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View Full Version : He should have covered his tracks.


Deacon
07-05-2005, 08:20:22
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/10/08/prosecutor_dumps_pc/
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/05/06/dutch_prosecutor_porn_shame/

Do utilities that randomly write and re-write the entire disk multiple times actually get the job done? I want to say yes, but some experts are saying that there's a way to retrieve data, even after a random re-write. Does this mean that the bits somehow "remember" previous states as well as the current state? How much work is it to ground up the disk platter?

Sir Penguin
07-05-2005, 09:52:10
If you open up the hard drive, there's a really strong magnet inside. Run that over the disk platters a few times, then take an SOS pad to them. But I think most people don't do multiple-thousand-dollar data recoveries, that that's probably excessive.

SP

Beta1
07-05-2005, 11:22:54
given how cheap hard drives are I would have thought the most sensible option would be to take out the drive dismantle it with the aid of a large sledge hammer and then burn the bits.

Like to see them try and reconsitiute that.

Cruddy
07-05-2005, 13:11:52
Bah. Thermite will do the job without dismantling or using a hammer.

Dump a computer on the streets in Amsterdam and the cyber kraaken will have it away before your footsteps grow cold.

He was an idiot with no idea of street culture whatsoever.

Drekkus
10-05-2005, 12:12:59
hey! My story is in there!!

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2005/04/27/netherlands_ipod_tax/

I wrote a letter at work to the PM protesting against the proposed tax. The press release with that sparked the whole media attention.

Gary
10-05-2005, 12:52:34
Bully for you ! http://www.counterglow.com/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif

Deacon
11-05-2005, 07:08:48
A levy because of the possibility of pirating. By that logic, since MacGuyver can make all kinds of impromptu devices, all hardware should be subject to an anti-piracy levy.

Drekkus
11-05-2005, 12:02:15
Officially, the levie is for making a legal copy, which is allowed by law. But now they use the excuse that it's because of piracy.

Beta1
11-05-2005, 13:02:14
if its a legal copy why the levy?

Drekkus
11-05-2005, 14:08:26
A legal copy doesn't mean it's for free.

Gary
11-05-2005, 14:30:59
Maybe not, but you would have put the work in yourself, and supplying the materials to copy to, so you should be the one receiving the levy.

Drekkus
11-05-2005, 14:46:10
Good thinking.:D It's just a compensation for the copyright holder. But i think in english law there's no legal copy allowed. Therefor there aren't any levies.

Gary
11-05-2005, 16:03:36
I believe that to be true for the UK, not that I believe laws should be slavishly followed anyway. One needs to cultivate the chaotic good side of things ;)

Compensation eh ? Can't say I see what there is to compensate for, if it's a copy for one's own use of something already bought. That's normal "fair use" IMNSHO.

Deacon
12-05-2005, 07:13:31
Zero-sum gamers from the entertainment companies would see free copies as money lost instead of money not made.

Gary
12-05-2005, 08:15:10
It's neither if you bought the software already. I suspect legal copies are not for distribution.

Funko
12-05-2005, 09:49:45
Originally posted by Gary
I believe that to be true for the UK, not that I believe laws should be slavishly followed anyway. One needs to cultivate the chaotic good side of things ;)

I might just murder you a little bit. Don't really believe laws should be slavishly followed!

Gary
12-05-2005, 11:10:21
And you're of the impression that qualifies as "good" ?

Hmmm.. love to see what you'd do if they passed a law making killing all your first born compulsory. Come back King Herod, all is forgiven.

Funko
12-05-2005, 11:14:51
I think it's ok to murder times new roman users. Makes the world a better place.

That's the problem with selectively ignoring the laws you don't happen to like. Someone else might not like a law you think is important...

Gary
12-05-2005, 11:49:50
Then they are entitled to argue their case. But ultimately one is responsible for one's own actions even though, as some soldiers found in Nuremberg, some circumstances make one feel that choice is theoretical only.

zmama
12-05-2005, 12:00:16
Nuremberg?

Should't you be living in the present and not the past?

Funko
12-05-2005, 12:35:24
Originally posted by Gary
Then they are entitled to argue their case. But ultimately one is responsible for one's own actions.

Exactly and you can argue your case about not being able to make a legal backup but that doesn't mean you can't get fined etc. :beer:

Gary
12-05-2005, 15:09:26
True, in the end might wins out over right, no matter how much society thinks that part of the past.

Gary
12-05-2005, 15:10:44
Should't you be living in the present and not the past?

I should look for examples in the future maybe ? Or maybe refuse to touch anything older than last week.

zmama
12-05-2005, 23:03:26
;) just giving you back your own words

Gary
13-05-2005, 08:32:56
I see. Most amusing.

But I'd argue that examples to illustrate a point have to be from the past. The better the example, the more reason to choose it regardless of date.

But the important thing is that the situation should call for an example to be given, perhaps to support an argument. That's somewhat different from dragging up something particular on an annual basis to mock your neighbours with.

JM^3
16-05-2005, 16:19:40
isn't this a good thing?

"he had trouble staying away from little boys"

Jon Miller

Immortal Wombat
16-05-2005, 16:31:29
Damn primary school teachers