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paiktis22
07-04-2003, 23:57:55
There's this movie with meril strip, that australian actress who used to be married with tom cruise and another relatively known actress.

and that movie got a lot of oscars.


why?


it was pretty much empty....


if you wanna do this kind of deep middle life depression go inside show the reasons like the frenchies do...


this movie seemed to melike an empty shell.



unless it is refering to a known book of virginia wolf and the audience who read it can do some sort of connection?


it really seemed like an empty shell movie to me.


depressed middle aged wives with a little declinational behavior even for depression to boot.

so what?


enlighten me will you?

GP
08-04-2003, 01:05:37
never saw it. But hollywood is full of shit anyway. Usually like independant and foreign films better. Hollywood should stick to the big action/adventure stuff.

RedFred
08-04-2003, 01:47:26
Everyone's tastes are different. Some people like to double space between every single phrase of their post, for example.

I thought that The Hours was a decent movie, but not a great one. Because of the way the movie is structured you could consider it to have three different female lead actors. All put in exceptional performances but Nicole Kidman was the best and perhaps even deserving of her Oscar.

My assumption is that you have never read any Virginia Wolfe. I think that being a fan helps but is not required to enjoy this movie. I like 'big action/adventure stuff' too, but a steady diet of those type of movies only wouldn't satisfy me.

But then I loved The English Patient, both the novel and the film, but it was too slow and too depressing for many others...

GP
08-04-2003, 03:08:44
English Patient sucked. It was pseudo-whatever. I was happy when that bitch died in the cave. Only liked the Indian doctor. EVery other person in that movie deserved to get a slap.

Scabrous Birdseed
08-04-2003, 07:42:02
I hate Virginia Woolf with a passion. I'm convinced she wrote her books as an excercise in how to be as boring as humanly possible.

BigGameHunter
08-04-2003, 08:11:36
No, you're thinking of Anthony Trollope.

maroule
08-04-2003, 08:47:09
time to learn some tolerance, kids
because you don't understand or don't appreciate somebody else's work doesn't make it shit. I hate De Stael as a painter (just saw an exhibition of him the other day) but I also realise I just don't get it, mainly because my culture of modern art is quite limited.


Accept your inadequacies
Learn to surrender
Defeat is sweet

Scabrous Birdseed
08-04-2003, 09:02:56
Bollocks. If a woman can't write, she can't write.

maroule
08-04-2003, 09:21:45
ah. So you read the book, to make such an informed statement.

Scabrous Birdseed
08-04-2003, 09:54:47
Nah, I read another book by her. Enough, I say. Heck, even a few sentences is enough.

Sean
08-04-2003, 10:02:03
Thing about The Hours was the opening third of the film was quite breathtaking, but after that it kinda just fell apart. The performances were all damn good, too.

Not showing the reasons: :confused:. Why on earth would you do that?

GP
08-04-2003, 12:07:32
Originally posted by maroule
time to learn some tolerance, kids
because you don't understand or don't appreciate somebody else's work doesn't make it shit. I hate De Stael as a painter (just saw an exhibition of him the other day) but I also realise I just don't get it, mainly because my culture of modern art is quite limited.


Accept your inadequacies
Learn to surrender
Defeat is sweet

Sometimes understanding drives dislike.

GP
08-04-2003, 12:08:31
Donno about Virginia Wolf, but the English Patiant. Puh-leeze.

GP
08-04-2003, 12:09:07
No offense to anybody who liked it...*whistles*

King_Ghidra
08-04-2003, 14:17:18
Well i haven't seen The Hours, but i have read Mrs Dalloway and i think it is magnificent.

I liked The English Patient as well.

I like a lot of similarly tragic tales from that period - F Scott Fitzgerald (Great Gatsby, tender is the night); Ford Maddox Ford (the Good Soldier); Graham Greene (End of the Affair (also a pretty good film i'd say) Heart of the Matter) etc..

paiktis22
08-04-2003, 16:55:09
you show the reasons in order to inject some badly needed interest in that empty shell movie (IMO).


the only salvation for that film was that it might be decent IF you have read the book. apparently this isnt the case so there's really no excuse for its total unoriginality and boredom.


the english patient sucked in my opinion too, we ended up laughing our asses off in the end (couldnt really take it anymore).

paiktis22
08-04-2003, 16:56:46
if you want to make a deep movie, showing depressed homosexuals parading the screen is generally not enough

thus why IMHO it was an "empty shell" movie.
performances were burried by the wanting scenario IMO

GP
08-04-2003, 17:01:16
All the characters in The Great Gatsby needed a slap to. I didn't give a shit about them. I'll take the Grapes of Wrath characters over them in a hearbeat.

paiktis22
08-04-2003, 17:15:21
GP from english cinema check out Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barels.

