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View Full Version : Higher calling or Work of Satan?


BigGameHunter
08-06-2005, 20:13:39
My oldest boy, Prosper, seems to be a bit of a natural at everything he tries. He's currently smashing tee shots 75 yards into the street from our yard all day, and has shown proficiency with numbers, letters, memorization, drawing, etc. etc. The youngest is going to be a dentist or a bouncer I think, nothing wrong with that.

Anyhow, the other day the little poppet climbed up on the seat in front of my neighbor's drum kit and started keeping a beat to some music on the radio, complete with alternating beats (I can't do that), hi-hats, cascading cymbal/tom riffs, the works. It was quite amazing.

The wife wants to get him a kit. I figure if he's a prodigy, we should get him more golf clubs or a Junior Stock Investor Kit or something.

Decide.

Funko
08-06-2005, 20:16:16
What a fantastic idea for a thread. :cute:

DRUMS! Get him a kit. :beer:

BigGameHunter
08-06-2005, 20:18:15
Oh yeah...should have cited the source...sorry!

OK...I'll send you his first 4 hour demo.

Funko
08-06-2005, 20:19:00
:lol:

Funko
09-06-2005, 10:20:25
Having now found a drummer for my band ( :beer: ) I'm still thinking there is a need for more good drummers out there.

Tizzy
09-06-2005, 11:03:40
Definitely get him drums!*

*completely unbiased answer

The Higgelhoff
09-06-2005, 11:15:01
My little'un has been playing drums for months :D

protein
09-06-2005, 11:37:26
Get him a kit!!! And think about soundproofing a room for him.

Don't let anyone talk you into getting a child-sized drum kit, he'll need a real one. They are pretty low maintenance, he'll need a new snare skin every two months or so and new skins elsewhere every year/two years or so. He'll also need to learn how to tune his kit.

Let him learn the drums himself rather than sending him to a jazz teacher who makes him do grades. He'll turn into a twat if you do that, he'll be judging how good he thinks he is by exams and bits of paper rather than actually listening to himself and hearing if he is good.

A rock teacher for six months to a year should set him on the way and then he'll be good enough to jam with bands and start learning properly.

Funko
09-06-2005, 11:45:12
Let him learn the drums himself rather than sending him to a jazz teacher who makes him do grades. He'll turn into a twat if you do that, he'll be judging how good he thinks he is by exams and bits of paper rather than actually listening to himself and hearing if he is good.
Dunno how many times I've said this but is possible to learn an instrument, get a really good feel for the music etc AND do grades and not turn into a twat, eg. half your band, Sam etc.

protein
09-06-2005, 12:24:10
Sam learned bass by jamming with me. I learned drums by jamming with him.

The rest of my current band used to be god awful - they even used to do a bit where they would take turns to do acoustic songs *shudder* - they learned to be good from jamming for years and years. We can get in the rehearsal room and jam a song from beginning to end without the song ever existing before. Doing theory doesn't teach you that. Reading marks on a page doesn't teach you that. Steve taught himself in a matter of months and I reckon he's one of the best guitarists I've met after Nigel. Who also taught himself guitar.

I've met and recorded more drummers than you, and I can say hands on heart with experience that the drummers who think they are good and tell me about their grades are always really irritating and don't think about the band, recording or music as a whole. They aren't nearly as interested in the music as drummers who actually jam and listen and feel. They may be able to do ridiculously unnecessary trills but they don't listen to how their drumming interacts with the bass and guitars. Infact most of the time they put unnecessary crap in to show off and it sounds stupid. Like a guitarist who won't stop soloing and doesn't even realise there is a rest of the band.

Funko
09-06-2005, 12:27:55
I can't be bothered having this argument again it's like the 20th time.

Generalisations like that annoy me but I should just try and ignore them.

protein
09-06-2005, 12:31:55
I've recorded enough drummers and guitarists and been in enough bands to see this for myself. I'm not making it up just for the sake of it.

Nills Lagerbaak
09-06-2005, 12:38:02
Originally posted by protein
Like a guitarist who won't stop soloing and doesn't even realise there is a rest of the band.

I would have thought you'd realised that was a joke by now....

And yes, these are the stupidest of generalisations.

Funko
09-06-2005, 12:44:58
The crazy thing about how the argument is that in basically I agree with you. I think the way you phrase it seems so extreme it really riles me.

I think it's because it makes it seem as though you think anyone who has learnt more formally are people who can't play/write/jam (actually sometimes the way you phrase it makes it sound like they have less worth as people). It makes it sound like you judge them before you know them based on your preconceptions of what they will be like. Which is a form of predjudice and that's probably what annoys me.

Treat each individual as they come I reckon, don't assume anything about them, just 'cause other people have been like that in the past. :beer:

The other thing is that you happen to be a very naturally musical person, which is fantastic, but lots and lots of people don't have that natural ability and have to learn more formally. They might not be as good but that doesn't mean they shouldn't be able to learn or have fun playing or be treated as lesser mortals.

Anyway. :beer:

protein
09-06-2005, 13:08:43
Originally posted by Nills Lagerbaak
I would have thought you'd realised that was a joke by now....

And yes, these are the stupidest of generalisations.
It was a joke when you said it, but there really are guitarists like that. I've recorded plenty of them.

Lazarus and the Gimp
09-06-2005, 18:23:25
Originally posted by protein
I've met and recorded more drummers than you, and I can say hands on heart with experience that the drummers who think they are good and tell me about their grades are always really irritating and don't think about the band, recording or music as a whole. They aren't nearly as interested in the music as drummers who actually jam and listen and feel. They may be able to do ridiculously unnecessary trills but they don't listen to how their drumming interacts with the bass and guitars. Infact most of the time they put unnecessary crap in to show off and it sounds stupid. Like a guitarist who won't stop soloing and doesn't even realise there is a rest of the band.

Well I was a classical percussionist, and I can promise you that I've never once heard an overture ruined by one of the percussion section going off on a jazz solo. The amount of teamwork and thought required by trained orchestral percussionists is in no way less than that involved in a rock band.

BigGameHunter
09-06-2005, 21:33:27
Forget it...I forgot how gay musicians can be.

*End Is Forever*
12-06-2005, 20:36:33
Go with the Junior Stock Investor kit... ;)

Provost Harrison
12-06-2005, 22:47:31
I got a chemistry set and look how I ended up...

Debaser
12-06-2005, 23:07:05
Like this?
http://www.muf.me.uk/files/london2005/sat35.jpg

Funko
13-06-2005, 09:09:58
Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Forget it...I forgot how gay musicians can be.

:lol:

The Higgelhoff
13-06-2005, 11:35:33
Originally posted by Debaser
Like this?
http://www.muf.me.uk/files/london2005/sat35.jpg

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Lurker the Second
13-06-2005, 21:15:37
Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Forget it...I forgot how gay musicians can be.

:lol:

devilmunchkin
19-06-2005, 06:05:52
just my opinion: but maybe let him dabble where he wants and shows interest.. he's still just a kid. then when he's older, maybe you can start encouraging one thing over another

The Norks
20-06-2005, 15:23:14
not that I know jack about drums, but my mate used to own a music studio with her partner who was a professional drummer, and she said there are two types of musicians: self taught and 'book learned', and they are both valuable but pretty distinct. She said you can always spot the book learned ones because they need to use a metronome and go off course without it, and the self taught people frequently don't show the discipline or structural understanding that classically taught people do.

Why not send him to lessons, and if he sticks it out for more than three months, buy him a kit?

BigGameHunter
21-06-2005, 22:14:48
Lessons for a 4 year old? Why not just burn my money in a big wish-flavored spliff right now?
:)

The Norks
22-06-2005, 18:32:33
he's 4?

why are you even considering drums then? buy him a bloody kids xylophone and stop yer moaning. you'll be lucky if he can even spell drums at the moment. :confused:

BigGameHunter
23-06-2005, 21:04:26
He can...he's a prodigy. That's why I'm going to have a secret paternity test.

JM^3
23-06-2005, 21:10:17
true prodigies learn the violin

JM
(and maybe the piano)

Tizzy
23-06-2005, 22:07:36
True prodigies don't learn, they just do

The Norks
23-06-2005, 22:24:28
sell him to medical science

BigGameHunter
24-06-2005, 20:01:07
I'm selling myself--they're doing a study on how idiots staring into microwaves because they are fascinated by the popcorn popping somehow addle their genetic structure enough to produce hyper-intelligent offspring.

Unfortunately for Zane, I think I was on a bit of a popcorn hiatus leading up to his conception.
:(

The Norks
27-06-2005, 02:47:19
he might be a late bloomer. Or an artiste.