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Funkodrom
15-11-2004, 11:20:45
http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/news/story/0,11711,1351212,00.html

Asked to record a personal message in 1984, Spandau Ballet's sax player famously said "hi" to all their fans in Africa and promised to tour Ethiopia the following year.

The first Band Aid single raised 8m in aid for Africa and kick-started Live Aid, the global pop concert which raised more than 60m for charity. As Geldof said yesterday, last time was "mayhem and chaos". Stars drove themselves to the studio; Boy George was woken up in New York and told to catch Concorde to arrive in time; Status Quo were said to have shared out a big bag of cocaine in the toilets.

This time, under the watchful gaze of paparazzi and PRs, there was nothing more potent than a vat of tortilla chips handed out.

Sounds like it was more fun last time.

Although I'm interested to hear what the Dizzee Rascall/Darkness bit sounds like.

Drekkus
15-11-2004, 16:06:13
"Asked to record a personal message in 1984, Spandau Ballet's sax player famously said "hi" to all their fans in Africa and promised to tour Ethiopia the following year."

:lol: I actually bought the 12" version back then. Traded it with a friend for some other crappy album later.

Lazarus and the Gimp
15-11-2004, 17:34:44
"Last time"? Has the first remake been written out of history? I hope so, because it was awful.

Lazarus and the Gimp
15-11-2004, 17:35:06
Then again, the original was crap too.

Scabrous Birdseed
15-11-2004, 19:25:44
Have you read the lyrics? Good lord. Who wrote that? Were they being sarcastic?

Lazarus and the Gimp
15-11-2004, 20:30:33
Funny, isn't it? Coming from Bob Geldof and Midge Ure you might expect something a bit spikey or atmospheric, but instead it's just a monstrous great turd of a song.

Provost Harrison
16-11-2004, 00:01:24
I suppose it is all about sentiment really...

Provost Harrison
16-11-2004, 00:02:37
...Besides sing something like 'Do They Know It's Christmas Time?' to Tanzania or Sudan and the reply would most likely be 'Yes, but we don't give a flying fuck, we're moslems...'...

Angelhorns
16-11-2004, 00:31:46
Its a great song. It has mass appeal, it gets the message across, its catchy, it does what its meant to do, its of its time.

I don't think any remake will be as poignant as the first one. Plus a lot of people now say the band aid money did more harm than good to Ethiopia, so not sure about wisdom of doing another.

Scabrous Birdseed
16-11-2004, 07:27:17
It's Christmastime,
there's no need to be afraid
At Christmastime,
we let in light and we banish shade
And in our world of plenty
we can spread a smile of joy
Throw your arms around the world
at Christmastime

Yes, rejoice at your material wealth, people! Hooray for Capitalism!

Well tonight thank God it's them
instead of you

Obviously, it's impossible to distribute wealth so that everyone gets a share. We're really thankful for the market and that it has given us the advantage. Social change? Pah. Three cheers for "charity"!


And there won't be snow in Africa this Christmastime
The greatest gift they'll get this year is life(Oooh)
Where nothing ever grows
No rain or rivers flow
Do they know it's Christmastime at all?

Because, as we know:

(a) Christmas is about snow. Jolly English snow. None of that foreign muck.

(b) Africa is exactly as described above. All of it. Ignorant, starving heathens the lot of them. We need to go down there and colonise, er, I mean, "feed" them.

Funkodrom
16-11-2004, 09:54:32
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
Have you read the lyrics? Good lord. Who wrote that? Were they being sarcastic?

I know. They really are terrible aren't they - especially the

"Well tonight thank God it's them instead of you"

Oh and the "Do they know it's Christmas time" - I don't know, let's ask the 50% of the Ethiopian population who are Muslims...

Debaser
16-11-2004, 10:47:38
I think you're taking the "Well tonight thank God it's them instead of you"line the wrong way Mike. I always presumed it was supposed to be a scathing attack on the apathetic attitude of the British public at large, trying to embarrass people into doing something good. What's wrong with that? Granted the "snow if Africa" line is shit, but then so was pretty much every song written by Bob Geldof or Midge Ure.

