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Fergus & The Brazen Car
27-04-2005, 11:22:28
Returning to Great Britain has been great fun; opening up packing boxes of books, c.d.s, clothes, magazines, and coming across little gems that I'd forgotten I had when I was in Melbourne.


Like this Aldine Paperback, 'Is Thy Name Wart ?' by James Pennethorne Hughes- all about the origins of curious and occasionally rude sounding surnames.


Mine are quite pedestrian: on my mother's side, 'descendant of sea warrior' and on my father's side, 'descendant of war'. Hoo ha, peaceable clans my lot.


So come on then, share your surnames and let's see what they mean and where they come from.

JM^3
27-04-2005, 11:26:22
my name is Jon Miller

Jon Miller

mr.G
27-04-2005, 11:26:55
Heymans


goddammit, by the power of greyskullllllll

Funko
27-04-2005, 11:32:35
Mine:

Theory 1: from an honorific for the gaellic for "Horse lord"
Theory 2: a bardish flourish on the old gaelic "Ernan" or "Earnan" ("the Wise One").
Theory 3: The most awesome theory of all it means "Spawn of Hell"

A few other random theories

Final theory: derivation of the Graeco-Latin "Hivernen"a late variant of "lerne" or "Hibernia"

In full here if you can really be bothered reading it:

http://www.esatclear.ie/~dougheff/heffernan/clan_heffernan_History.html

Oh and my name is spelled slightly differently to that, they spelt my grandad's birth certificate wrong.

Kitsuki
27-04-2005, 11:35:18
All of those sound cool Funko - mine however -

According to Dr. F. De Brabandere, author of the monumental work "Dictionary of family names in Belgium and Northern France", the name "Sammels" is a nickname for somebody who "sammels", i.e. someone who lingers, moans, bungles...

Fuck that! I want to be a Horse Lord, or Wise One, or even the Spawn of Hell...! Can I borrow one?

Funko
27-04-2005, 11:37:49
No you can't you lingering, moaning bungler!

Fergus & The Brazen Car
27-04-2005, 11:40:48
Millar is a Scots form of Miller.

Miller is an alteration from 'Milner', from Old English Milne meaning 'at the mill'.

Miller was the 11th commonest surname in Scotland in 1958, fifth in the U.S.A. in 1939.


Closest to Heymans is Hay and its variations, or the Irish O'Hea.

Kitsuki
27-04-2005, 11:41:04
I'll get round to moaning about that insult later, if I don't mess up my keyboard in the process.

JM^3
27-04-2005, 11:43:35
how about Priddy, Roberts, and Fulture (might not spell this last one right)

Jon Miller

mr.G
27-04-2005, 11:44:25
heijmans, dutch > english heij = hij = he
so i am Heman,

http://www.mattel.de/images/pr/heman.jpg

eat that WISE ONE

Sir Penguin
27-04-2005, 11:47:31
MacMillan == "Son of the Tonsured One"

SP

King_Ghidra
27-04-2005, 11:53:07
Gunns, think it's a perversion of the scottish Gunn, as in the clan and tartan of the same name: http://www.gunnclan.net/

The surname Gunn derives from Gun, Gunnar, or Gunni (depending upon the intepretation of historian) who was a grandson of Sweyn the Pirate of Freswick whose family ruled the earldoms of Orkney and Caithness during the 9th, 10th and 11th centuries.

Cruddy
27-04-2005, 11:57:39
I would as soon post a picture of my penis on a public forum and ask for criticism as post my real name.

Not that it's uncommon. Just I like the illusion of security.

zmama
27-04-2005, 12:25:14
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Gunns, think it's a perversion


jep

:lol:

zmama
27-04-2005, 12:27:20
One of my family names means roughly

go away man...in german :D

The Bursar
27-04-2005, 12:35:18
Weaver: one who weaves.

Oerdin
27-04-2005, 12:39:45
Son of Jack.

alsieboo
27-04-2005, 12:42:37
Hughes. If you can tell me what it means, I'm all ears.

