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Provost Harrison
17-05-2005, 17:23:01
MOBIUS mentioned this expression in another thread, and I was curious, just where does this expression come from? How come anally splitting a restaurant bill is associated with these fantastic people? ;) Is there something we do not know about our Dutch counterparts?

Funko
17-05-2005, 17:27:58
I thought going dutch just meant splitting the bill, which could just be 50/50 not necessarily anally counting every item.

That said in quite a few places on the continent you can ask for seperate bills. Can't remember exactly where I've seen that but you definitely can in Prague. I learnt the phase for asking for 'seperate' or 'together' in German.

Often when the waiter/waitress realises you are English they assume you'll have the 'together' bill and work it out ourselves, they must have realised most of us don't really get the concept. :)

Er... anyway.

MoSe
17-05-2005, 17:29:29
is anally splitting a :brwncard:able expression?

interestingly anyway, by us when you split the bill equally (i.e. everybody pays the same regardless of what they took) we say "to split the Roman way"

Mr. Bas
17-05-2005, 17:33:09
Actually, over here it's the Germans that have a reputation of always wanting separate bills for everything they do, which is a bit annoying because it's something that needs to be done manually.

MoSe
17-05-2005, 17:39:43
I remember when I used to hang out with my fellow Chess Circle players, they BOTH expected to split the bill *easily* (i.e. equally) AND *fairly* (i.e. each one paid for what he consumed).

This entailed that each one's separate bill HAD to tally the same amount.
At least we were not forced to take the very same food, but we had to stick to equally composed menus, that is same number of items, each equally priced within its serving (we could take different pizzas or desserts but they had to cost the same as the others'...).

Once that I insisted I wanted a tiramisu while the others had a bit of a hurry and all skipped the dessert, they told me: "Very well, now YOU'll have to endure the boring task of splitting the bill precisely and perform all the annoying calculation, which we could have so easily avoided..."
We almost got an argument about that.

suckers
:rolleyes:

MoSe
17-05-2005, 17:43:53
In recent years, when you lunch out with colleagues (and one pays cash, the other one with CC, one had the default menu, the dietary just a salad, the glutton :cute: a full course and/or fancy dishes...), it has become more and more customary that the cashier inputs separate bills while checking out items from the comprehensive list of the items served at the table.

mr.G
17-05-2005, 17:44:33
Originally posted by Provost Harrison
Is there something we do not know about our Dutch counterparts? Yes there is a lot you don't know about us

jsorense
17-05-2005, 17:46:48
Dutch Courage

Provost Harrison
17-05-2005, 17:48:41
Originally posted by MoSe
I remember when I used to hang out with my fellow Chess Circle players, they BOTH expected to split the bill *easily* (i.e. equally) AND *fairly* (i.e. each one paid for what he consumed).

This entailed that each one's separate bill HAD to tally the same amount.
At least we were not forced to take the very same food, but we had to stick to equally composed menus, that is same number of items, each equally priced within its serving (we could take different pizzas or desserts but they had to cost the same as the others'...).

Once that I insisted I wanted a tiramisu while the others had a bit of a hurry and all skipped the dessert, they told me: "Very well, now YOU'll have to endure the boring task of splitting the bill precisely and perform all the annoying calculation, which we could have so easily avoided..."
We almost got an argument about that.

suckers
:rolleyes:

Chess circle? Figures...if they carried on like that, I'd just have to thump them all (or insisted they all ate tiramisu too :D)

Venom
17-05-2005, 17:49:43
I thought going dutch meant that the chick payed the whole bill.

Drekkus
17-05-2005, 17:51:27
I think it has something to do with the anglo dutch wars, when anti dutch propaganda was used by the english.

No idea if that is true though.

Provost Harrison
17-05-2005, 17:53:30
Sounds good to me :D

Venom
17-05-2005, 17:57:10
Originally posted by Drekkus
I think it has something to do with the anglo dutch wars, when anti dutch propaganda was used by the english.

No idea if that is true though.

No that's where the dutch over comes from.

mr.G
17-05-2005, 18:07:20
Originally posted by Venom
I thought going dutch meant that the chick payed the whole bill.
and swallows

Venom
17-05-2005, 18:08:54
:lol:

mr.G
17-05-2005, 18:16:20
so that's the new definition.
may 17 2005.

man o man sometimes life is great.

