?
Absolutely nothing! (apart from eating)

The Norks
19-07-2005, 16:37:53
its good for bribing small children and clowns

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 16:38:27
But it makes a bad investment.

Gramercy Riffs
19-07-2005, 16:39:47
One girl took some once and vomitted so hard, she threw up her own pelvis.

Funko
19-07-2005, 16:39:48
Clowns are evil.

MoSe
19-07-2005, 16:40:24
OG

our version of that saying is:
"you can't have both a full barrel and a drunken wife"

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 16:43:06
Do you have to shoot your wife if she's drunk in Italy?

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 16:51:14
You shoot your barrel, idiot.

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 16:52:46
You empty your barrels on the barrel?

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 16:55:21
Exactly. They're so horny when drunk...

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 16:58:42
Aaaaaaaaah

Now I understand!

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:02:36
although, I admit, you'd be more likely to make a new date drink, rather than an already legally married wife.... :clueless:

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 17:03:02
:hmm:

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 17:04:20
Originally posted by MoSe
although, I admit, you'd be more likely to make a new date drink, rather than an already legally married wife.... :clueless: What???!!!

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:05:10
OK, you just got married, you bachelor memory has been already irrecoverably erased... :(

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:08:03
haven't you ever seen in a movie a dialogue like:

girl: "Are... are you trying toget me drunk?"
boy: "Why, me? not at all!" [fucking liar]

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 17:08:57
Is Dyl's explaination of the italian saying correct?

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:13:05
Yes, a drunken wife is supposed to be at least less inhibited, more exciting to have sex with, if not outright horny.

That's the traditional saying, probably reflecting old habits...
Nowadays, while from a wife you might expect to get sex anyway, from a just hooked girl you probably won't unless you get her drunk first...
er....
:cute:

Tizzy
19-07-2005, 17:15:43
:lol:

Funko
19-07-2005, 17:16:09
:lol:

Funko
19-07-2005, 17:16:30
I'm just laughing at the concept of a girlfriend not being drunk.

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 17:16:50
Aha, I thougt this meant that if your wife drinks your barrel of wine, she's drunk.

Funko
19-07-2005, 17:17:46
If I understand this right...

If I get a gun and a wife I can have sex with a barrel?

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:19:30
Jijzuz....

If you get you wife drunk, you'll have exciting sex, but you'll have no more wine.
If you keep your wine to drink, you'll have to content with a sober dull wife.

You can't keep the wine AND have the horny drunken wife.


I never PHd'ed myself so low... :(

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:20:32
Originally posted by Funko
If I get a gun and a wife I can have sex with a barrel?

In such case I'd rather say SHE'll have sex with the barrel.... :eek:

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 17:20:53
Originally posted by MoSe
Jijzuz....

If you get you wife drunk, you'll have exciting sex, but you'll have no more wine.
If you keep your wine to drink, you'll have to content with a sober dull wife.

You can't keep the wine AND have the horny drunken wife.


I never PHd'ed myself so low... :( :bash: That's not what Dyl said!

Tizzy
19-07-2005, 17:21:32
Originally posted by MoSe

You can't keep the wine AND have the horny drunken wife.


Sure you can, buy vodka :D

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 17:21:59
But you can't have a drunk wife and a loaded dick.

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:22:19
Originally posted by Drekkus
:bash: That's not what Dyl said!

That's what *I* understood he said! :lol:

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:24:10
Originally posted by Tizzy
Sure you can, buy vodka :D

OK, but in 1800 rural Italy the only widespread alcoholic was wine.
I figure even aquavite was not for the masses.

MoSe
19-07-2005, 17:24:43
Originally posted by Dyl Ulenspiegel
But you can't have a drunk wife and a loaded dick.

you mean barrel

Funko
19-07-2005, 17:27:44
If I've got a loaded barrel and an alcoholic spread I can have sex with Dyl's wife?

Drekkus
19-07-2005, 17:34:54
You can keep a full barrel yourself when you're really drunk.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 17:42:18
Originally posted by Funko
If I've got a loaded barrel and an alcoholic spread I can have sex with Dyl's wife?

My wife is no sheep.

Oerdin
19-07-2005, 18:04:46
Originally posted by Drekkus

What the hell does that mean?

