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protein
08-06-2004, 07:57:08
Jackie Chan, Steve Coogan, Cecille de France, Jim Broadbent, Kathy Bates, John Cleese, Sammo Hung, Ian McNiece, Karen Mok, Rob Schneider, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Wim Wenders, Luke Wilson, Owen Wilson, Richard Branson all appear in the same film - Around the World in 80 Days!

My god. Just the fact that Sammo and Jackie are teaming up again after so many years has me practically urinating myself with excitement. Add to that that half of it is filmed in a town in Thailand that I know and love and that Cooogaann and Jackiieee are theee starrrrsss III caaan barreely typpe propperlyyyyyyyyyyy......

http://www.comingsoon.net/movies/a/aroundtheworld.php

maroule
08-06-2004, 08:04:47
cecile de france is one cute belgian girl with a misleading name

protein
08-06-2004, 08:12:21
jkndajid iooadoaoa

sdff3403 000003 33333 ~~~~~####

ooooooh!

* jumps up and down.

Funkodrom
08-06-2004, 08:38:28
That sounds great!

fp@korea
08-06-2004, 08:49:58
Richard Branson?

Funkodrom
08-06-2004, 08:53:06
Cameo for the balloon part of the trip I assume.

Venom
08-06-2004, 12:53:54
Yes, this should rule. In a stupid way. But rule none the less.

Funkodrom
08-06-2004, 13:01:31
Hopefully in a Cannonball Run way.

Venom
08-06-2004, 13:11:20
I secretly worry about Jackie though. He's getting old. His movies have fewer fights and less entertaining ones. I'm sad. I guess I'll have to rub my DVDs of Drunken Master 2 and Police Story all over my naked body and remember better days.

protein
08-06-2004, 14:01:09
Amen to that.

Tony Ja is the new Jackie Chan. That guy is awesome.

Venom
08-06-2004, 14:32:57
I wonder if I can get any of his movies.

Immortal Wombat
08-06-2004, 19:18:36
Originally posted by Funkodrom
Cameo for the balloon part of the trip I assume.
What balloon part of the trip?

Funkodrom
08-06-2004, 19:28:08
The cartoon had a balloon part of the trip.

fp@korea
09-06-2004, 04:04:11
The cartoon was ace.

I've never read the book.

Funkodrom
09-06-2004, 08:47:53
Nor have I, I assume that the cartoon was very close to the original text. ;)

fp@korea
09-06-2004, 08:57:19
Complete and unabridged most likely. I even think that the Phileas Fogg from the book was an anthropomorphic lion.

Immortal Wombat
09-06-2004, 16:02:24
Entirely coincidentally I read the book again last weekend. The cartoon was ace, but alas the name of the principal character was not the only deviation from the original.

Koshko
13-06-2004, 23:12:41
Originally posted by protein
Amen to that.

Tony Ja is the new Jackie Chan. That guy is awesome.

Does he have the Jackie Chan style personality though?

protein
10-07-2004, 17:44:38
I just saw this film. It absolutely rules. It manages to be a kid's Disney film and a martial arts film at the same time. It's what Cannonball Run should have been like.

I reckon it's the best Jackie Chan film since Rumble in the Bronx or even Drunken Master II in terms of fight choreography and his chemistry with Steve Coogan really seems to work.

:beer:

Vincent
10-07-2004, 17:58:26
You guys really love Wim Wenders, right?

Debaser
10-07-2004, 18:10:07
Paris, Texas is quite good, and the Buena Vista Social Club documentary's really cool. Why?

Vincent
10-07-2004, 18:25:43
He's hell of an actor

Angelhorns
10-07-2004, 21:50:12
this is one of those films that promises great things, then fails to deliver. The casting of John Cleese is a sure sign...

fp@korea
11-07-2004, 03:22:44
I'm reading the book. It's "meh".

Venom
11-07-2004, 03:40:30
Well that's good to hear. I'll have to check it out.

Ooops. It's gone.

protein
11-07-2004, 10:38:11
Originally posted by Angelhorns
this is one of those films that promises great things, then fails to deliver. The casting of John Cleese is a sure sign...
John Cleese appears for less than three seconds. When did you see it?

The Mad Monk
11-07-2004, 12:56:52
Originally posted by fp@korea
Complete and unabridged most likely. I even think that the Phileas Fogg from the book was an anthropomorphic lion.

I take it that you don't mean the Mr. Magoo version, then?

The Mad Monk
11-07-2004, 12:58:19
We had a tv special 80 Days a half decade back or so, starring Pierce Brosnan. It was't bad.

Vincent
12-07-2004, 06:30:35
http://disney.go.com/disneypictures/80days

Funkodrom
12-07-2004, 08:21:24
Originally posted by protein
I just saw this film. It absolutely rules. It manages to be a kid's Disney film and a martial arts film at the same time. It's what Cannonball Run should have been like.

I reckon it's the best Jackie Chan film since Rumble in the Bronx or even Drunken Master II in terms of fight choreography and his chemistry with Steve Coogan really seems to work.

:beer:

Great. I look forward to seeing it.

fp@korea
12-07-2004, 11:50:33
The books getting better. Fogg is so English - the hot little indian chick he's rescued is doing everything except actually bending over, pulling up her skirt and saying "thrust your Big Ben up my back alley" and Phileas gets his french servant to go and undress her while she's unconscious. You can tell Monsieur Verne was a frog, that's for sure.

Nav@work
12-07-2004, 15:11:50
Hotdog magazine says it's absolute pants. :)

The Mad Monk
13-07-2004, 05:31:24
I haven't read the book, but that little tidbit sounds dead on with the Brosnan version. Is he playing Whist all the time?

The Mad Monk
13-07-2004, 05:36:03
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000093NOT/002-6795580-0108811?v=glance

That's the one. I hadn't realized it was from all the way back in 1989.

fp@korea
13-07-2004, 05:52:01
Yeah he plays Whist constantly for about two weeks between Suez and Bombay. Not exactly thrilling television, I would imagine.

The Mad Monk
13-07-2004, 06:02:55
It was only flashed a couple times, to give the audience an idea of the man's obsessive nature. :)

Found a reviewer who liked it much better than this new one -- it does draw direct comparisons, so THIS IS A SPOILER WARNING:


Around the World in 80 Days - Review
Official Movie Site!


Rated: PG
Distributor: Buena Vista Pictures

Starring: Jackie Chan, Steve Coogan, Robert Fyfe, Jim Broadbent, Ian McNiece, David Ryall, Roger Hammond, Adam Godley, Karen Mok, Cecile De France

Directed by Frank Coraci
Produced by Bill Badalato, Hal Lieberman
Written by David N. Titcher, David Benullo, David Andrew Goldstein

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Release Date: 2004-06-18
Reviewed by Joshua Tyler: 2004-06-16



I love Jackie Chan despite his recent flops and so was pretty excited when I heard heíd be taking a smaller, side-kick role in the new version of Around the World in 80 Days. It sounded like a new direction for him, taking on the part of Foggís haphazard valet rather than doing another Kung-Fu movie in which heís the center of attention. But Chan hasnít stepped down into a smaller, comedically supportive role. Instead heís completely taken over the movie, relegating everyone and everything about the traditional 80 Days story into the background to make room for him to do more wild-ass karate.

Jules Verneís original novel has been done dozens of times before, most notably in a 1956 theatrical release which won the Best Picture Oscar. Though that award is often pointed to as one of the biggest Oscar mistakes in history, the movie itself is a good one and worthy of at least some place in cinematic legend. But to my mind the only truly GREAT adaptation of Verneís brilliant concept is a 1989 television mini-series, starring a not-yet-Bond Brosnan, Python alum Eric Idle, and the recently departed Peter Ustinov in what for me was his most memorable role. That version was a globe spanning adventure that captured the wonder and excitement of Verneís work as well as the reserved nature of Phileas Fogg: Gentleman among gentlemen.

The newest 80 Days attempt is a Disney film, which means itís been watered down for kids while still trying to appeal to adults. Steve Coogan stars as a weird perversion of Fogg, who no longer seems to be a wealthy and naÔve gentleman, but is instead now a wild-ass inventor who has more in common with Doc Brown than the character of Phileas Fogg. The movie centers around characters engaging in a wide variety of mildly hilarious antics which see Fogg hiring Jackie Chan as his Butler. Chan is Passepartout, a Chinese warrior who robs the bank of England and then sneaks into Foggís employ as means of returning home undetected. He pulls the rug out from under Fogg and turns the movie into his own, finding thin excuses to show off his martial arts skills and throw himself about in typical Jackie Chan frenetic fashion.

As have all versions of Around the World, this one starts with a wager. Fogg bets his career against that of the head of the British Royal Academy of Science. If he can circumnavigate the globe in eighty days, he will take over as head of the Royal Academy. Should he failÖ he must never invent again! Fogg accepts the bet and races off around the world with his dishonest and newly acquired valet, a daunting task for anyone in 1876, let alone a man who has never taken a step outside London.

The movie never really stops to explore much of their journey, preferring to skip along the tracks to their arrivals at various destinations, with weird animated map interludes to link all those points together. Never willing to settle for something ďnormalĒ, director Frank Coraci makes his animated connections as outlandish as possible, resorting to such silly tricks as a winking statue of liberty and excessive swirly colors over Italy. That excess carries over into the rest of the film, as Jackie runs around punching people in the face and Fogg insists on coming up with outlandish and goofy contraptions to propel them across the world.

In the 1989 Brosnan version, thereís a fantastic scene where Phileas is closing in on London, only to discover his steam ship is out of fuel. Phileas doesnít hesitate. He strides up to the captain, demands he sell him his ship, and then proceeds to strip every piece of wood from its decks and throw it into the boiler in order to reach his goal. In the Jackie Chan version, the ship runs out of coal and Phileas decides to build a gigantic slingshot powered hang-glider on the deck after promising to buy the captain new nipples. He hops in and shoots into the sky trailing a magnificent stream of sparkling glitter. Slingshots and glitter you see, are wild-ass and exciting.

Thatís truly all Around the World in 80 Days has to offer: A big bag full of special effects and well choreographed kung fu. Itís great to see Jackie Chan kicking ass, itís just that this is completely the wrong movie in which to do it. They even drag out one of his old characters, Wong Fei-Hung and his ten tigers. Sure, theyíre heroes of Chinese cinema, and sure itís cool as heck to see Wong Fei-Hung being played by Sammo Hung and sure itís nice to watch him and Jackie fighting side by side up there on screen. But that isnít supposed to be THIS movie. Around the World in 80 Days is about Phileas Fogg and his journey around the world, not a showcase for a rehash of all of Jackie Chanís greatest his. Jackie is great, his choreography flawless, his comic timing spot on, but heís doing it in the wrong film.

This journey around the world is a weak-kneed version designed only for kids. It probably isnít even worth complaining about. Itís not that thereís no entertainment value in it, only that itís a watered down perversion of something that has been and could have still been exceptionally good. The much vaunted, traditional Around the World in 80 Days cameos are still there, even if none of what made the other tellings of this story rewarding is. Enjoy those, get all nostalgic watching Jackie re-enact his past, watch the kids giggle as Steve Coogan straps himself into a giant slingshot with Jackie Chan and a poor interpretation of a French woman. Itíll only hurt a little.


http://www.filmhobbit.com/review.php?id=544

fp@korea
13-07-2004, 06:14:29
Sounds like they really butchered the book, but I suppose that was only to be expected.

In the 1989 Brosnan version, thereís a fantastic scene where Phileas is closing in on London, only to discover his steam ship is out of fuel. Phileas doesnít hesitate. He strides up to the captain, demands he sell him his ship, and then proceeds to strip every piece of wood from its decks and throw it into the boiler in order to reach his goal. In the Jackie Chan version, the ship runs out of coal and Phileas decides to build a gigantic slingshot powered hang-glider on the deck after promising to buy the captain new nipples.
:lol:

BigGameHunter
13-07-2004, 16:33:11
Just saw Shanghai Nights (or is it Knights?) with Chan and Wilson.
Pretty funny stuff...wonder how it went over in the UK? Most of the humor was pretty tame--not too mean spirited.
Wilson and Chan are a pretty good "buddy movie" duo.

Angelhorns
17-07-2004, 00:43:39
Originally posted by protein
John Cleese appears for less than three seconds. When did you see it?

I havent seen it. I also havent seen a single film with John Cleese in that was anything better than average- I think this is because they wheel him on in American backed films for a bit of English whimsy, usually a sign the film is relying on shite visual/stereotype gags that hope to reprise his Monty Python comedy success.

I know the Jackie Chan stuff is probably good for people who like that stuff, but why oh why butcher a classic? Why not just make a kung fu film? The book was written in a time when the world was slower, and the challenge was steep to say the least, thats the joy of reading it- I just couldnt see through a kung fu Hollywood cameo studded version with Steve Coogan of all people in the lead (as much as I love him). The whole concept just appalls me :D

fp
18-07-2004, 21:21:09
"I also havent seen a single film with John Cleese in that was anything better than average"

A Fish Called Wanda was pretty good, although that was mostly due to Kevin Kline and Michael Palin.

Angelhorns
18-07-2004, 23:28:41
it was average. Michael Palin is pure gold in anything. The whole film was just a cringey stereotype based English 'whoops! there go my trousers!' style comedy of the sort that used to get made before we got cool and made Trainspotting.

I'd love to meet Michael Palin....

protein
18-07-2004, 23:37:26
I read an interview with John Cleese in the Independent and he came across as a miserable wanker. Michael Palin is still really cool though. I'm a big Michael Palin fan. I've read a couple of his travel books and I watch his travel shows all the time.

MOBIUS
19-07-2004, 14:44:03
I thought it was OK in a very childish and juvenile kind of way...

Still I didn't have to pay anything.

I did find it jumping around too much, but what do you expect trying to fit 80 days into a couple of hours.

6/10

Darkstar
19-07-2004, 20:23:52
Originally posted by Angelhorns
I know the Jackie Chan stuff is probably good for people who like that stuff, but why oh why butcher a classic? Why not just make a kung fu film? The book was written in a time when the world was slower, and the challenge was steep to say the least, thats the joy of reading it- I just couldnt see through a kung fu Hollywood cameo studded version with Steve Coogan of all people in the lead (as much as I love him). The whole concept just appalls me :D

Well, Jackie is getting too old to do major fight fests. He's like an old stuntman... he aches when it rains, he aches when it is sunny. Jackie is looking to move completely into comedy and out of action which is why he did 80 Days. (How that helps him, I don't know, but that is what he says...)

Second, the studios wanted to keep their rights. That's why they remake this stuff.

Third, didn't a highly independantly lady of the time show that you could get around the entire world in just 45 or 46 days without having much difficulty? Its just that the unwashed masses of the time thought it was a big deal? I seem to recall her name (and her feat of travelling the world so quickly) being mentioned repeatily in old Sufferage material that we had to study when I was but a wart of a troll in wee little troll school.