JM^3
17-05-2005, 18:32:10
ways to split the bill

equally

anally

drunkenly (where the most drunk pays for 50%+ of the bill... unfortunately that is often me)

Jon Miller

JM^3
17-05-2005, 19:05:48
that shuold be modified to most drunk who didn't bring enough cash

Jon Miller

The Norks
17-05-2005, 19:49:01
I thought 'Going Dutch' was a porn flick :rolleyes: :)

Gary
17-05-2005, 22:40:43
I always assumed that it was related to "Dutch doors" which are split in the middle (allowing you to open the top and yet leave the bottom closed).

mr.G
17-05-2005, 22:41:29
wow that sounds plausible.

Lazarus and the Gimp
17-05-2005, 22:43:07
Originally posted by Gary
I always assumed that it was related to "Dutch doors" which are split in the middle (allowing you to open the top and yet leave the bottom closed).

Ah yes. If you split the bill, she keep her knickers on. It makes sense now.

alsieboo
17-05-2005, 22:43:14
Originally posted by Venom
I thought going dutch meant that the chick payed the whole bill.

fuck off, I never pay for anything, especially when I'm with a bloke!

mr.G
17-05-2005, 22:45:36
swallow?

paiktis22
17-05-2005, 23:50:22
:lol:

Greg W
18-05-2005, 00:30:50
According to DictionaryLabourLawTalk:The origin of the phrase "going Dutch" is unknown. Several phrases using Dutch that show Dutch people in a bad light, e.g. Dutch courage, Dutch uncle, were created because the Netherlands used to be a great rival to England in the 17th century (especially the Dutch East India Company). It should be noted, however, that Dutch often refers to Germany rather than the Netherlands, e.g. Pennsylvania Dutch.HARR HARR HARR

mr.G
18-05-2005, 08:43:48
so that's what Drek said. :rolleyes:

Oerdin
18-05-2005, 08:57:18
Pennsylvania Dutch just refers to Amish. Amish were originally German but they moved to Holland to escape religious persecution then later moved to the US when the Dutch started cracking down on them as well.

mr.G
18-05-2005, 08:59:20
no, we stole their cow.
and poked their eyes for fun

zmama
18-05-2005, 11:11:38
Originally posted by Oerdin
Pennsylvania Dutch just refers to Amish. Amish were originally German but they moved to Holland to escape religious persecution then later moved to the US when the Dutch started cracking down on them as well.

Kinda but no

Most Pennsylvania Dutch are not and were not Amish. And had nothing to do with the Dutch. Many many germans settled in south central PA and Northern Maryland... like my father's family
Was just a mispronunciation of Deutsch

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 11:19:58
Originally posted by mr.G
so that's what Drek said. :rolleyes: I RULE!!!! :bounce:

Funko
18-05-2005, 11:20:19
Only if you win the election!

mr.G
18-05-2005, 11:22:25
president Drekkus
president Drekkus

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaarccccccccccchhhh

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 11:22:48
I will be the resident president of CG.

Funko
18-05-2005, 11:25:46
So...

bearing in mind in Germany you can ask for the bill together or seperate and Dutch is often a mistaken Deutch - maybe this is where it came from?

zmama
18-05-2005, 11:27:43
That would be my guess...but *shrug*

Funko
18-05-2005, 11:31:03
http://www.word-detective.com/back-l2.html

Dear Evan: I am curious about the history of the phrase "going dutch." -- Gary Zimmerman, via the Internet.

I'm going to hazard a guess that what you're asking about is the phrase "Dutch treat," meaning "no treat at all because each person pays his or her own check." "Dutch treat" is a linguistic relic of a low point in relations between England and The Netherlands. Back in the 17th century, when both countries were building their global empires, their intense rivalry found an outlet in a wide range of popular sayings invented by each country to insult the other. Since we are primarily an English-speaking culture, the few phrases that have survived are, inevitably, those disparaging the Dutch, but even those are rarely heard today.

According to Hugh Rawson, who explores such topics at length in his wonderful book "Wicked Words" (Crown Publishers), many of the English anti-Dutch terms became popular in the U.S. because of confusion with the word "Deutsch," or German, and were often applied to German immigrants. For the connoisseurs of insults among us, Mr. Rawson lists more than two pages of anti-Dutch slurs once popular.

Along with "Dutch treat," which originally implied "cheap," other insults once popular included "Dutch courage" (liquor), "Dutch defense" (a retreat), "Dutch headache" (a hangover), "Do a Dutch" (commit suicide), "Dutch concert" (a drunken uproar), and "Dutch nightingale" (a frog, which seems an especially low blow).

"Dutch treat" has long since lost its original sting, and today "pay your own way" seems to be standard practice among those who date.

zmama
18-05-2005, 11:33:51
I'm gonna start using "Dutch headache"


Seems very descriptive :D

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 11:46:10
Originally posted by Funko
[url] "Dutch treat" is a linguistic relic of a low point in relations between England and The Netherlands. Back in the 17th century, when both countries were building their global empires, their intense rivalry found an outlet in a wide range of popular sayings invented by each country to insult the other. Since we are primarily an English-speaking culture, the few phrases that have survived are, inevitably, those disparaging the Dutch, but even those are rarely heard today.
Damn I'm good.

MoSe
18-05-2005, 13:07:04
Originally posted by zmama
I'm gonna start using "Dutch headache"


Seems very descriptive :D

as it brings to our minds a very particular shade of green... :lol:

Greg W
18-05-2005, 13:09:13
Avoid hangovers. Throw up all over Funko instead. :vom:

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 13:32:23
Originally posted by MoSe
as it brings to our minds a very particular shade of green... :lol: I think it was emphasised by the green shirt I was wearing. :D

MoSe
18-05-2005, 13:38:19
I think it was the other way around ;)

zmama
18-05-2005, 13:39:43
Shirt doesn't look very green to me ;)

http://www.loudmedicine.net/hamburg/assets/images/Drek.jpg

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 13:54:02
Yes it is, and the jacket too.

Tizzy
18-05-2005, 13:56:44
Green when viewed with a Dutch headache maybe

mr.G
18-05-2005, 13:57:45
is there an other way?
:100-0 protection:

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 13:59:34
Originally posted by Tizzy
Green when viewed with a Dutch headache maybe What colour is it then?? Maybe the camera is off colour, because that is definately a green shirt.

Greg W
18-05-2005, 14:01:06
Khaki maybe? Peuce? Doesn't look very green though.

Venom
18-05-2005, 14:01:09
Who the hell is wearing red pants in that picture?

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 14:02:07
:lol: Who'd you think?

Venom
18-05-2005, 14:08:35
Just wanted to make sure.

zmama
18-05-2005, 14:37:56
hehehehe

MoSe
18-05-2005, 15:16:08
That red stands out only because it's the complementary color of green.
And viceversa :D

Venom
18-05-2005, 15:22:25
And also because no straight man would ever wear red pants that weren't part of some uniform.

MoSe
18-05-2005, 15:24:41
ah, OK then, that's my CG meeting uniform

Venom
18-05-2005, 15:30:20
Sports and military uniforms only. School, band, or any other uniform is gay.

mr.G
18-05-2005, 15:33:27
Originally posted by Venom
And also because no straight man would ever wear red pants that weren't part of some uniform. pinks shirts tho...........

MoSe
18-05-2005, 15:37:53
right now I have a colleauge beside me wearing red trousers and a pink shirt.
I admit I wouldn't point him out as a paradigm of manliness.

Venom
18-05-2005, 15:47:09
We've covered this before. Pink shirts are gangsta and incredibly cool.

Red pants...have never been gangsta. Even the red pants gang wore black pants.

mr.G
18-05-2005, 15:49:25
Pink shirts are gangstra and coooool?

yaaaaaay sure for the pink ladies perhaps.

Drekkus
18-05-2005, 15:51:43
Originally posted by Venom
Even the red pants gang wore black pants. :lol:

jsorense
18-05-2005, 15:53:21
Pink Lady

1 1/2 oz. Gin, Cream, Dash of Grenadine

Shake with ice, Strain into a Champagne saucer or Flute


:nervous: