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View Full Version : what animal has the longest egg to hatching period?


Drekkus
14-04-2005, 14:35:49
well??

Lurker
14-04-2005, 14:41:15
The flat-beaked maspodean.

Funko
14-04-2005, 14:41:25
Argentinosaurus

MoSe
14-04-2005, 14:44:47
You're talking of egg-laying animals of course.
Non iterested in mammalian fuck-to-birth period?

Lurker
14-04-2005, 14:51:02
"Hatching" generally rules that out.

Funko
14-04-2005, 14:52:39
Teri

MoSe
14-04-2005, 14:53:58
Originally posted by Lurker
"Hatching" generally rules that out.
well, coming out of a hatch, or a snatch, same difference... :cute:

Lurker
14-04-2005, 14:54:57
I wouldn't want to be a carton of eggs in your refrigerator, then, if that's what you think.

Drekkus
14-04-2005, 14:57:06
:lol:

Venom
14-04-2005, 16:00:47
It's obviously whatever species chicken egg is in my refrigerator. Those bastards haven't hatched in at least a year.

King_Ghidra
14-04-2005, 17:07:21
Originally posted by MoSe
well, coming out of a hatch, or a snatch, same difference... :cute:

:lol:

protein
14-04-2005, 17:14:15
http://www.upali.ch/bilder1/embryo-02.jpg

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 17:40:01
The longest of any non-extinct species is the tuatara. 15 months.

MDA
14-04-2005, 17:48:32
Is that your ~final~ answer?

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 17:51:03
Only if it's the ~correct~ answer.

protein
14-04-2005, 17:51:24
elephant 18-22 months

protein
14-04-2005, 17:52:01
IW, is that klingon under your name?

Venom
14-04-2005, 17:52:40
You dork.

MDA
14-04-2005, 17:53:02
I'm wondering about insects in harsh climates - I'll bet some of them hang around for longer periods under non-ideal growing conditions.

Oerdin
14-04-2005, 17:54:37
Originally posted by Lurker
"Hatching" generally rules that out.

Duck-Billed Platypus

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 17:55:50
I assumed Drekkus meant oviparous animal rather than viviparous animal. Mammalian eggs don't hatch.

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 17:56:45
Originally posted by protein
IW, is that klingon under your name?
Arabic.

protein
14-04-2005, 17:57:17
Originally posted by MDA
I'm wondering about insects in harsh climates - I'll bet some of them hang around for longer periods under non-ideal growing conditions.
Good call. I've definately heard of that sort of thing.

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 17:58:55
19-year locust plagues. Though that might be dormant larvae., not eggs.

protein
14-04-2005, 17:59:05
Originally posted by Immortal Wombat
Arabic.
same thing.

Oerdin
14-04-2005, 17:59:54
Egg laying and it has poison venom. They are one strange animal.


DUCK-BILLED PLATYPUS (MONOTREME)
Among all the monotremes, or egg-laying mammals, the duck-billed platypus (subclass Holotheria, genus Ornithorhynchus) is perhaps the most familiar species. Like all mammals, the duck-billed platypus is endothermic, meaning it generates its own internal body heat. However, its metabolic rate and body temperature are lower than those of most other mammals.

The duck-billed platypus is also one of the rare venomous mammals. A spike on its ankle contains a poison that is injected when the meat-eating platypus attacks a small animal.

Functioning similar to birds, monotremes incubate their one to three eggs outside the body of the mother. Another similarity to birds is that the platypus does not possess teeth.

Incubation lasts about 12 days, after which the monotreme young use a "milk tooth" to carve themselves free from within an egg.

Milk produced by a mother's mammary gland is secreted onto the skin within the pouch and sucked or lapped up by the babies. Weaning of the young happens at 16 to 20 weeks of age.

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 18:00:42
Brine shrimp eggs can lie dormant for 10 or even 25 years, yet burst to life when the rains finally come.

protein
14-04-2005, 18:03:20
That's ages.

Those duck-billed bastards are weird.

Immortal Wombat
14-04-2005, 18:03:28
12 days is a pretty small incubation period.

Oerdin
14-04-2005, 18:04:34
We have a shit load of those brine shrimp around here. Developers hate them because there are so many different species of them and half are endangered. That means the eviromentalists have a hand way to stop development if they can find a puddle of water with a few of those short lived shrimp in them.

HelloKitty
14-04-2005, 18:25:49
I would have thought it was the babies Venom puts in plastic eggs. They never get out.

MDA
14-04-2005, 18:34:59
The cicada/locust thingys are larval for those years.

the brine shrimp thing is cool. Sea monkeys!

Oerdin
14-04-2005, 18:35:28
They start to stink after a while too.

MDA
14-04-2005, 18:38:09
But they don't fling their poo at you.

Venom
14-04-2005, 21:35:47
The Platypus (does it really need to be called duck billed? Are there more platypi?) is the most awesome creature on earth.

Lurker
14-04-2005, 22:13:54
I have to disagree. It's boobs are most unimpressive.

Venom
14-04-2005, 22:43:47
While human boobs are mighty impressive, the noise hole associated with the carrier of the boobs is decidedly annoying.

Christoph
14-04-2005, 23:13:33
God was having a laugh when he made the platypus.

Japher
14-04-2005, 23:21:35
Not as long as the tautara, or whatever

Komodo dragons have an unusually long incubation period-about eight months, which is not only longer than any other reptile, but also longer than one would expect for the size of their eggs.

Reiber points out that the long incubation time suggests a high cost of development, but by reptilian standards, the energy source-the yolk of the egg-is not large enough to provide enough food for such a lengthy period.