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Help TCO
06-07-2004, 01:47:25
(please don't let moderators send this to another forum)

10. Lost Horizon by James Hilton

A 1930's classic of adventure, love and spiritual mystery. 4 passengers in a plane land in a magic valley in Tibet called Shangri-la.

9. Red Sky at Dawn by Bradford

The "better version" of Catcher in the Rye. And the "better version" of the Milagro Beanfield War. Story of an 18-year-old boy and his mother in the early 40's in Northern New Mexico.

8. The Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander

Imagine a cross between The Lord of the Rings and the Chronicles of Narnia. Lots of adventure, but lots of lessons about what true heroism is (as opposed to the image of glory). Written for young people, but enjoyable to all ages as all great children's books are. Girls will like it too--there is a prominent female character. Based on Welsh Mythology (loosely).

7. Sands of the Sahara by Bodley

True story of a disillusioned British officer after WW1, who goes soul-searching by living as a Beduin for 7 years. "More Lawrence than Lawrence".

6. Thank You for Smoking by Chris Buckley

A satire about a "pro-smoking" advocate. Probably his funniest and most engaging novel. Will appeal to most conservatives and some liberals.

5. Way of the Pilgrim by Gordon Dickson

Maybe my favorite of all time. An adventure of rebellion by earthlings against alien conquerers. Dickson always is more interested in soft science (psych, soc, etc) than hard science and he does a great job of translating it into the action. The rebellion is not a straight military affair but more one of intrigue and even of culture clash.

4. Run Silent Run Deep by Beach

Had to include one gung-ho submarine book. Beach rocks. He was a skipper in WW2 in the Pacific when all the great sub work of the USN was done. When I was in in the 80s, many of these guys still came to Sub Birthday balls in San Diego.

Basically fun USN book, but more special to me than to others. If this doesn't get you, substitute TALES OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC by James Michener. (forget all the tree-killers that Michener wrote. SP is short, episodic stories of what the war in the Pacific was really like. Imagine the movie and then imagine something 3 times as intriguing.)

3. Lest Darkness Fall by L Sprague de Camp

A "Connecticut Yankee" story where the hero is dropped into Gothic Rome.

2. The Chosen

Very Jewish but will appeal to goyim also. Story of 2 hassidic and liberal Jew boys who clash on a ballfield and then find friendship.

1. The Gospel according to Luke (40 pages)

Worth reading to see the story at one time. Very hard to absorb it in the little snatches that people read in mass. Whether a believer, or atheist, or in-between worth experiencing. This is the Sidharrtha of Christianity.

JM^3
06-07-2004, 01:50:01
The Prydain Chronicles

I bought it, I shoudl read it

Jon Miller

King_Ghidra
06-07-2004, 08:37:02
why shouldn't this one be moved? i don't see why people are so fucking incapable of reading and responding to the threads in the fiction forum now and again

Angelhorns
06-07-2004, 09:06:32
I dont see why all these threads were separated in the first place. Now when anyone references anything off topic everyone screams 'other forum!!'

zmama
06-07-2004, 10:25:09
because

Vincent
06-07-2004, 10:28:33
Because it's easier to find threads in the appropriate forum. And here's a lot of traffic so literature threads drop to page 2 pretty fast. And this is the blah part of the forum and not everyone is interested in books, music, sports, gaming. And these are topics with a lot of threads, so if you are interested in that you'll find the complete collection. And you may find out there has been a similar thread, especially regarding films and music. And ....

It's an amazing fact that people don't have the minimum attention required to post in the right forum .

King_Ghidra
06-07-2004, 11:14:37
Actually the funny thing is i made a thread like this back when CG first started. IIRC as a result you guys recommended Moskva-Petushki (Moscow Stations) to me. Which is a great book. :beer:

Spartak
06-07-2004, 11:18:25
Originally posted by Help TCO
(please don't let moderators send this to another forum)


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

Chris
06-07-2004, 13:39:25
Green eggs and ham.