DevilsH@lo
27-04-2005, 12:44:30
Carroll

http://www.electricscotland.com/webclans/scotsirish/carroll.htm

One of the 25 most common Irish surnames, Carroll comes, in the vast majority of cases, from the Irish O Cearbhaill, from Cearbhall a very popular personal name thought to mean "fierce in battle".

So don't fuck me off. :shoot:

Funko
27-04-2005, 12:45:50
I thought it was a girls first name.

DevilsH@lo
27-04-2005, 12:46:15
Originally posted by alsieboo
Hughes. If you can tell me what it means, I'm all ears.

You're all ears anyway you spock like freak!!!! :D :clueless:

alsieboo
27-04-2005, 12:47:30
Originally posted by DevilsH@lo
You're all ears anyway you spock like freak!!!! :D :clueless:

thanks a bunch! You've been really complimentary to me recently, what with calling me dangerous, and evil :p

Greg W
27-04-2005, 12:47:42
Woodstock.

I believe it means something like a bridge over a stream in some woods. Feel free to correct me if that's wrong though...

The Bursar
27-04-2005, 12:47:42
http://genealogy.about.com/library/surnames/h/bl_name-HUGHES.htm

DevilsH@lo
27-04-2005, 12:48:02
Originally posted by Funko
I thought it was a girls first name.

And that is why tax money is wasted on sending people to fucking university.

My origins are definately irish, my grandfather on dads side was an irish catholic, grandmother a scots protestant needless to say they were both disowned by their families.

alsieboo
27-04-2005, 12:50:50
Originally posted by The Bursar
http://genealogy.about.com/library/surnames/h/bl_name-HUGHES.htm

thanking you! always under the impression it was welsh, but maybe I'm just confusing that with something else.

Kitsuki
27-04-2005, 12:58:47
Someone has to have a crummier meaning surname surely...?

Funko
27-04-2005, 13:23:05
Originally posted by DevilsH@lo
And that is why tax money is wasted on sending people to fucking university.

Yes, that's the kind of thing they teach in Physics degrees isn't it.

They don't do joke recognition in the Air Force? :p

Scabrous Birdseed
27-04-2005, 13:25:41
Palme. It was a dude's first name originally, later adopted as surname by his grandsons I believe in the 17th century or thereabouts. Possibly the man was born on Palm Sunday.

Greg W
27-04-2005, 13:27:08
Or maybe he took out Mrs Palmer a lot on dates. :D

Funko
27-04-2005, 13:27:27
And her five daughters?

Venom
27-04-2005, 13:30:00
Mine means I like cake.

JM^3
27-04-2005, 13:33:47
but you got the name because you liked what came with the cake

JM

Venom
27-04-2005, 13:46:26
Ice cream.

Funko
27-04-2005, 13:46:48
I thought he meant the waitress.

MoSe
27-04-2005, 13:47:46
did she really come?

Funko
27-04-2005, 13:48:25
It was really good cake.

mr.G
27-04-2005, 13:49:13
Originally posted by alsieboo
Hughes. If you can tell me what it means, I'm all ears. it means huge so like your ears and all.

zmama
27-04-2005, 13:50:23
Originally posted by Funko
It was really good cake.

Had to have been chocolate cake then

MoSe
27-04-2005, 13:52:34
she could always simulate, if required

Venom
27-04-2005, 13:53:00
It's never me. It's always the cake.

Funko
27-04-2005, 13:54:27
Originally posted by zmama
Had to have been chocolate cake then

Is there another kind?

zmama
27-04-2005, 13:55:54
no

Greg W
27-04-2005, 13:56:57
Cheesecake! :love:

zmama
27-04-2005, 13:59:38
oh yeah forgot that one :o

Tizzy
27-04-2005, 14:00:05
Damnit, I'm thinking like a drunk Aussie again!!

Greg W
27-04-2005, 14:01:21
Originally posted by Tizzy
Damnit, I'm thinking like a drunk Aussie again!! X-Fear, but I want to quote that for posterity! :beer:

Tizzy
27-04-2005, 14:02:26
What, a whole thread to that effect wasn't enough?