Funkodrom
16-11-2004, 11:36:58
You may well be right.

Provost Harrison
16-11-2004, 12:52:18
...the "where nothing ever grows" line is utter bullshit too...Africa is a pretty fertile land for the most part...

protein
16-11-2004, 13:11:57
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
(a) Christmas is about snow. Jolly English snow. None of that foreign muck.
The song was written by a Scot. More Scandanavian than English. :p

I think Debaser was right about the "thank god" line.

Gramercy Riffs
16-11-2004, 13:34:02
Originally posted by Debaser
Granted the "snow if Africa" line is shit, but then so was pretty much every song written by Bob Geldof or Midge Ure.

Vienna was good.

But the Live Aid song is very shit granted.

Debaser
16-11-2004, 13:48:14
Vienna's probably the most bland dreary song I've ever heard. Why is it so slow?

Funkodrom
16-11-2004, 13:58:32
That was the fastest they could play.

The Bursar
16-11-2004, 17:55:47
http://www.boasas.com/boasas/17.gif

Angelhorns
16-11-2004, 21:25:33
you're all such wanky armchair critics. I'd love to see any of you write a song thats retained its value 20 years later and becomes an instant classic that gets played every Christmas, let alone raises awareness nd money on such a huge scale. And you aren't meant to take every lyric as literal, some are metaphoric. :)

Debaser is right about that line Mike. Thats why Bono didnt want to sing it, he was worried people would take it the wrong way. I think its a really powerful line because basically, its how people feel, and its shaming.

Angelhorns
16-11-2004, 21:30:05
Originally posted by Provost Harrison
...the "where nothing ever grows" line is utter bullshit too...Africa is a pretty fertile land for the most part...

Some campaigners think the Live Aid appeal damaged AFrica's economy because it was effectively bad press for a whole continent, which has ironically perpetuated the problems of poverty and lack of resources.

Resource Consumer
16-11-2004, 23:13:53
We are in danger of confusing the act of raising the money with how it is spent.

Sure, a lot of money was and is spent badly and for political reasons (buying up EU food mountains and dumping that on agrarian economies comes to mind - as well as the concomitant "so why did they not plant next year?" plaintive calls).

The issue is why do you raise money in such cases

1) to alleviate immediate starvation
2) to develop long-term growth
3) to get a fund to buy up EU's surplus stocks
4) to get your face on TV
5) because you look good 'cos you ain't in government

Frankly, I find partial solutions cretinous and insulting. I do not mind subscribing my hard-earned dosh towards something that is worthwhile but too often (whatever the source) the refrain is "dosh first", "we'll work out what to do with it" and "consequences, what consequences, we'll worry about it later when it is off the TV screens of you turds with the grashopper memorys"

Funkodrom
17-11-2004, 09:26:36
Originally posted by Angelhorns
you're all such wanky armchair critics. I'd love to see any of you write a song thats retained its value 20 years later and becomes an instant classic that gets played every Christmas, let alone raises awareness nd money on such a huge scale.

I agree it's retained it's value.

I just don't think we agree on what it's value is.

And of course we could, it's a bad song that's just been made famous because of what it was/who's on it. Anyway you don't have to be able to do something to be able to justifiably criticise it.

Lazarus and the Gimp
17-11-2004, 17:46:09
Originally posted by Angelhorns
you're all such wanky armchair critics. I'd love to see any of you write a song thats retained its value 20 years later and becomes an instant classic that gets played every Christmas, let alone raises awareness nd money on such a huge scale.

It had the killer double whammy- it was a Christmas song and it was a charity song. Two good factors that cause one's normal standards of taste to nosedive dramatically.

I'm also not sure it succeeded in raising awareness. The drought in Zimbabwe was actually far worse than the one in Eritrea, but nobody starved. It was war that caused the famine, not drought, and I don't recall that fact coming out much.