The way it should be made!

Bend it like Becham seemed like a cutshort copy but still not wasting of ticket money

theat movie with the footballer was also just OK.

King_Ghidra@home
08-04-2003, 17:16:40
GP, isn't that the point? Fitzgerald is writing about a rich, debauched and jaded group of individuals. They do need a slap.

Lots of Steinbeck characters need a slap too. If someone's annoying it doesn't mean they're not a good/realistic character, or that the book isn't a great book.

Paikitis, you needn't say IMHO and IMO - if you say it, i trust it is your opinion.

GP
08-04-2003, 17:19:31
That may be the point. But I sure don't need to read about it. Just like I don't need to watch a car rust or grass grow. And the point needs to be driven home harder...about how fucked up they all are.

And I heard people actually had sympathy for that lady in the EP. I wanted her to die. All 3 in that love triangle were silly.

GP
08-04-2003, 17:20:34
Steinbeck writes from the gut and the heart. He rocks. I would take his characters (even though he is a lib and all) and go napalm all the babies of the Fitzgerald characters.

King_Ghidra@home
08-04-2003, 17:30:13
Originally posted by GP
That may be the point. But I sure don't need to read about it. Just like I don't need to watch a car rust or grass grow. And the point needs to be driven home harder...about how fucked up they all are.


Yes and if no one wrote about it no one would know would they?

Fitzgerlad surely only did for the upper classes what steinbeck did for the oakies.

So you prefer reading about blue collar guys, great. Well i'm interested in all strata, and thankful that there are books out there that let me read about them.

Sean
08-04-2003, 17:41:15
you show the reasons in order to inject some badly needed interest in that empty shell movie
Even though that would take away from the focus of the film and most likely be just dull exposition?

Anyway, like I said, I thought it didn’t sustain its momentum. Probably because of the scenario, but I wouldn’t call it an empty shell.

Oh, and the best British film lately was Dirty Pretty Things (http://uk.imdb.com/Title?0301199). It got nowhere near the publicity it deserved.

paiktis22
08-04-2003, 17:42:24
Ghindra, In times of high personal insecurity as the present I become unbearably polite. Sorry.

paiktis22
08-04-2003, 17:47:13
Originally posted by Sean
Even though that would take away from the focus of the film and most likely be just dull exposition?


Why?

In this film all they did was parade a few depressed women around....


not only were there no reasons for that (just a chemically imbalanced mind is not that interesting...) they didnt even do anything interesting or act (the movie characters) in such a way or even just let us pick a little bit into their inner most psyche.

Just few women beating their heads against the wall, thats the impression i got.

of course different strokes for different folks.

King_Ghidra@home
08-04-2003, 17:48:52
Originally posted by paiktis22
Ghindra, In times of high personal insecurity as the present I become unbearably polite. Sorry.

:D sorry, it's just a pet hate of mine.

We can all speak our minds here, we're adults right? :beer:

I'm prepared to have my opinions knocked down, i mean, in my experience the only way to really understand your own opinions is to have argue for them.


btw, it's 'Ghidra' :D

Lazarus and the Gimp
08-04-2003, 19:29:05
Good Lord. Has GP watched a movie with no explosions in it?

GP
08-04-2003, 20:19:23
I listed a couple. The Rope. Sunset Boulevard.

Lazarus and the Gimp
08-04-2003, 20:34:33
Did they sedate you beforehand?

GP
08-04-2003, 20:37:25
No. I dug em.

GP
08-04-2003, 20:37:55
See...they weren't pretentious like the frigging English Patient.

GP
08-04-2003, 20:38:18
I almost broke up with a gf about seeing that flick.

GP
08-04-2003, 20:48:13
Was my second of third date with this one gal, Jeannie.

We were at her place. HAving a great chat with her best friend, Lisa and her husband, Jeff. (http://nusports.ocsn.com/sports/m-footbl/mtt/genyk_jeff00.html)

EVerybody was in a good mood. We were all having a great chat, drinking beers. It was 2230 on a Saturday night. I'm on the deck in her living room. everybody else was in an easy chair.

Anyway, Lisa starts gushing about the English Patient and how she has seen it 3 times. Then she phones around, finds a theatre and gets us all to go to a 2300 showing.

I don't like the movie (not so much for it being slow or girlie, but because of the terminal silliness and pretentiousness of it...plus it was boring.) Jeff is dying, trying not to fall asleep. I'm just getting more and more pissed. Halfway through, Jeannie leans over to me and says, "I'm really sorry. Just hang in there." It's a good thing she was psychic. As I was really ready to say asta. It meant a lot to me that she said that...and could read my mind.

GP
08-04-2003, 20:51:56
Ended up spending 3 years with her...

KrazyHorse
08-04-2003, 21:53:43
Originally posted by GP
English Patient sucked. It was pseudo-whatever. I was happy when that bitch died in the cave. Only liked the Indian doctor. EVery other person in that movie deserved to get a slap.

That sounds like Passage to India.

Never saw/read English Patient, though.

And your feeling reminds me of how I felt when I had to read Madame Bovary for some French class or another.

When she finally died I burst out laughing...

KrazyHorse
08-04-2003, 21:55:19
Originally posted by GP
Steinbeck writes from the gut and the heart. He rocks. I would take his characters (even though he is a lib and all) and go napalm all the babies of the Fitzgerald characters.

:lol:

:b: on Steinbeck and on dislike for Fitzgerald.

GP
08-04-2003, 22:07:17
To quote a great man (as RC likes to do):

"Ooh-rah, muthafukka!"

GP
08-04-2003, 22:08:39
Originally posted by KrazyHorse
That sounds like Passage to India.

Never saw/read English Patient, though.

And your feeling reminds me of how I felt when I had to read Madame Bovary for some French class or another.

When she finally died I burst out laughing...

You are spot on. It's just even worse. It's like Out of Africa. Except its more...

KrazyHorse
08-04-2003, 22:17:53
I didn't mind Passage to India, though. Wasn't so whiny. And was quite obviously making fun of oversensitive English women.

Guy who wrote it was gay, IIRC. Anti-Empire book.

KrazyHorse
08-04-2003, 22:21:31
Except the woman didn't die in the cave; she thought she got raped by an Indian doctor (he was overly-trying-to-fit-in-with-whites type of guy, but turned against by his encounter with justice system).

GP
09-04-2003, 00:33:54
I agree, kitty-san. PTI was ok. EP was whiney. All characters in that movie should be shot. And anyone who liked it probably likes Catcher in the Rye...so they need "reprogramming". Could you set up the necessary socialist self-ciritcism apparatus?

KrazyHorse
09-04-2003, 01:10:51
Way too creepy for me, that shit. Ask Che...

GP
09-04-2003, 01:39:08
As if things weren't bad enough, I'm drinking wine...

King_Ghidra
09-04-2003, 08:17:31
Originally posted by GP
I agree, kitty-san. PTI was ok. EP was whiney. All characters in that movie should be shot. And anyone who liked it probably likes Catcher in the Rye...so they need "reprogramming". Could you set up the necessary socialist self-ciritcism apparatus?

now you're starting on catcher in the rye?

so what is it, that the all american hardman gp can't face a world where everyone isn't a tough talking blue collar guy like him?

still at least you've moved on to shooting the characters you don't like rather than slapping them. I thought you were a limp-wristed mincing little queen for a minute.

GP
09-04-2003, 12:45:17
LOL. If you're going to be limp-wristed do it boldly! I already told Laz a couple movies that I liked that were more cerebral. I just don't like the pretentious, pseudo-cerebral type.

GP
09-04-2003, 12:45:52
Oh...and Catcher sucked. Totally over-rated.

paiktis22
09-04-2003, 17:02:25
Originally posted by King_Ghidra@home
:D sorry, it's just a pet hate of mine.

We can all speak our minds here, we're adults right? :beer:

I'm prepared to have my opinions knocked down, i mean, in my experience the only way to really understand your own opinions is to have argue for them.


btw, it's 'Ghidra' :D

just in case of misundestanding. im not insecure because of posting my opinions here :D


im generally a bit insecure these days (weeks gasp) due to some health complication

KrazyHorse
10-04-2003, 05:05:31
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
now you're starting on catcher in the rye?

so what is it, that the all american hardman gp can't face a world where everyone isn't a tough talking blue collar guy like him?

still at least you've moved on to shooting the characters you don't like rather than slapping them. I thought you were a limp-wristed mincing little queen for a minute.

I can't stand fucking Catcher either.

That and frigging Gatsby were the most overrated books I read in high school.

Worse since then was To the Lighthouse by Virginia Fucking Woolf

200 pages and nothing happens. :sleep:

Would have been better with some :shoot: or :beer: or maybe some :heart: followed by a :smoke:

KrazyHorse
10-04-2003, 05:07:09
Honestly. I don't want to hear somebody's insipid self-important agonising over their pathetic, drab life.

KrazyHorse
10-04-2003, 05:10:08
The books I hate were the Avril Lavignes of the late 19th and early twencen...

Distance has transformed them from the shabby attempts at emotionally engaging the drones into supposed classics.

Darkstar
10-04-2003, 05:21:35
Originally posted by KrazyHorse
Honestly. I don't want to hear somebody's insipid self-important agonising over their pathetic, drab life.

You don't? Isn't that what the internet is for these days?

Darkstar
10-04-2003, 05:22:44
Great G bored me silly. And that was back when I considered boring books an interesting intellectual challenge to find something interesting.

But whatever floats your boat...

KrazyHorse
10-04-2003, 05:25:46
God, I'm in agreement with the Americans. :(

Darkstar
10-04-2003, 05:46:01
Poor KH! Of course, you often are.

Debaser
10-04-2003, 22:30:27
Catcher in the Rye is probably the book I've read more than any other, (not very long, no big complicated words). It's a great story, despite knowing how good it is I'm still suprised by it every time. One of my favourite thing in the V&A museum is the Catcher in the Rye first edition.

Another great book in the same sort of style as Catcher is The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. A harrowing tale of a depressed chick who tries to kill herself, goes mad and gets fat.

GP
10-04-2003, 23:11:42
RED SKY AT MORNING is the book CATCHER should have been. Just like I CAN SEE BY THE LIGHT OF MY UNIFORM is the book that ON THE ROAD should have been. (And before somehow tells me how conservative I am, all 4 books were written by political liberals.)

Sean
10-04-2003, 23:16:33
Who cares?

Debaser
10-04-2003, 23:25:24
Originally posted by Sean
Who cares?

Sean, allow me. GP....

http://www.ihateaol.co.uk/misc/funnypics/dontcare.jpg

GP
10-04-2003, 23:38:02
Originally posted by Sean
Who cares?

You sound a little aggrieved...

KrazyHorse
11-04-2003, 01:41:02
Did anybody else notice that france is yellow on that map?

:smoke:

RedFred
11-04-2003, 04:49:06
Looks like somebody has launched an invasion in California. I can't quite make it out... Madagascar?

maroule
11-04-2003, 07:48:15
Originally posted by Debaser
The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath. A harrowing tale of a depressed chick who tries to kill herself, goes mad and gets fat.


if it wasn't for 'chick' I would have sweared it was Venom's story

King_Ghidra
11-04-2003, 08:25:37
Originally posted by Sean
Who cares?

Absolutely, i have no idea why gp is so concerned with whether anyone thinks he is a liberal or a conservative or why anyone would even think about politics in the context of this literary discussion.

Debaser, i enjoyed The Bell Jar, i read it at uni which was probably the right time to read it, much as college was the right time to read Catcher in the Rye.

Both of these books share a common theme of the battle between the teenage yearning for entry in to full adulthood whilst being conscious and somewhat afraid of the final loss of childhood innocence.

I see it very much as a parallel of the 'would you rather have knowledge and be sad, or be ignorant and happy' question. Realistically, once you enter adulthood the die is cast and that world of happy ignorance is gone forever.