LoD
06-07-2004, 13:47:39
The Art of War (the Sun Tzu one)

Angelhorns
06-07-2004, 14:12:25
The Story of O

Funkodrom
06-07-2004, 14:27:26
I like the idea of this thread. These recommendations could maybe do with a bit of expansion. If it's worth a recommendation I'm sure it's worth mentioning the author and maybe giving a very brief synopsis and/or reason why it's so good.

Beta1
06-07-2004, 14:51:44
Q - Luther blisset

Although everyone's probably read that one by now.

King_Ghidra
06-07-2004, 14:58:51
Originally posted by Angelhorns
The Story of O

do you genuinely recommend this as a good read?

i read Delta of Venus a few years ago, another seminal (no pun intended) work of female sexual fiction and although it was interesting and i can understand its importance as a record of female sexual expression, i wouldn't exactly say it was a riveting read.

With some books, and Ullysses is the prime example, it is almost more important that they exist than that people read them. That is, they symbolize something more important than a good story or the quality of the writing. I wondered if the Story of O is one of these.

Lazarus and the Gimp
06-07-2004, 16:11:06
Originally posted by Beta1
Q - Luther blisset

Although everyone's probably read that one by now.

I haven't. What's it like?

Lazarus and the Gimp
06-07-2004, 16:11:56
I've read "Ulysses". "Finnegan's Wake" defeated me, however.

Debaser
06-07-2004, 17:42:20
The Dirt.

Best. Rock. Biography. Ever.

MOBIUS
06-07-2004, 18:04:40
'An Ice-Cream War' (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0375705023/104-8475390-2319141?v=glance) by William Boyd

Set in WWI East Africa during the fascinating and little-known campaign waged by lieutenant colonel Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck who commanded Germany's scratch East Africa force (mostly African soldiers) and ran rings around the overwhelmingly superior numbers of attacking allied forces for the entire duration of the war. This background plunges formerly friendly European neighbours reluctantly against each other in a story of
war, love, and revenge...

Shortlisted for the Booker Prize

Funkodrom
06-07-2004, 19:06:05
Originally posted by Debaser
The Dirt.

Best. Rock. Biography. Ever.

Seconded.

Lazarus and the Gimp
06-07-2004, 20:24:02
Fah. Try "Fucked by Rock" by Mark "Zodiac Mindwarp" Manning.

Lazarus and the Gimp
06-07-2004, 20:59:26
"Riddley Walker" by Russell Hoban.

It's set in England, a very long time (thousands of years) after a devastating nuclear war, and the people being left with a vague, mystical oral history of their past.

Chris
06-07-2004, 21:10:40
Few people mention it anymore, but I always enjoy "A Cantacile for Leibowitz," a different kind of post-atomic war story.

BigGameHunter
06-07-2004, 22:10:33
Try "Deslolation Angels"--one by Jack Kerouac that doesn't usually make the "hip" list.

zmama
06-07-2004, 22:40:06
"Rats, Lice, and History: Being a Study in Biography, Which, After Twelve Preliminary Chapters Indispensable for the Preparation of the Lay Reader, Deals With the Life History"

by Hans Zinsser

It's science, it's history, it's gruesome and it's funny as hell

Angelhorns
06-07-2004, 23:34:17
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
do you genuinely recommend this as a good read?

i read Delta of Venus a few years ago, another seminal (no pun intended) work of female sexual fiction and although it was interesting and i can understand its importance as a record of female sexual expression, i wouldn't exactly say it was a riveting read.

With some books, and Ullysses is the prime example, it is almost more important that they exist than that people read them. That is, they symbolize something more important than a good story or the quality of the writing. I wondered if the Story of O is one of these.

O is like the opposite of Delta of Venus- its basically hardcore S&M porn with a kind of spiritual centre. I loved D of V though and I thought it was beautifully written and very engaging. O is less feeling but still shocking, and its more about submissive/ S&M sex from the woman's pov. I have The Sexual Life of Catherine M hanging around waiting to be read too..
I think perhaps the difference in enjoyment of these books depends on the readers sexual preferences as much as the writing. If anything O is the book that should exist regardless of writing, whereas Nin's book is a classic and her writing style, part fantasy, part reality is key.
I dunno, you can borrow Story of O off me if you want to read it.

