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Kory
13-06-2005, 22:24:57
Just had some quesadillas with freshly-made salsa.

To make it, I diced two vidalia onions, then started working on dicing the tomatoes. After getting three done, I sprinkled everything with sea salt and a bit of lime juice, then chopped some more, and repeated this, through 8 decent-sized roma tomatoes' worth, using about half a lime total. After that, I added two serrano peppers -- one of which I took the seeds out of, one of which had them left in -- and one decent-sized jalapeņo, mixed everything up, and chopped up some cilantro. Once I added the cilantro -- a small handful, let's say -- I added some more sea salt, and then juiced the other half of the lime, and then carefully mixed it all up.

I think one serrano would have been sufficient, but it's pretty yummy as is.

-- Kory (Now pointedly not talking about stupid pedophilia cases.)

Lazarus and the Gimp
13-06-2005, 22:27:29
How much Jesus juice was that?

Cruddy
13-06-2005, 22:29:51
A true Thriller of a recipe.

Lazarus and the Gimp
13-06-2005, 22:31:20
Albeit slightly off the wall.

The Norks
13-06-2005, 22:31:46
Kory, is cilantro the same as what we Brits call coriander? And whats a serrano pepper?

I like making my own guacamole- avocados half smooth and half roughly chopped, lime juice, chilli peppers, coriander and chopped tomatoes if you like, then dolloped on salty tortilla chips. Yum! Takes about 5-10 mins

Lazarus and the Gimp
13-06-2005, 22:33:51
Originally posted by The Norks
And whats a serrano pepper?



It's like any other pepper except that it allegedly bums children.

Cruddy
13-06-2005, 22:35:33
Originally posted by The Norks
Kory, is cilantro the same as what we Brits call coriander? And whats a serrano pepper?

I like making my own guacamole- avocados half smooth and half roughly chopped, lime juice, chilli peppers, coriander and chopped tomatoes if you like, then dolloped on salty tortilla chips. Yum! Takes about 5-10 mins

No garlic? NO GARLIC?

Thats' not guacomole!

Kory
13-06-2005, 22:39:29
Jesus was not juiced to make my salsa.

Cilantro is the leafy, parsley-ish part of the coriander plant; usually when I hear 'coriander', I think the (ground) seeds. If you mean the leafy part, though, it's the same thing, yah.

Serranos (http://www.g6csy.net/chile/peppers/serrano.jpg) are small, slightly thin, and a deep but not dark green chili pepper (well, you can use them red, but I usually buy and use them green). I use them in guacamole, too.

-- Kory (Garlic does not belong in guacamole. But it does belong in the dill dip I'll be making later.)

Immortal Wombat
13-06-2005, 22:41:23
I had a Mars Bar.

Ingredients: 1 Mars Bar.
Preparation time: 7 seconds.

protein
13-06-2005, 23:23:09
I would have put garlic in the salsa too. But then, I put garlic in everything.

The Norks
14-06-2005, 00:11:50
Originally posted by Cruddy
No garlic? NO GARLIC?

Thats' not guacomole!

oh yes forgot that

Provost Harrison
14-06-2005, 01:08:39
You couldn't just dice onions, sprinkle salt and chop pepper, oh no, you have to go for something altogether more poncy...

Oerdin
14-06-2005, 06:42:38
Originally posted by The Norks
Kory, is cilantro the same as what we Brits call coriander? And whats a serrano pepper?

http://www.gourmetsleuth.com/cilantro.htm#History%20and%20Lore


Cilantro - pronounced [sih-LAHN-troh]
This member of the carrot family is also referred to as Chinese Parsley and Coriander. It is actually the leaves (and stems) of the Coriander plant. Cilantro has a very pungent odor and is widely used in Mexican, Caribbean and Asian cooking. The Cilantro leaves look a bit like flat Italian parsley and in fact are related.

History and Lore
Coriander grows wild in South East Europe and had been cultivated in Egypt, India and China for thousands of years. It is mentioned in Sanskrit text and the Bible Spanish conquistadors introduced it to Mexico and Peru where it now commonly paired with chilies in the local cuisine. It has since become very popular in the Southwest and Western part of the United States as well as in most metropolitan areas. An interesting note is that people of European decent frequently are reviled by the smell of cilantro. It has not gained in popularity in Europe as it has in many other parts of the world.

Coriander is believed to be named after "koris", the Greek word for "bedbug" as it was said they both emitted a similar odor. The Chinese used the herb in love potions believing it provided immortality. Coriander is one of the herbs thought to have aphrodisiac qualities. The book of The Arabian nights tells a tale of a merchant who had been childless for 40 years and but was cured by a concoction that included coriander. That book is over 1000 years old so the history of coriander as an aphrodisiac dates back far into history. Cilantro was also know to be used as an "appetite" stimulant.

Buy and Store
Cilantro can normally be found fresh in your local grocery store and is available year-round. Before you store cilantro it should be rinsed and left moist (not wet) and place in a plastic bag. The cilantro may be stored for up to 1 week.

Medicinal Uses
Coriander is considered an aid to the digestive system. It is an appetite stimulant and aids in the secretion of gastric juices. A poultice of Coriander seed can be applied externally to relieve painful joints and rheumatism. Once source (Herbs & Herb Gardening by Jessica Houdret) said the seeds can be mixed with violets for a remedy for a hangover.

The essential oils of the cilantro leaves contain antibacterial properties and can be used as a fungicide. Coriander seeds is considered to have cholesterol lowering properties.