MoSe
27-04-2005, 14:02:31
Anyway, this is all very much interesting.
But no online coverage of my surname alas.

For your amusement, I'd say that it literally translates to "ringy" in the sense of the sound, although it's not a word in the dictionary. Its root is, and means ring, and in italian it's also a mild slang for "call-girl", for the joy of my sister and the jokes and mocking she had to endure in high-school.

In english (going by spelling instead of sense) it can easily be transformed in "squid lace" or "skill ace" :coolgrin: (or quill ace or quill lace if you ignore the initial).

Another possible intepretation takes from Schillaci (yes, the italian sicilian football striker from Italy '90 WC), which could mean "from Scylla". The name writing would have then transformed by drifting up north to Naples.

Greg W
27-04-2005, 14:04:28
Originally posted by Tizzy
What, a whole thread to that effect wasn't enough? More is always good. :beer:

Oerdin
27-04-2005, 14:48:34
Originally posted by alsieboo
Hughes. If you can tell me what it means, I'm all ears.

Definition: 1) Son of Hugh (Hugh is a Germanic name meaning "heart/mind," often after Saint Hugh. 2) Possibly a modern form of the ancient Irish name "O'HAY."

Surname Origin: English

Alternate Surname Spellings: HUGH, HUGHE

JM^3
27-04-2005, 14:50:21
you forgot HUGE

JM

mr.G
27-04-2005, 14:52:16
Originally posted by mr.G
it means huge so like your ears and all.

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-04-2005, 17:42:37
Woodland- attached to people who worked in the woods, funnily enough. Probably charcoal-burners.

It's proof that I am the descendant of a very long line of dull peasants.

Lurker
27-04-2005, 17:59:38
Mine has two definitions: "stud of studs" and "recidivist". I like the first one better.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
27-04-2005, 18:03:52
My family name simply means people who live in corners.

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-04-2005, 19:33:02
Spiders? Dunces?

Venom
27-04-2005, 19:44:39
Site #1: Life. Taken from the Italian Vidal
http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_last_names.htm#V

Site #2: Some Lord of the Manor from Devonshire
http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/asp.fc/qx/vitale-family-crest.htm

BigGameHunter
27-04-2005, 21:15:35
Well...I'm adopted, so there are several to choose from:

The German:

http://www.heraldry.jerasys.com/Germany/Bernhard_t.jpg

Meaning "Germanic given name Bernhard, from the elements ber = bear + hard = brave, hardy. The
name was introduced to England by the conquering Normans in 1066".

The Irish:

http://www.allfamilycrests.com/c/cleary.gif

Meaning: "From the Gaelic Cleireach, a clerk, a clergyman, a writer. A noted family of historians whose estates were in the county of Donnegal, Ireland."

English:

http://www.antiquesandfineart.com/dealers/D.40/inventory/images/large/I.6694.jpg?x=0.65701806

Meaning "from Old English dēmung ‘judgement’, ‘act of judging’, hence a metonymic occupational name for a judge or for an arbiter of minor disputes. Compare Deemer and Deem."

English again:

http://store1.yimg.com/I/4crests_1841_14011365

Meaning: " An abbreviation of courteous. It may be from Curthose, a name given for wearing short hose, as the name Curtmantle was given to Henry the Second of England, from his introducing the fashion of wearing shorter mantles than had been previously used".

There's also Arringdale, Moon, Venus and Bruce....

Qaj the Fuzzy Love Worm
27-04-2005, 22:22:33
BARKER - Name Meaning & Origin

Definition: 1) A tanner of leather, derived from Middle English "bark," meaning to tan 2) From the Old French "berquier, berchier, bercher, berkier, berker," meaning shepherd. 3) A variant of the German surname Berger, used to describe a man who lived on or by a hill or mountain, from the Old High German "berg," meaning mountain.

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-04-2005, 22:27:16
Originally posted by Venom

Site #2: Some Lord of the Manor from Devonshire
http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/asp.fc/qx/vitale-family-crest.htm


Ahahahahahahaha. Devon.