It means you need to give me your cake.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
19-07-2005, 18:05:18
But you can't keep your pie either.

paiktis22
19-07-2005, 18:16:21
Originally posted by MoSe
OG

our version of that saying is:
"you can't have both a full barrel and a drunken wife"


and ours:
"you want both the pie full and the dog fed"

(meaning you want but you cant have)

Greg W
20-07-2005, 08:26:44
I can't possibly understand how anybody couldn't understand it, really.

You can have your cake. As soon as you eat it, you no longer have it. So, you can't have it and eat it too.

MoSe
20-07-2005, 08:32:22
probably the misunderstanding was in the multiple usage/meaning of "to have", Drekkus had it as "receive" or "take" like in "have a seat", while in the saying it has to be had as "possess"

Gary
20-07-2005, 09:07:30
Does anyone really equate 'have' with 'take' ?

Thanks for the example sentence, but I think it must be some kind of ancient meaning or something. No one really means you to have a seat (or take it for that matter). That's an anomoly. They mean you to sit down on a seat.

I'm with Greg on this one, never understood what everyone was going on about. Assumed it was an 'in joke', making out there was confusion just to confuse :)

MoSe
20-07-2005, 09:19:52
"kill two birds with a stone"
in italian:
"catch two pigeons with one favabean"

where english hit birds with a projectile, we lure them with food bait...

have a bite...

Koyaanisqatsi
20-07-2005, 09:29:39
At least we're direct.

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 09:51:17
Originally posted by MoSe
probably the misunderstanding was in the multiple usage/meaning of "to have", Drekkus had it as "receive" or "take" like in "have a seat", while in the saying it has to be had as "possess"
Yes, you can't eat it unless you have it, can you? If you can't have cake, you can't eat it.

Greg W
20-07-2005, 09:58:01
Basically, English can be a very silly language. So just ignore anything said in English, and you'll be fine.

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 10:14:11
So my confusion is justified. :D

Dyl Ulenspiegel
20-07-2005, 10:15:25
I found the saying a bit odd, too. It actually means "you can't eat your cake and still have/keep it", or so. For a non-native speaker, that can be confusing, even without being Drekkus.

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 10:24:06
HA! If even Dyl is confused, you can imagine how I must feel.

Funko
20-07-2005, 10:35:22
You can't have your cake and eat it is a saying that means "You can't have everything you want"

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 10:39:21
thank you, mister Phd.

Funko
20-07-2005, 10:42:54
That's not a PHd, I was trying to help.

That's twice in two days I've tried to be hjelpful. :cry:

MoSe
20-07-2005, 10:44:35
Originally posted by Funko
"You can't have everything you want"
Unless you're in Alice's Restaurant (excepting Alice)

MoSe
20-07-2005, 10:45:14
"the neighbour's grass is always greener"

how's that in english?

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 10:47:05
Originally posted by Funko
That's not a PHd, I was trying to help.

That's twice in two days I've tried to be hjelpful. :cry: Jes jes, you're a great helper. But it was explained to me a few times already.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
20-07-2005, 10:49:13
Originally posted by MoSe
"the neighbour's grass is always greener"

how's that in english?

That is english, or?

The grass is always greener on the other side (of the fence).

Funko
20-07-2005, 10:54:27
Originally posted by MoSe
Unless you're in Alice's Restaurant (excepting Alice)

:lol: That's a cracking song.

Greg W
20-07-2005, 10:54:51
Ignore Dyl's "(of the fence)", and you've got it. There's no definition of what they're referring to the other side of. It can refer to anything.

Funko
20-07-2005, 10:54:51
Originally posted by Drekkus
Jes jes, you're a great helper. But it was explained to me a few times already.

Oh. Stupid people posting things I don't read.

Funko
20-07-2005, 10:56:08
Originally posted by Greg W
Ignore Dyl's "(of the fence)", and you've got it. There's no definition of what they're referring to the other side of. It can refer to anything.

I disagree. In England at least we normally add the "of the fence." or it's implied even if people lazily don't add the last few words.

The saying is a metaphor, in the metaphor the two fields are separated by a fence, it doesn't matter what two things you are metaphoring about or what they are separated by.

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 10:57:22
Does it have to be a fence? Couldn't it a small creek, or a road?

Koyaanisqatsi
20-07-2005, 10:59:16
It's usually a latrine trench, in my experience.

Greg W
20-07-2005, 10:59:51
The fact that they refer to grass doesn't really mean anything either. The saying can be used to refer to women (the one you don't have is always less nagging than the one you do), cars, houses, whatever. It is basically saying that you'll never be happy no matter what you have, cos you'll always think there's something better on the other side (of whatever).

And seeing as I have never ever heard "of the fence" used, it must be some limey crap they throw on the end to try and justify their own existance.

Funko
20-07-2005, 11:00:08
It's a saying. If you say "of the road" it'd mean the same but you'd have the saying wrong.

Like killing two birds with one stone. You could say "killing two birds with one bullet" but that's not what the saying is.

Funko
20-07-2005, 11:01:26
Originally posted by Greg W
The fact that they refer to grass doesn't really mean anything either. The saying can be used to refer to women (the one you don't have is always less nagging than the one you do), cars, houses, whatever. It is basically saying that you'll never be happy no matter what you have, cos you'll always think there's something better on the other side (of whatever).

And seeing as I have never ever heard "of the fence" used, it must be some limey crap they throw on the end to try and justify their own existance.

Must just be you lazy aussies then...

see the google results for it:

Results 1 - 10 of about 5,990 for "the grass is always greener on the other side of the fence". (0.30 seconds)

Link to the search didn't work but here's a link to a guy who wrote a whole essay about it:

http://info.utas.edu.au/docs/flonta/DP,1,1,95/GRASS.html

Greg W
20-07-2005, 11:04:48
Well, there's 73,000 for "the grass is always greener". so less than 10% of people use the fence crap.

So, that's a poor de-fence you have there.

Funko
20-07-2005, 11:06:23
That just shows that there are a lot of lazy people in the world.

Funko
20-07-2005, 11:07:33
You don't need to finish the saying because people know the ending (except for Greg...)

It's exactly the same as the way people just say "a stitch in time" or "too many cooks" without adding the rest of the saying, it's not needed.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
20-07-2005, 11:13:00
Originally posted by Greg W
Ignore Dyl's "(of the fence)", and you've got it. There's no definition of what they're referring to the other side of. It can refer to anything.

I think Funko is right, it's a neighbourhood classic and you are just using the shortened version, you lazy bastard.

Our version: The cherries from the neighbour's garden are always sweeter.

Greg W
20-07-2005, 11:16:12
Actually, most people I know shorten it to "The grass is always greener", so you'd be implying two levels of short-cutting.

Whatever though, it's not like it's going to change the world either way...

MoSe
20-07-2005, 11:25:12
Originally posted by Greg W
you'll always think there's something better on the other side

A better cake!
Can I have it?
AND eat it?!?

Funko
20-07-2005, 11:27:31
No. And the broth is fucked too.

MoSe
20-07-2005, 11:29:48
Originally posted by Greg W
Ignore Dyl's "(of the fence)" Originally posted by Funko
I disagree. In England at least we normally add the "of the fence." or it's implied even if people lazily don't add the last few words. Originally posted by Greg W
So, that's a poor de-fence you have there.

So, should I take "of the fence", or not?
:p

Koyaanisqatsi
20-07-2005, 11:30:15
Yes.

MoSe
20-07-2005, 11:32:26
I'm a bit off-fended indeed

Dyl Ulenspiegel
20-07-2005, 11:33:43
Just drop your pants and sit on the fence.

Gary
20-07-2005, 12:19:08
Originally posted by MoSe
have a bite... I think you've just pointed out one if the many oddities in English. Can't say I've ever equated the two. Sometimes repeated/used phrases heard before without anaysing too deeply.

In this example, is "a bite" the action, or the result ? You don't really take a bite, you bite and take what you have bitten off. So 'have' is correct, not 'take' ?

Ugh... edukashunal stuff.

Gary
20-07-2005, 12:22:35
Originally posted by Drekkus
Yes, you can't eat it unless you have it, can you? If you can't have cake, you can't eat it.

You can't eat it until you have it. But you can't have your cake and have eaten it because if you eat it, then you don't have it any longer (excluding stuff inside you that is). Take it from a native, the quibbling is meaningless ;)

Drekkus
20-07-2005, 12:26:43
I think 'you can't keep your cake and eat it too' would be better.

Gary
20-07-2005, 12:27:56
Possibly so, but some things are assumed implied.

Now where's my cake ? Seem to be plenty of fruitcakes in the forums !