Angelhorns
06-07-2004, 23:45:43
can I mention pride and Prejudice here? I know its a famous book but most men wont approach it. I seriously recommend it to anyone who likes social satire though. Her characters are beautifully drawn, and her plots progress gracefully and fulfillingly. This is undoubtedly my favourite book and one of the best books ever written in English.

I also like E M Forster for the same reasons, although he seems a bit forgotten these days.. but A Room with a View is a gorgeous book and an anti-Victorian love story. None of this late 20th Century doubt and cynicism for me!

oh and one I lent to Funko that I really like is Pixel Juice by Jeff Noon, which is kind of punk sci-fi. Brilliant ideas, and totally original execution. He remixes his stories. Nuts.

Help TCO
07-07-2004, 01:20:26
Originally posted by Chris
Few people mention it anymore, but I always enjoy "A Cantacile for Leibowitz," a different kind of post-atomic war story.

This rocks. It is more than just an SF adventure story. It's a story about morals and about choices and about the nature of man changing less than we think.

Help TCO
07-07-2004, 01:22:27
Originally posted by BigGameHunter
Try "Deslolation Angels"--one by Jack Kerouac that doesn't usually make the "hip" list.

I was underwhelmed by On the Road. (Are many other "road books" that I prefer.) Will I like DA?

Help TCO
07-07-2004, 01:25:07
Originally posted by Angelhorns
can I mention pride and Prejudice here? I know its a famous book but most men wont approach it. I seriously recommend it to anyone who likes social satire though. Her characters are beautifully drawn, and her plots progress gracefully and fulfillingly. This is undoubtedly my favourite book and one of the best books ever written in English.

I also like E M Forster for the same reasons, although he seems a bit forgotten these days.. but A Room with a View is a gorgeous book and an anti-Victorian love story. None of this late 20th Century doubt and cynicism for me!

oh and one I lent to Funko that I really like is Pixel Juice by Jeff Noon, which is kind of punk sci-fi. Brilliant ideas, and totally original execution. He remixes his stories. Nuts.

Austen is quite fun once you get into it. FYI: I was kicked of the Baen's bar site for saying that Austen was better than David Drake. (I may have been a bit dismissive in my language.)

Help TCO
07-07-2004, 01:53:12
Mike, I added the info.

JM^3
07-07-2004, 04:56:17
Originally posted by Help TCO
Austen is quite fun once you get into it. FYI: I was kicked of the Baen's bar site for saying that Austen was better than David Drake. (I may have been a bit dismissive in my language.)

I am not the biggest fan of Austen

but David Drake isn't very good at all

Jon Miller

JM^3
07-07-2004, 04:57:35
wait, I did read The Prydain Chronicles

several times actually

Jon Miler

fp@korea
07-07-2004, 05:21:08
Phantoms in the Brain: Human Nature and the Architecture of the Mind
by
V.S. Ramachandran, Sandra Blakeslee
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/1857028953/ref=cm_mp_wli_/026-2852251-9174845?coliid=I3P6O4645T44B6

A thoroughly absorbing look at how our brain works, how it perceives our own bodies and those of the people around us. There are some astonishing case studies described in here and it's all written in a very readable style that will appeal to a non-scientist, but it doesn't dumb down too much either. Really worth reading.

The guy who wrote it read some of the llectures that the book is based on on Radio 4 last year. They were very cool too.

JM^3
07-07-2004, 05:25:11
a few good books (I include well known ones so that people know my tastes)

Mordant's Need - Donaldson
Downbelow Station - Cherryh
Cyteen - Cherryh
Hunter of Worlds - Cherryh
Soldier ask not - Dickson
Tactics of Mistake - Dickson
Gate of Ivrel - Cherryh
Paladin - Cherryh
Wave without Shore - Cherryh
Lords of Light - Zelanzy
Jack of Shadows (been a while) - Zelanzy
Neverwhere (any UKers care to comment on the TV series?) - Gaiman

and really any short story by Zelanzy

hmm, I will have to look at my library again to remind me of others

Jon Miller

Chris
07-07-2004, 13:07:04
Originally posted by Help TCO
This rocks. It is more than just an SF adventure story. It's a story about morals and about choices and about the nature of man changing less than we think. It does indeed, the three phases of the book are fascinating, the early post-atomic world, that is so similar to the dark ages, the middle ground with the rise of Texarkana is roughly the renasance to the industrial revolution, and the end, with the second 20th century, and the pattarn of nukes being repeated.