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-04-2005, 22:29:54
Shit.

http://www.houseofnames.com/coatofarms_details.asp?sId=&s=Woodland

Devon again. That means Venom's ancestors probably exercised droit de seigneur on mine.

[QUOTE]

Lazarus and the Gimp
27-04-2005, 22:36:11
Good God. My Grandmother's maiden name was "Plenty", which was apparently derived from "Plantagenet". I'm royalty, dammit.

Grossly perverted and nasty royalty at that....

Martini
27-04-2005, 22:53:52
Something tells me my surname may be related to a tree.

On the more interesting side, apparently my family motto is 'simply prudent' :lol:

Venom
27-04-2005, 23:22:40
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
Shit.

http://www.houseofnames.com/coatofarms_details.asp?sId=&s=Woodland

Devon again. That means Venom's ancestors probably exercised droit de seigneur on mine.



All your women are belong to us.

MoSe
28-04-2005, 08:53:12
Originally posted by Venom
Site #1: Life. Taken from the Italian Vidal
http://mizian.com.ne.kr/englishwiz/library/names/etymology_of_last_names.htm#V

Vidal's not italian, it's spanish
actually I think that the link meant Vidal was taken from the italian 'vitale'.
whithout going too far, it's just the same as the english 'vital', as in full of life.
FULL of life.

mr.G
28-04-2005, 08:55:40
so it is vitaal?

MoSe
28-04-2005, 08:57:34
A vital venom, interesting oxymoron.
And I'd ignore the oxy part.

Oerdin
28-04-2005, 09:42:16
http://www.houseofnames.com/coatofarms_details.asp?sId=&s=jackson

It seems my grandfather's family migrated from Northumberland to Scotland in the late 1600's or at least that's what the family tree says. The family's origin in Northumberland seems to be confirmed by this website.

Fergus & The Brazen Car
28-04-2005, 13:21:58
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Gunns, think it's a perversion of the scottish Gunn, as in the clan and tartan of the same name: http://www.gunnclan.net/


Could well be.

Seems to be from Old Norse, as a first name it means 'war, battle'.

Sometimes it was an abbreviation of the female 'Gunnhildr', 'battle battle', believe it or not, whence ultimately 'gun' in Modern English.


Who'd have guessed, another Scots-Norse name about having a barney. ;)

Greg W
28-04-2005, 13:24:59
So, what's Woodstock mean? :hmm:

Fergus & The Brazen Car
28-04-2005, 13:26:26
Originally posted by alsieboo
Hughes. If you can tell me what it means, I'm all ears.


Hugh as a forename means 'heart, mind'. From the Germanic, popularized by St. Hugh of Avalon, prior of Witham and Bishop of Lincoln, and also by the anti-semitic cult of the martyred child Hugh of Lincoln (mentioned by Chaucer).


'Hughes' or 'son of Hugh', is one of the commonest surnames in Noth Wales, 19th commonest in England & Wales in 1853, 85th in Scotland in 1958, 34th in Ireland in 1890.

For saints, Hugh & Hugh sure were busy fertilizers....

Fergus & The Brazen Car
28-04-2005, 13:28:10
Originally posted by Greg W
Woodstock.

I believe it means something like a bridge over a stream in some woods. Feel free to correct me if that's wrong though...

From the Old English, originally a local name, meaning 'a place in the woods'; related to Stock & Stoke.

Greg W
28-04-2005, 13:30:16
Woo, I am a place in the woods. :D

Well, I was close anyway. Cheers. :)

Fergus & The Brazen Car
28-04-2005, 13:31:26
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Palme. It was a dude's first name originally, later adopted as surname by his grandsons I believe in the 17th century or thereabouts. Possibly the man was born on Palm Sunday.

As a nickname in Old French, 'Palmer' means 'pilgrim', someone who brought back a palm-branch from the Holy Land. It is also the family name of the Earls of Selborne.

Also features in the title of a Philip K. Dick novel, 'The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch'.