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Funko
22-06-2005, 11:14:27
Does anyone know where I can find out how HOT the DOGstar is?

mr.G
22-06-2005, 11:18:55
no

Funko
22-06-2005, 11:22:53
Dammit.

I might try google.

MDA
22-06-2005, 11:24:35
:lol:

Cruddy
22-06-2005, 12:35:11
Try asking somebody with really LONG thermometer.

RedFred
24-06-2005, 05:41:40
You can't be Sirius.

KrazyHorse@home
24-06-2005, 05:50:27
Sirius A is around 10000 K and Sirius B is around 25000 K

Oerdin
24-06-2005, 06:17:43
Beat me too it. My old astronomy book from college has a chapter on the temperature of stars along with how those temperatures change over time.

Gary
24-06-2005, 08:10:24
Hope you won your green piece of pie.

The Norks
24-06-2005, 09:17:17
Originally posted by Funko
Does anyone know where I can find out how HOT the DOGstar is?

does anyone know WHY this information is necessary in life?
:confused:

Gary
24-06-2005, 09:40:39
Does anyone know WHY life is necessary ?

DaShi
24-06-2005, 10:15:13
Originally posted by Cruddy
Try asking somebody with really LONG thermometer.

You and your obsession with long thermometers.

DaShi
24-06-2005, 10:16:20
Originally posted by Gary
Does anyone know WHY life is necessary ?

Life is an efficient means of creating entropy. Kind of like a nuclear bomb, but worse.

Gary
24-06-2005, 11:29:29
But why do we need so much entropy ? I prefer a little order, not too much, just enough. Like my desk surface.

Funko
24-06-2005, 11:42:52
Originally posted by The Norks
does anyone know WHY this information is necessary in life?
:confused:

It's not necessary.

Is it interesting/useful - different question, different answer.

The Norks
24-06-2005, 11:53:28
how is it useful? Are you going there on holiday?

we need a :physicsgeek: smiley :D

Funko
24-06-2005, 11:55:53
Useful as part of understanding the universe.

The Norks
24-06-2005, 11:57:56
ah- in that case you need the following information:

42

Funko
24-06-2005, 12:03:58
That's an answer bereft of understanding.

Immortal Wombat
24-06-2005, 12:05:17
The surface temperature of the Dog Star (Sirius A) is 42, expressed in the unit of Norkees, which is equal to roughly 225 Kelvin.

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:06:00
thats why god invented computers mike- so we dont have to think anymore :D

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:06:50
Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
The surface temperature of the Dog Star (Sirius A) is 42, expressed in the unit of Norkees, which is equal to roughly 225 Kelvin.

Norkees are measured in figures expressed as pounds of pressure per square foot

Immortal Wombat
24-06-2005, 12:07:43
Sorry. Maybe I was thinking of Norkoos then.

Funko
24-06-2005, 12:08:27
Originally posted by The Norks
thats why god invented computers mike- so we dont have to think anymore :D
Except for programmers - FACT!

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:09:08
yes, the average person's temperature is one Norkoo, and this is used as the standard :)

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:10:05
Originally posted by Funko
Except for programmers - FACT!

programmers are themselves powered by tiny computers

Immortal Wombat
24-06-2005, 12:11:27
Originally posted by The Norks
yes, the average person's temperature is one Norkoo, and this is used as the standard :)
You're breaking the maths :bash:

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:12:36
I only got a C in chemistry :)

Funko
24-06-2005, 12:15:09
Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
You're breaking the maths :bash:

It's a logorithmic scale.

Funko
24-06-2005, 12:15:33
Originally posted by The Norks
I only got a C in chemistry :)

I made an E. :lol:

:nervous:

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:20:21
Originally posted by Funko
It's a logorithmic scale.

is that a sex toy?

Funko
24-06-2005, 12:26:08
Do you ever think about anything else?

The Norks
24-06-2005, 12:31:45
not really no... :)