King_Ghidra
11-04-2003, 08:30:09
btw, GP what is this 'I CAN SEE BY THE LIGHT OF MY UNIFORM' book about? Amazon and Google don't seem to have heard of it...

I'm interested because i'd love to know why it's 'the book "On the road" should have been'.

Sean
11-04-2003, 08:33:04
One that wasn’t written, perhaps :)?

Funkodrom
11-04-2003, 08:33:31
Realistically, once you enter adulthood the die is cast and that world of happy ignorance is gone forever.

Unless you are Drekkus.

BigGameHunter
11-04-2003, 15:09:50
I think "On the Road" was a great book, but by no means the best by Kerouac. For a really great read, try "Desolation Angels" or even his first work, "The Town and the City", which has a very different style and flavor than subsequent works.
As for the loss of innocence...yes to that, yes to that. Those books don't really appeal to me anymore, because I've lived most of that ennui and social lethargy. Now I want something light and fantastical to forget the drudgery of daily life.
But for a great author in that genre, one who exceeds Kerouac and others of his ilk, check out anything by John Fante....a very excellent writer.

GP
11-04-2003, 20:56:07
Originally posted by King_Ghidra
Absolutely, i have no idea why gp is so concerned with whether anyone thinks he is a liberal or a conservative or why anyone would even think about politics in the context of this literary discussion.

Debaser, i enjoyed The Bell Jar, i read it at uni which was probably the right time to read it, much as college was the right time to read Catcher in the Rye.

Both of these books share a common theme of the battle between the teenage yearning for entry in to full adulthood whilst being conscious and somewhat afraid of the final loss of childhood innocence.

I see it very much as a parallel of the 'would you rather have knowledge and be sad, or be ignorant and happy' question. Realistically, once you enter adulthood the die is cast and that world of happy ignorance is gone forever.

I thought there were some people who thought I was a troglodyte for political reasons. Maybe you just see me as mentally a trog...;)

And politics has an impact on how you react to a story. i tell all my liberal freinds to read Grapes of Wrath. I know it will resonate with them. On a human level it resonated with me too. But I know it will charge them to go out and campaign for social justice or whatever it is they are into...

GP
11-04-2003, 21:03:23
I got the title wrong. It is: I SEE BY MY OUTFIT by Peter S. Beagle (maybe more well-known as the author of THE LAST UNICORN).

Here is an AMAZON link: http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0140095535/qid=1050094930/sr=1-6/ref=sr_1_6/103-0239209-8692643?v=glance&s=books

The book is magical. It touched me, where ON THE ROAD didn't.

BigGameHunter
11-04-2003, 22:38:25
The only thing that seems to touch you is the greasy finger of testosterone.
;)

King_Ghidra@home
11-04-2003, 23:01:15
:lol:

yes i guess once gp has finished fixing up the tractor, fixing himself a drink and knocking the missus around, must be nice to settle down with a good book :p

Oh and from a customer review of that book on the Amazon site:

"From the first chapter onward there are words from secrest languages that encode the content of the writng making it sometimes incomprehensable." :lol:

Never heard of Beagle, but you've piqued my curisoity i'll admit, think i'll try and get hold of one of his books.

GP
12-04-2003, 01:49:03
Oh...just looked at that review. The guy spells even worse than me--not Beagle, the reveiwer.

I understand what he is saying though. Beagle uses some pet names (like Jenny for his scooter) and some references to things that I guess you would almost need to be "one of the family" to understand. But I still "got" the book just fine...

GP
12-04-2003, 11:31:52
The Last Unicorn is considered a classic of modern fantasy. Like the Once and Future King.

GP
12-04-2003, 11:33:16
I'm surprised you've never heard of Beagle. He's a big Tolkein-booster and is often the introduction -writer for US Tolkein editions (including the recent movie tie-in ones.) But maybe you are a Brit. Anyway, he's reasonably well-known.

GP
23-04-2003, 05:49:28
I JUST read a book that I liked (this is rather rare). It was by Frank Herbert. And to continue the theme: THE SANTAROGA BARRIER is the story that THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN should have been.

Darkstar
23-04-2003, 06:38:47
Andromeda Strain isn't bad TV. Don't know about what kind of book it would be. I read the book once, but I don't remember it at all.