Lazarus and the Gimp
07-07-2004, 16:27:22
My description of "Riddley Walker" was crap and rushed.

It's really the tale of people trying to make sense of their past. It's all told in a degenerated form of English, and concerns a young shamen-type character trying to make sense of the old legends through telling stories. Anyway, it's great.

Darkstar
07-07-2004, 19:31:34
Well, I like David Drake. However, I have to be in the right mood to appreciate his work. The Hammer Slammer's line is very good "SF'd" basic military fiction. But Drakie boy seems to have fallen into a treadmill with most of his work so it's all like that. He's got a few less military fiction focused works out there that show off he can really write when he chooses to. You just need to know if it's another "The Company/Brigade/platoon/fire squad is totally fucked. We've got half a clip each, we have to travel 1500 klicks through hostile territory, greasing every foot of the way with blood (better theirs then ours), and we only have 15 days to do it in. Let's roll!" or if it's something more interesting. (his book Fortress about the politics and machinations that went on dirt side concerning an orbital Fortress America Vanguard space station was very good).

I should look over my shelf and see what else I haven't recently recommeded here.

I think TCO didn't want this moved because TCO was hoping for more replies by keeping it in Main. Only, you mostly get spam on this sort of request if done in Main.

chagarra
08-07-2004, 04:14:14
I find Eric Flint's , Ring of Fire series, starting with 1632, also from Baen, to be very good.
Being a permanent webscription user saves me walking to the library for "new" books and authors works.

BigGameHunter
08-07-2004, 16:27:49
If you don't like one Kerouac novel, you probably won't like another...he's just that kind of writer. His work is "underwhelming" but in some cases, for some readers, that's an asset.
If you haven't already (and why haven't you!!!???) read the "Torturer" series by Gene Wolfe--far, far more than just a Sci/Fi/Fantasy novel....it's an experience!

JM^3
08-07-2004, 17:45:55
yah, everything that Gene Wolfe writes is amazingly good

JOn Miller

Sweeper
09-07-2004, 03:40:14
Barefoot in the Head by Brian Aldiss

In a Europe which has been destroyed by mind-altering-drug-bombs, a man drives to England, and becomes a prophet of sorts, leading a caravan of followers back into Europe for no discernable purpose. The writing style is the most extraordinary I have ever come across, the author merges words and concepts more cleverly than I can describe. The whole things reads like a stream of unconciousness. A dream. A drug-induced dream.

Funkodrom
09-07-2004, 09:27:07
That sounds intriguing.

Beta1
09-07-2004, 14:54:09
Originally posted by Lazarus and the Gimp
I haven't. What's it like?

sorry lost the thread when it moved.

you will either love or hate.

If you like historical fiction and if you are interested in the period you will find it riveting. The way the plot takes the fictional hero through the highs and lows of reformation europe is great. The feeling of people pulling strings just out of sight and how the powers that be always shut out any competion gives it a really oppresive feeling which leads well into the way the hero moves from religous idealism to cynical pragamatist and the final pointlessness of the whole journey.

Basically if you waqnt to see the good guys win dont bother.

If you want easy reading dont bother.

BigGameHunter
09-07-2004, 18:36:48
Shit! Those are my two main prerequisites!

GP
09-07-2004, 20:07:50
Mine are all easy to read and have good guys winning. But they mostly have some added character or social challenges (not just adventure)

Sweeper
10-07-2004, 22:39:21
Originally posted by Funkodrom
That sounds intriguing. It's not an easy read, it gets increasingly weird and decreasingly plotline, but its well worth a read just to be amazed by.