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Dyl Ulenspiegel
26-04-2005, 10:04:07
How would you best express the fact that a right covers two sides of an issue or that it just covers one side? Concrete: A product or person crossing a border based on a right against the target state, or against target and origin state.

multilateral or multipronged (vs single-pronged?) don't seem right. Twosidedness sounds crappy, too. Any ideas?

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:07:01
bilateral and unilateral?

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:08:08
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=bilateral
http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=unilateral

I think that looks right... your description was a bit confusing though. :)

Cruddy
26-04-2005, 10:10:24
How about balanced? Or unbalanced?

The usual expression is "checks and balances on a law". So that the law covers both sides of an issue.

EDIT: There's the word biased as well, to describe an unfair situation. Or unbiased to describe a fair situation.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
26-04-2005, 10:18:15
Originally posted by Funko
bilateral and unilateral?

Unfortunately, they have a distinct meaning in law that they involve one or two parties - that's not what I'm trying to say.

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:19:41
I don't really understand what you are trying to say if that wasn't it...

Dyl Ulenspiegel
26-04-2005, 10:33:57
Ok...

1. I have a right to export to country B (B must not stop me; but what my home country A does is beyond the scope of my right)
2. I have a right to export from country A to country B (neither A nor B may stop me)

mr.G
26-04-2005, 10:34:41
Dyl, what is the german word?

Cruddy
26-04-2005, 10:34:49
Controlled and uncontrolled exports?

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:36:23
Hmmm.

I don't know. I can't say I've ever even considered those concepts. :) Sorry.

mr.G
26-04-2005, 10:42:35
Originally posted by Dyl Ulenspiegel
Ok...

1. I have a right to export to country B (B must not stop me; but what my home country A does is beyond the scope of my right)
2. I have a right to export from country A to country B (neither A nor B may stop me) ask Venom to fix it.

Dyl Ulenspiegel
26-04-2005, 10:43:18
Originally posted by mr.G
Dyl, what is the german word?

In german, you can use "einseitig" and "beidseitig" as the meaning much more open than uni-/bilateral.

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:47:23
Once sided and reciprocal?

mr.G
26-04-2005, 10:51:35
reciprocally

mr.G
26-04-2005, 10:52:00
One-sided

Funko
26-04-2005, 10:54:18
I think literally it's one sided and both sided, but babelfish came up with reciprocally for beidseitig.

MoSe
26-04-2005, 10:54:22
Originally posted by Funko
Once sided

Once sided, you'll never get back into the ceter of a girl's consideration

mr.G
26-04-2005, 10:56:11
http://www.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html

MoSe
26-04-2005, 10:56:59
ummmm.... may I invent a "Target-scoped" vs "omnicomprehensive, all-covering" right?

I know, that's not even resembling english, not even by far and by mistake....

Funko
26-04-2005, 11:01:27
The problem with Dyl's questions are that I don't know enough law!

mr.G
26-04-2005, 11:04:35
I fought it but it won.

mr.G
26-04-2005, 11:05:26
One-sided vs reciprocally, that is what he needed that son of an owlkiller.

MoSe
26-04-2005, 12:15:14
nice logo the worldlingo page (those bastards made it impossible to download... I hadto capture it from the screen)

What's it, a burp after a hangover???
;)

mr.G
26-04-2005, 12:17:13
No it means if you put squares into your ears you burp circles, Izzzzz you stupid or something?

MoSe
26-04-2005, 12:20:43
yez, I zzzzzz!

Fergus & The Brazen Car
26-04-2005, 12:42:35
I believe these English terms best cover your legal needs:


flanged, thrips, breastsummer and flapdoodle.


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You will be invoiced 3, 500.99 shortly.

Venom
26-04-2005, 12:59:43
Dyl's description sucked. Carry on.