Still, it did a lot of good deeds and for that we should be grateful, even if the song was rubbish from an aesthetic standpoint.

*End Is Forever*
17-11-2004, 18:22:16
I hope the song raises a lot of money because from reading the accounts of the recording it sounds like the whole thing was an excuse to indulge in rampant egotism (*cough* Justin Hawkins *cough*)...

Rodgers
25-11-2004, 12:34:07
Originally posted by Scabrous Birdseed
[B]Yes, rejoice at your material wealth, people! Hooray for Capitalism!

Obviously, it's impossible to distribute wealth so that everyone gets a share. We're really thankful for the market and that it has given us the advantage. Social change? Pah. Three cheers for "charity"!






While I dont disagree with the idea that the 3rd World is being fucked over by Capitalism, it is worth pointing out that at the time of the Ethiopian famine that country was being run by a Communist Government whose corruption and mismanagement had exaccerbated the drought to disastrous levels.

Lazarus and the Gimp
25-11-2004, 20:40:18
Well I've no particular wish to come across as Karl Marx, but I think the fact that a civil war was going on had a rather more drastic effect than the ideological issues....

simpleton
26-11-2004, 09:28:45
I feel it was very wrong to re-record this track.

The original was conceived, recorded and manufactured in a very short time. They could have even released a heavy metal track and it still would have sold. The feeling in the country at the time was that something had to be done and Bob and Midge did something.

I actually really like the original, it never fails to bring out the goosebumps. Simple tune, simple lyrics that were meant to show how lucky we were in the developed world as opposed to the starving millions. The song had to appeal to all age groups.

The Bono line is a total selfish line that was to make us feel guilty - the "I'm alright Jack" type attitude.

I am worried that releasing the Live Aid DVD set will also tarnish the whole feel, it will not be the same. The original day was incredible, no traffic on the streets, people watching the whole thing. (like a mixture of the world cup final, Diana's funeral, Royal wedding etc). I watched it with all my mates going from one house to the other. At one point, I looked around the room and I was glad to see that I was not the only 15 year old crying, everyone was. The feeling of the day will never be captured by simply showing a stage show that was at times really crap.

Rodgers
29-11-2004, 13:16:38
Well, they brought back "Come Dancing" and that wasn't half as good as the original either.

Debaser
29-11-2004, 14:19:24
And let us not forget that the Live Aid single has been re-recorded once already back in the early 90s with loads of crappy SAW artists like Big Fun, Jason Donovan, and Sonia. The new version is infinately better than that surely....

Provost Harrison
29-11-2004, 22:59:36
And what the fuck is that awful rap in the middle of it for?

Funkodrom
30-11-2004, 10:07:35
That's the sound of one of the leading lights of one of the most exciting genres in the world at the moment. (c) Scabby 2004

The Mad Monk
04-12-2004, 06:44:31
Originally posted by simpleton
I feel it was very wrong to re-record this track.

The original was conceived, recorded and manufactured in a very short time. They could have even released a heavy metal track and it still would have sold. The feeling in the country at the time was that something had to be done and Bob and Midge did something.

I actually really like the original, it never fails to bring out the goosebumps. Simple tune, simple lyrics that were meant to show how lucky we were in the developed world as opposed to the starving millions. The song had to appeal to all age groups.

The Bono line is a total selfish line that was to make us feel guilty - the "I'm alright Jack" type attitude.

I am worried that releasing the Live Aid DVD set will also tarnish the whole feel, it will not be the same. The original day was incredible, no traffic on the streets, people watching the whole thing. (like a mixture of the world cup final, Diana's funeral, Royal wedding etc). I watched it with all my mates going from one house to the other. At one point, I looked around the room and I was glad to see that I was not the only 15 year old crying, everyone was. The feeling of the day will never be captured by simply showing a stage show that was at times really crap.

:beer: