PDA

View Full Version : Voyager in the Night, CJ Cherryh.


Qweeg
20-10-2003, 11:31:11
I read this before, and think I've mentioned it on the internet before too.

This book really is the most alien representation of alienness I've come across in a book or film. Really good, about half way through it turns into a really good representation of what life as intelligent software in a computer system might be like too.
My favourite character is <>, allthough seemed like quite a mysterious fellow.... and I would have loved to have learnt more about the cannibal ==== and it's many segments.

It also gets a little intense regarding the relationships between the humans involved in the story, Cherryh gets like that sometimes, she was the same with 40, 000 in Gehanna, there's a kind of gloopyness that gives me the creeps with her writing sometimes. But all in all, top stuff. Anyone know if Cyteen is still in print anywhere?

RedFred
21-10-2003, 23:13:18
Why didn't you just pull up the last thread you wrote on this exact same subject?

Sean
03-12-2003, 18:57:30
Damned if I can find the other thread. I should point out that the title is Voyager in Night, and that it was most recently reprinted as part of Alternate Worlds, a Cherryh collection.

Not sure about Cyteen, but the library found me a copy :p. I’ll read that next.

And yes, I also wanted to know more about ====. It creeped me out.

Rodgers
04-12-2003, 09:01:36
40 Thousand in Gehenna is another weird Cherryh book about humans interracting with aliens and eventually evolving to become more like them.

I'm waiting for the next in the Merchanter Universe series to come out - will be interested to see how she develops the hint of a new world being discovered by the Mazzianni in "Tripoint"

RedFred
06-12-2003, 23:33:56
I think that the first thread was started by me and titled something like Cherryh: er or or.

Sean
07-12-2003, 11:06:16
Ah yes, I remembered that when I was looking for that series. At present I have Inheritor and Invader, but not Foreigner. Which is annoying.

Sean
07-12-2003, 11:07:30
Is Downbelow Station any good? Forty Thousand in Gehenna slaims they are connected, albeit loosely.

RedFred
10-12-2003, 00:24:58
Yeah it is part of the whole Union/Alliance set of stories. Worth a read.

I just got through Tad Williams' lastest two or three thousand page, four book novel. Nice writing and the first decent book to look at the future of the internet since Snowcrash but couldn't he have made it a little shorter?

Darkstar
11-12-2003, 03:45:10
Downbelow Station? I've read that, a long time ago. I remember it being so so, but cannot recall the details now. That a part of the Uplift line? Or are we talking the human and clone colony? Both books had very similar titles, which is why I am getting them confused.

Sean
13-12-2003, 17:42:02
Thanks DS.

RedFred, that wasn’t helpful at all.

RedFred
13-12-2003, 23:22:07
:o

Rodgers
18-12-2003, 13:20:56
Originally posted by Sean
Is Downbelow Station any good? Forty Thousand in Gehenna slaims they are connected, albeit loosely.


Yes - 40,000 is based on the premise that Union colonised a planet at some point in the war but for either military or political reasons were forced to abandon the colonists to their own fate. As the book mentions off-planet issues very very rarely and only then at the start and finish of the books, it is pretty much a stand-alone novel.

Rodgers
18-12-2003, 13:24:55
Originally posted by Darkstar
Downbelow Station? I've read that, a long time ago. I remember it being so so, but cannot recall the details now. That a part of the Uplift line? Or are we talking the human and clone colony? Both books had very similar titles, which is why I am getting them confused.

No clones or uplifts involved. There are aliens but the "Hisa" are neaderthal-level ape-like creatures. Sometimes a little annoyingly cutesy I thought.

Downbelow is a great book for its intertwining of perspectives that give a really good picture of a complex 3-sided war and it's eventual "climax". The rest of the Merchanter-Union series explores different points in time in that universe's history from all sides in the war both before, during and after.

RedFred
18-12-2003, 20:46:53
Good summary Rodgers. If there is any similarity between the two books it is over the emergence of sentience. The downbelow natives in one novel and the 'de-engineered' human clones having to think for themselves in 40,000.

Sean, the best source for info on Ms. Cherryh's many books is her own website.

Sean
25-12-2003, 10:03:47
I have been reading that, but I wanted other opinions. Thanks you two, much appreciated.

Foreigner is waiting for me at Waterstone’s. I have the other two, but they claimed this was out of print. I begged to differ, so they relented and phoned their American suppliers. Grudgingly they admitted it was available, but would take six weeks. This was on Monday.

Noisy
31-12-2003, 13:20:40
I've read some Cherryh, primarily because of recommendations that I've seen here.

And now it is my turn to pass on a recommendation:

Avoid. Try doing something worthwhile instead. There are some good bits, but the endings are crap.

Jon Miller part Deux
05-01-2004, 10:58:00
pone of my favorite authors, and I own it too

now I will read the thread

Jon Miller

Jon Miller part Deux
05-01-2004, 10:59:36
Originally posted by Rodgers
40 Thousand in Gehenna is another weird Cherryh book about humans interracting with aliens and eventually evolving to become more like them.

I'm waiting for the next in the Merchanter Universe series to come out - will be interested to see how she develops the hint of a new world being discovered by the Mazzianni in "Tripoint"

that would be extremely cool

I like how they have teh weirdness of the navigators, even though she does nto go into them anymroe...

Jon Miller

Jon Miller part Deux
05-01-2004, 11:23:33
there has only been three threads on her, and that includes mine

jonM iller